My Qualcomm Sucks.

Topic 6540 | Page 1

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Cleft_Asunder's Comment
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So I work for May trucking, and we have these qualcomms from like... 2007, but they feel like a combination of windows 95 + early touch screen tech. It's also huge and instead of being mounted to the dash, is free roaming, so it's very annoying. Some trucks have this other device installed, not sure the name, that they went to instead of an updated qualcomm. Word is that may is working with the company making the device so they have money in it. The bad news is that when the testing is done, it will have this separate device that you have to wave in front of PRE/POST trip spots. For example, if I'm near the engine, I have to be there 3 minutes (no less), or near the 5th wheel et cetera. Everything will total about 15 minutes combined. I don't think that feature is in right now since I bet the drivers would be talking smack about it.

Any way, the whole idea is crazy because it's nanny-state type technology and an insult to the trucker. You're essentially distrusted and they have to micro manage your pre/post trip. I wonder how many experienced and new truck drivers may will lose if it gets implemented, because the truth is that you can do a thorough lookover without being out there 15 min. (more like 7-8) And the whole thing is exaggerated any way, because its the major parts like oil, tires, fluids, air hoses, and lights, 5th wheel that really need to be looked at daily. I admit I'm not always looking at everything when I'm tired, and neither did my instructor, so it will really be a turnoff if that feature goes with it.

I wish we had new qualcomms. :(

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

I think like most changes, this is no big deal at all. Fast forward to 2:15 on this video and you'll see how it works.

This versatile portable tablet features powerful built-in apps, multimedia features, and the ability to customize the platform for your operation. Watch this video demonstration and learn more about Zonar 2020's features and functionality.

One interesting aspect of this particular version they're talking about is that you can take a photo of the problem with the device at the time you're filing the report and it submits it to the company. Not bad. The first thought I had was, "So much for those mysterious breakdowns that happen in Pennsylvania on almost every load going to New Jersey or New York!" ... what I mean by that for those of you who are new to driving .... ...everyone hates going to the Northeast because the terrain, traffic, and navigation is extremely difficult - the toughest in the country overall. Well drivers will often pick up a load in the Midwest or West Coast and haul it to Pennsylvania where "suddenly" they either run out of hours or have a breakdown and someone has to come and get the load from them and take it the last 100 miles or so into Jersey and deliver it. I can't begin to count the number of times I've seen this over the years. Dispatch: Brett, can you go to Scranton and re-power a load for us? The driver [broke down, ran out of hours, got sick, or whatever the lie was] and can't make the delivery. Brett: Nope. The driver and his truck are fine. He hauled the load from St. Louis to within 100 miles of the destination just fine. He'll figure it out! Dispatch knew these guys were doing that of course because it happened almost every day. No loads going West or South ever needs to be repowered. Only loads going to the Northeast, like there's a "truck fairy" in Eastern Pennsylvania that magically runs you out of hours or tears up your truck just before you had to go into Jersey. Amazing how that happens!

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!
Oh man. Good drivers hard to find around there?

Good drivers are hard to find everywhere.

One time I was talking with another driver and he told me, "Throughout my childhood my dad always owned about 5 or 6 trucks. He told me not one time in all his years owning those trucks did he have a good driver in every one of them."

My friend who works at the company with about 50-60 trucks - every single week just about they have a rollover, or someone gets hit by a train, or someone gets stuck on the railroad tracks on a restricted route they were specifically told to stay off of, or like yesterday when a driver stayed home as long as possible, tried driving all night to make the delivery, fell asleep at the wheel, and drove into the river.

wtf.gif

Now when I say "attitude is everything" and being kind will get you far in this industry, here's why.....

That "river guy" (who was unhurt by the way) - he was quite a ways from home and even though he was going to be fired they were going to put him in a hotel for the night until another driver could pick him up in the morning and bring him home. Now keep in mind he had only been with the company for four months and just drove a $150,000 worth of equipment and 45,000 pounds of dog food into the river. Well the dude went off on my friend and started screaming that the tow truck driver should be allowed to bring him home immediately - about 200 miles. Well my friend told him he's crazy. They're not paying a 200 mile tow bill so he can come home 12 hours earlier. So the guy started cussin' and called my friend a bunch of names, said he ain't stayin in a d*mn hotel room and that his wife will come get him, and hung up on my friend. Ten minutes later he calls back and says, "My wife won't come get me so I'll take the motel room." Well unfortunately he burned that bridge too because the hotel room was cancelled.

Here's another one - same company, last week.....

