2 Week Notice With Schneider

Topic 8192 | Page 1

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CT Trucker 's Comment
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Hey everyone, I work for Schneider national doing a dedicated account in the NE area been here for 2 months. This week I was offered a local job with better pay looking to give them a 2 week notice but i was told if you leave they wont hired you back, how true is this ? And how should I go about giving this notice ? They are the first tractor trailer company I worked for so don't wanna burn a bridge. Thanks for all your help everyone

Chris

PanamaExpat's Comment
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No one should fault a man for wanting to better himself. That said... Make certain that the local you are looking at is a stable option. Your trepidation is understandable but it is your life, your future, and overall your happiness in your new career that matters most.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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I encourage you to stick with Schneider for at least your 6th month mark. Leaving after only 2 months at Schneider will be a poison to your work history for many, many years to come.

I'm thrilled you got a job offer, but also realize that you could get a much better job offer with 6 months experience. Also, if you signed a year contract with Schneider you'll be charged a hefty amount for the training you've received. Usually, at the 6th month mark that training fee will go down tremendously.

CT Trucker 's Comment
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I never signed any contract with them.I really do like working for them money is great and the training was amazing really wouldn't consider leaving but I'm not eating or sleeping right, I'm trip planning everyday and can't really take rest breaks to eat or use the rest room or pull over to nap when tired or I'll be late for my stop or the next day assignment, they just implemented 4 strike rule for lateness alot factors of why I'm considering leaving.

Daniel B.'s Comment
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Right, but also consider that you only have 2 months experience so maybe your trip planning skills aren't very good. There's almost always time to take a short nap, you just have to make time for it. I don't belief there's an excuse for not getting your proper rest. I mean, you're given 10 hours each day to use for resting. Sure, an hour or two is used for other things but that's still 8 hours to sleep. I ran 3,650 miles last week and I felt fine. Use that 10 hours cautiously and maximum your sleeping time.

No company can afford for their drivers to be late all the time. Your local company will be just as strict if not more strict about this. The grass isn't always greener on the other side.

Your trip planning will get better in time.

Pam J.'s Comment
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Right, but also consider that you only have 2 months experience so maybe your trip planning skills aren't very good. There's almost always time to take a short nap, you just have to make time for it. I don't belief there's an excuse for not getting your proper rest. I mean, you're given 10 hours each day to use for resting. Sure, an hour or two is used for other things but that's still 8 hours to sleep. I ran 3,650 miles last week and I felt fine. Use that 10 hours cautiously and maximum your sleeping time.

No company can afford for their drivers to be late all the time. Your local company will be just as strict if not more strict about this. The grass isn't always greener on the other side.

Your trip planning will get better in time.

No kidding. Trip planning really means double checking your dispatcher's work. They know what the customer needs. Drivers are the middle man. It's ultimately up to the driver, as the Captain of the ship, to see if it can be done.

I wouldn't want a dispatcher's job and I'm equally sure they wouldn't want mine.

Two heads are better than one. Maybe that's why they created the macro om Qualcomm on whether to accept or reject.

Think it through. Make sure you can deliver before you start counting the cash. Refusal isn't always bad.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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HackAttack, what kind of miles are you turning each week? Because I suspect it's like Daniel said, part of the problem is that your trip planning skills aren't very sharp yet.

I also agree that you should stick it out a little longer at least. Two months at your first job and out the door you go? What if you get in a fender bender at your new job in the second week and they let you go. Your resume is going to show you bailed on the first company after two months and then got in a fender bender right away after that. You're not exactly going to be considered a "gold prospect" by anyone. You'll have a heck of a time finding work anywhere.

I just don't like the idea of new drivers jumping ship right away. You barely know how many wheels are on an 18 wheeler and you're going to start jumping around from company to company?

No one should fault a man for wanting to better himself.

I completely agree. But will jumping ship on your first company after only two months make things better? It's awful risky in my book.

And how much pay is "better pay"? I mean, if you're certain you're going to make another $10,000 per year then that's pretty significant. Anything less than that and I think you're making a pretty risky move for very little gain.

Wilson's Comment
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HackAttack, I feel your pain. There is a learning curve to all this. When I was at Melton for my orientation, they told us there more than once, "Your first three to four months are going to really SUCK!" And you know what, they were right. I'm glad they told me up front and not try to candy-coat it. I am still making rookie mistakes at seven months, but a lot less now. Things are starting to gel and I am getting more and more proficient. I am constantly open for tips to make things even more proficient. You have got some really great advice in the previous posts and as for my 2 cents, stick with it. I have already made up my mind to stick it out for my first year. I have passed up offers that included time home and more money. I just want it on my record that I can do a year without incident(s).

The best time to take naps are on the straightaways; never on the curves! rofl-3.gif

Sorry, couldn't resist.

Bottom line is stick it out and you will get better at what you are doing. It won't happen over night, nor in 2 months. I think you will be better off in the long run by staying with them longer.

Michael V.'s Comment
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A you also have to remember that once you work local you will have to take a refresher course before you can go back over the road so be sure local is what you want.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Steve L.'s Comment
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Don't give up! If you're on dedicated every one of those stops has a restroom they'll let you use. Schneider doesn't allow split-berth breaks (8/2) so you should be getting your ten hour everyday. You need a mentor or confidant to bounce your concerns off of. I'm OTR so I may not be the best , but if you have a DBL/manager you get along well with or one of the Orientation Trainers you can call on do it. If you want, private message me your phone number & I'll call to see how I can help. I've only been driving since January but I'm willing to help. A friend recently quit Schneider after less than three months driving & is finding out he made a mistake. Also make sure the truck you're driving doesn't have an exhaust leak. That can cause fatigue & you'll find yourself tired even though you slept all night.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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Advice For New Truck Drivers Choosing A Trucking Company First Solo Months On The Road
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