About Dem New Boots?

Topic 7355 | Page 1

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Mikki 's Comment
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Ok so I learned to drive in tennis shoes didn't want to spend any extra money til I graduated. Treated myself to a real nice pair of Redwings yesterday steel toed, mens. Breaking them in today having second thoughts, they seem pretty big and clunky. Plan on keeping my feet warm and dry and safe. What do ya think? Keep em or not?

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Hey Mikki, this has been an interesting discussion in this thread. I seriously would have never expected your original post to have garnered as much attention as it has, but it's fun to see a discussion develop in here the way they do sometimes. Of course since I am a husband and a father to three daughters, I know how important a discussion on foot wear can be, and how important it is to the ladies to have just the right shoes and hand-bag!

One thing I haven't seen mentioned in here is that there are some ladies work boots out there in the market, and some of them are very good. Okay, Mikki, don't tell anybody why I know about these ladies work boots, but I'm gonna let you in on one of my deepest secrets... are you ready for this? When it comes to work boots, I am a "cross dresser"! That's right, I have very narrow feet, and I discovered a long time ago that when available, ladies foot wear just fits me better, and a better fit means better comfort - I'm all for comfortable foot wear.

If you can find them you should check out Ariat brand boots. They have an extensive line of ladies work boots. If you can't find them at a retail store you can definitely order them on-line by searching the brand name.

As a flat-bedder I always keep a pair of steel toed boots with me in the truck, there are place we go that require them, and I have had several places check to make sure that I am wearing them when necessary. Other than the times that I'm required to wear them, they mostly are unused. For the most part I wear some Ariat slip on ankle high boots that I find to be both conveniently easy to get on and off while also being very comfortable. They are the type of boots that my grandfather called "Brogans". I drive in all different types of foot wear though, even just my socks a lot of the time.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

You can get used to anything. I understand that being a new driver you probably just want to get used to shifting and driving as fast as possible, but you'll eventually find that it doesn't really matter what you're wearing. I'm assuming you're asking from this angle. I wore sneakers when I first started my training, and then had to wear steel toe boots for my P&D (pickup and delivery) training. I wound up just keeping the boots on since I paid a decent amount for them and just figured that they'd be better in the rain anyhow - they're waterproof. I could see them getting hot during the summer, so I'll probably wind up switching back to something else, unless rain is in the forecast.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Jeff L.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

I Reckon those red wings need some time to get used to you, yep , yep. I used to mandatory(Steel toes) where I have worked at times and the best brands will be best for your feet. Heat, sweat, and concrete will take a tow on your feet in those situations, build up skin on the back heel and get corn or whatever on your big toe. I would keep them and switch out for comfort with other shoes. I would use a descent boot when I did manufacturing knowing they would comfort my feet, made by wolverine. Two pairs , one ankle lace ups and the other the boot type, I would change them out day to day so one pair would have recovery time to dry making them last longer. I still have them after two years or more(used saddle soap on them to preserve the leather. I would suggest having several pairs to your liking and usage. Be good to your feet and life will be good to you. Even think about a pair of boots that you can wade through water up to your knees if need, you will probably have to use them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Jolie R.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

Mikki I got me a pair of Redwing hiking boots and love them. They did take some getting used to but they are all I wear when I am on the road. Since I do a regional dedicated route I am in and out of my truck quite a bit and I like the stability and support they give me climbing in and out of my truck. I opted not to get the steel toed ones because I have only been one place that required them and that was when I was in training. You would never be able to tell mine aren't steel toed just by looking at them. Not sure what I will wear when the weather gets warm, but I have grown to love my boots.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

J.K.'s Comment
member avatar

Red Wings are a good brand (as evidenced by the price!) The only thing I don't like is steel toed. My toes get real cold and they are more restrictive in my opinion.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar

Are you asking us to make a decision for you, or if we think that you'll get used to them? I don't get the post. confused.gif

Mikki 's Comment
member avatar

Are you asking us to make a decision for you, or if we think that you'll get used to them? I don't get the post. confused.gif

Will I get used to them. Was it a good idea

Mikki 's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Are you asking us to make a decision for you, or if we think that you'll get used to them? I don't get the post. confused.gif

double-quotes-end.png

Will I get used to them. Was it a good idea

Or just go with immediate comfort.
The Dude's Comment
member avatar

You will get used to them if you want to, but most drivers prefer to drive with something more comfortable. I like lightweight running shoes. I keep a pair of heavy duty steel toe boots because many shippers require them on the flatbed side, plus if I have to tarp in inclement weather, but yeah, flatbed issue.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

6 string rhythm's Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

You can get used to anything. I understand that being a new driver you probably just want to get used to shifting and driving as fast as possible, but you'll eventually find that it doesn't really matter what you're wearing. I'm assuming you're asking from this angle. I wore sneakers when I first started my training, and then had to wear steel toe boots for my P&D (pickup and delivery) training. I wound up just keeping the boots on since I paid a decent amount for them and just figured that they'd be better in the rain anyhow - they're waterproof. I could see them getting hot during the summer, so I'll probably wind up switching back to something else, unless rain is in the forecast.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Jeff L.'s Comment
member avatar
Great Answer!

I Reckon those red wings need some time to get used to you, yep , yep. I used to mandatory(Steel toes) where I have worked at times and the best brands will be best for your feet. Heat, sweat, and concrete will take a tow on your feet in those situations, build up skin on the back heel and get corn or whatever on your big toe. I would keep them and switch out for comfort with other shoes. I would use a descent boot when I did manufacturing knowing they would comfort my feet, made by wolverine. Two pairs , one ankle lace ups and the other the boot type, I would change them out day to day so one pair would have recovery time to dry making them last longer. I still have them after two years or more(used saddle soap on them to preserve the leather. I would suggest having several pairs to your liking and usage. Be good to your feet and life will be good to you. Even think about a pair of boots that you can wade through water up to your knees if need, you will probably have to use them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Heavy C's Comment
member avatar

Being from Maine I prefer me some Beans boots. That would of course be only for times I'm buried in snow or working a lot outside. Other than that, driving the truck I would rather be just in a nice comfy pair of sneakers.

To each his own though. Hope you like them.

Scott O.'s Comment
member avatar

I was wear sandals year round and the two months I drove truck and trailer I wore yep you guessed it sandals lol and I put my shoes on when at shipper and receiver... When driving I like to be comfortable... Just my thought

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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