One of their drivers that has been there for several years regularly picks up and delivers at a place right down the road from his house. Works out great because he gets home a lot and gets good miles. The other day he shows up 10 minutes late for his appointment and finds that the company put another driver in his spot. This dude goes off on the shipping clerk, throws his logbook at the shipping window in front of her, and screams and cusses until security hauls him out of the place. He gets banned for life from the place. He was the one who was late but somehow that didn't factor into his decision making or his behavior. Instead he goes berserk and fortunately he only gets banned from the place. He should have been taken away in cuffs and fired on the spot. Instead, because this stuff happens so often in trucking, my friend is going to make him go through anger management classes and write an apology letter to that company if he wants to keep his job.

THAT is the reality you deal with when trying to manage a company of truck drivers. I mean, the "river dude" just started there, screws up, destroys a bunch of equipment, destroys an entire load of freight, and then screams and cusses out the office personnel after being fired because they won't accommodate him they way he feels he should be accommodated for whatever reason. The other dude, late for his appointment, decides to start screaming, cussin, and throwing things at people because he has to wait for one other truck to be loaded in front of him.

And this company only has 50 trucks and most of them are experienced drivers. Imagine what it's like at companies with thousands of trucks!!

There always has been and always will be a tremendous shortage of "top tier" drivers out there because very few people have the ability, the personality, and the dedication it takes to do this job at a high level. Any knucklehead can drive 2,200 miles a week on a run from Florida to Texas. But the drivers that can turn 2,800+ miles per week safely in all terrain, weather, and road conditions year in and year out while acting like true professionals are very rare indeed.

Anyone who thinks drivers should be trusted and left alone to do their job has never tried managing a group of drivers. There isn't a profession in the world that would tolerate the utter lack of decency and professionalism that so many drivers in this industry display. It's sad and sickening at the same time. That's why I preach attitude and professionalism all the time....because it's sorely lacking.

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

This came across my Qualcomm this morning, which kind of seems to render this Big Brother gadgetry redundant and a bit of a moot point.screenshot of <span class= FMCSA logbook regulation" title="screenshot of FMCSA logbook regulation"/>

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
The bad news is that when the testing is done, it will have this separate device that you have to wave in front of PRE/POST trip spots. For example, if I'm near the engine, I have to be there 3 minutes (no less), or near the 5th wheel et cetera. Everything will total about 15 minutes combined. I don't think that feature is in right now since I bet the drivers would be talking smack about it.

Now this is the first I've heard of anything like this. Are you saying you might have to carry a device around that will measure how long you're standing near certain parts of the truck while doing a pre-trip?

confused.gif

Cleft_Asunder's Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

The bad news is that when the testing is done, it will have this separate device that you have to wave in front of PRE/POST trip spots. For example, if I'm near the engine, I have to be there 3 minutes (no less), or near the 5th wheel et cetera. Everything will total about 15 minutes combined. I don't think that feature is in right now since I bet the drivers would be talking smack about it.

double-quotes-end.png

Now this is the first I've heard of anything like this. Are you saying you might have to carry a device around that will measure how long you're standing near certain parts of the truck while doing a pre-trip?

confused.gif

Exactly. This will turn off drivers from signing up if they find out about it, and the ones that are signed up will be reluctant to stay. I recall it being called zonearc or something but I can't find info on it. I will ask around and update this post in the future.

Jimbo's Comment
member avatar

Now that sounds more like BabySitArc if you ask me....

Ralph G. ( Arejay )'s Comment
member avatar

Exactly. This will turn off drivers from signing up if they find out about it, and the ones that are signed up will be reluctant to stay. I recall it being called zonearc or something but I can't find info on it. I will ask around and update this post in the future.

Yep, zonearc (not sure of the spelling), but I heard some talk about it on the radio today... it appears to be a real thing.

Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Well, guess we better get to work on finding a way to "fix" that sumb****. smile.gif

Honestly, if that does become a reality then I believe trucking is gonna see a mass retirement event unfold, which will actually work in the mega companies` favor. New blood, less pay and just hold the wheel. Who knows.

Justin N.'s Comment
member avatar

Ha, if my company started doing that I would just skip the pretrip entirely and save myself 15 minutes.

Don't care what safety says or threatens me with. This is not something that will ever take hold with all the backlash it would create.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

It's "Zonar" - that is what our company (Knight Transportation) is in the process of changing over to now. I don't know much about it yet, but management seems to be pretty fired up about it. Personally I think anything would be an improvement over the antiquated system we are using now. Even Western Express' very old system was advanced over the one I'm using in my Knight truck.

Sun King's Comment
member avatar
Rolling Thunder's Comment
member avatar

Here is the link to their site:

ZONAR EVIR (Electronic Vehicle Inspection Report)

I don`t know how to feel about this. I thought the requirement to send in inspection reports was going away unless a deficiency is found?

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