Millis Transfer Driving School

Topic 9235 | Page 1

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Matthew H.'s Comment
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I've been really only considering one company sponsored training program (Roehl Transport) for awhile because its the program that seemed to be the best choice for me.

I just started looking into Millis Transfer's school (MTI) now. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with their school and/or works for them currently. I've read the information for MT on the TT but nothing beats "inside info".

Thank you!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

Ken S.'s Comment
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Me too matt every conversation i have with the wife always has roehl in it,she say's that is where i should go,mills or/even maverick are a close 2nd/3rd lets see what the others have to say

Matthew H.'s Comment
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Me too matt every conversation i have with the wife always has roehl in it,she say's that is where i should go,mills or/even maverick are a close 2nd/3rd lets see what the others have to say

Haha same here Ken! Every time my wife and I have talked, Roehl is the place to go.

I've read some posts on other websites that have said that Millis drivers have low miles each week. Granted those posts are a year old but its something to think about. I know they're a smaller company but I don't want to be sitting around and not driving.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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I've read some posts on other websites that have said that Millis drivers have low miles each week.

Impossible.

1) They wouldn't make any money

2) They wouldn't have any drivers

You can't compete in the arena of hauling freight if you're not hauling much freight. Now every major company will have a certain percentage of drivers that aren't getting good miles. Why? Because they haven't earned them. They are some combination of lazy, unreliable, or unprofessional. And somehow these same people have a gift for running their mouths everywhere they go and playing the blame game. Nothing is ever their fault of course so they go around bad-mouthing their company every chance they get.

Millis is an excellent company. They're hauling the same basic freight on the same roads using the same fuel under the same laws as everyone else. They're big, successful, and they've been around a long time. They'll have the miles available if you prove to them you can handle it. They wouldn't be where they're at today if that wasn't the case.

Matthew H.'s Comment
member avatar
double-quotes-start.png

I've read some posts on other websites that have said that Millis drivers have low miles each week.

double-quotes-end.png

Impossible.

1) They wouldn't make any money

2) They wouldn't have any drivers

You can't compete in the arena of hauling freight if you're not hauling much freight. Now every major company will have a certain percentage of drivers that aren't getting good miles. Why? Because they haven't earned them. They are some combination of lazy, unreliable, or unprofessional. And somehow these same people have a gift for running their mouths everywhere they go and playing the blame game. Nothing is ever their fault of course so they go around bad-mouthing their company every chance they get.

Millis is an excellent company. They're hauling the same basic freight on the same roads using the same fuel under the same laws as everyone else. They're big, successful, and they've been around a long time. They'll have the miles available if you prove to them you can handle it. They wouldn't be where they're at today if that wasn't the case.

You're absolutely right Brett!

I fell into the trap that I had been avoiding up until that point. I know better than to believe all the negativity. That's one of the things I love about the TT, the fairness. Until I came here, I read so many negative things about quite a few major carriers that it was rather discouraging. Now I do my research but take everything with grain of salt. I've actually managed to steer a few people your way too! Trucking Truth is a great place!

Photogirl 's Comment
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I went to school with Millis back in December and I'm still currently with them. I did switch from OTR to Texas regional and I love it!! Got a brand new kenworth automatic and the miles ares excellent. I make 50 cents a mile and I average 2000-2400 a week. I'm home every weekend. Millis does have the cameras and are dead serious about safety. You have to use a Bluetooth to talk on the phone however they do not like drivers talking on the phone all day. Regional is harder then OTR in my opinion. I usually do 2-3 loads a day. I was one of two people in my class and received excellent training. Mills hauls mostly beer, water and paper. My beer loads are usually 49 thousand plus pounds. It's heavy and it jerks you a lot all day. I love it here.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Photogirl 's Comment
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I almost forgot. Millis is putting in new LG tvs with dish network in all tractors. Free. 👍👍👍👍

Matthew H.'s Comment
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I almost forgot. Millis is putting in new LG tvs with dish network in all tractors. Free. 👍👍👍👍

Thanks for the input Photogirl! I appreciate it. You made quite the switch, Photography to Truck driving huh?

Good to have some input on Millis though. They have a terminal/yard not too far from me. That's one of the reasons I've been considering them.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Joe D.'s Comment
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I am headed to Millis on July 27th for training. I cant wait. Are they switching the whole fleet to autos Photogirl? I hope not.

tarheel59's Comment
member avatar

Hi, Millis does not have APUS. This is what recruiter told me, you can only idle at 10 degrees or below and 60 and above. They do have bunk heaters. They do have cameras in cab. tarheel59

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

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