Slow Rolling To The Dock

Topic 7970 | Page 1

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Charles C.'s Comment
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When you guys/gals talk about slow rolling to the dock while on sleeper or off duty so as not to start your 14 hour clock, exactlly how slow do you have to go? {less than 5mph?} For example if the shipper wont let you stay on the property after being loaded ,could you creep down the road to park untill it was time?

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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2nd gear, no throttle. smile.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
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My mentor called it "put-put". The very low speed keeps the GPS from figuring you must be driving. Sometime you have to drive anyway.

One person said they would save their drive time switching to sleeper, but put-put out of the shipper's yard, cross the street and park in a Walmart lot.

My mentor and I ran out of time a mile from our planned truck stop. So, 5mph on the shoulder, hugging the curb crossing the bridge, and slowly into the parking lot. We "survived"!

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Deb R.'s Comment
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Our limit is less than 3 miles, and under 15 mph

Rolling Thunder's Comment
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Ours is below 25 and less than 2 miles.

ColeTrucker's Comment
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Ours is below 25 and less than 2 miles.

Same here.

Mini rant.......Now please someone "try" to tell me how in blu blazes is this practice safe? Yes, I know it was placed there for things such as finding a spot in a truck stop yadda, yadda, yadda. However, (many of us) I also use it for when I am "x" amount of miles away from my final destination AND out of drive time. Why o why isn't there some kind of code or whatever to use when we are say, 5 maybe10 miles away from our stop and out of hours? The mentioned can be proven via GPS so, what is the problem? Game on top of game. Makes too much sense maybe?

And if someone mentions "trip planning" slap yourself in the face for me. Rant complete.

Charles K.'s Comment
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Ours is below 25 and less than 2 miles.

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And if someone mentions "trip planning" slap yourself in the face for me.

LMAO.

Honestly, trip planning does have something contribute to better time of arrival, but there're always exceptions, like unpredictable traffic (eg: accidents), shipping/receiving detentions, etc.

Brett Aquila's Comment
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Straight out of the Exemptions To Hours Of Service Regulations in our High Road Training Program:

Adverse Driving Conditions Exception

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 additional hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. This means you could drive for up to 13 hours, which is 2 hours more than allowed under normal conditions. "Adverse driving conditions" means conditions that you did not know about when you began your trip like snow, fog, or a road closure due to a crash. Adverse driving conditions do not include situations that you should have known about through proper trip planning, such as congested traffic during typical "rush hour" periods. Even though you may drive 2 extra hours under this exception, you are not allowed to drive after the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty.

I've heard of companies that do not allow you to use this exception, probably because they abused it in the past and DOT has their eye on them.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

ColeTrucker's Comment
member avatar

Straight out of the Exemptions To Hours Of Service Regulations in our High Road Training Program:

double-quotes-start.png

Adverse Driving Conditions Exception

If unexpected adverse driving conditions slow you down, you may drive up to 2 additional hours to complete what could have been driven in normal conditions. This means you could drive for up to 13 hours, which is 2 hours more than allowed under normal conditions. "Adverse driving conditions" means conditions that you did not know about when you began your trip like snow, fog, or a road closure due to a crash. Adverse driving conditions do not include situations that you should have known about through proper trip planning, such as congested traffic during typical "rush hour" periods. Even though you may drive 2 extra hours under this exception, you are not allowed to drive after the 14th consecutive hour after coming on duty.

double-quotes-end.png

I've heard of companies that do not allow you to use this exception, probably because they abused it in the past and DOT has their eye on them.

So what you're saying is...I cant use that regulation just because the girl I wanted to do my mani/pedi wasn't available until after lunch and it is currently 10am?...............JUST KIDDING!!!

For real though, I had a run that was tight, 635miles deadhead from West Palm Beach, FL to Greenville, SC (truck governed at 63mph which only happens when the sun, moon and stars align AND I have a tail wind AND I am going down hill. Miles are zip to zip). Long story short...there was a crash in Jacksonville, FL AND construction going on. -

I was 7 miles away from the shipper when I ran out of drive time and had to slow roll to them at 2 something in the morning.

Backtracking a little....While I was in traffic, I called in to ask if I could go to line 4. They said no but, that little bit of time would have allowed me to get to the shipper with out having to slow roll!

I have since learned that I was a Jacka** b/c I should not have "asked" I should have "told" them or better yet, just go to line 4 b/c according to COMPANY policy, I had the right to go there while stuck in traffic. But, noooooooo I asked and got jacked b/c I didn't know company policy and FMRC regulation. Instead I relied <---did I spell that right? It looks funny- on someone else to tell me "their version" of the policy.

Not gonna happen twice!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

ColeTrucker's Comment
member avatar

BTW, I am on home time now going over EVERYTHING!

***Didn't mean to highjack your thread**** Carry on!

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