Prime Guaranteed Pay

Topic 9577 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Sam C.'s Comment
member avatar

Hoping someone can clarify. Prime guarantees me 700 a week minimum while I'm tnt but my trainer is saying I won't get that the week he goes on his home time. He is taking the weekend of Aug 7th off for a concert. He is dropping me off at home while he's on his home time. Other drivers have stated that I should still get paid because it's not considered my home time, which is scheduled later that month. But my trainer insists that I won't get paid because he's the one paying me. So which is it? Am I entitled to be paid for that weekend or no?

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

The Dude's Comment
member avatar

If you are being dropped off at home and wish to do so, you are on home time without pay. If you wish to stay on the truck while your trainer is on home time, you are entitled to your pay. You won't both go home and get paid.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Sam, are you really arguing with your trainer about getting paid for sitting at home? Really?? That's what you're ready to take a stand over as a brand new driver in this industry? You're going to confront people in positions of authority, people directly responsible for both your pay and your training, about that sort of thing?

I highly suggest as a rookie driver you learn to keep things on the down low. If you're willing to argue over being paid for sitting at home that tells me you'll pretty much argue with anyone over anything, including dispatchers, load planners, safety managers, DOT officers, and all of the people that can make your life miserable and ruin your career in a big hurry. You get what I'm saying?

I understand they say you're guaranteed $700/week for working and I don't mind that you asked how the home time would effect your situation. But you're talking around to other drivers about it, arguing with your trainer about it, and will almost certainly make some phone calls about it if you haven't already.

Chill out and go with the flow. And stop expecting ridiculous things like getting paid to sit home. Get out there and earn your money, and stop giving people a hard time when they can make your life miserable. Because trust me, that kind of attitude and approach is going to send your career straight into a brick wall in a hurry.

You're a rookie truck driver. That makes you by far the most dangerous person on the highway and you're piloting an 80,000 pound death machine to boot. Keep your head where it needs to be before you wind up distracting yourself worrying about something stupid and killing someone's family.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
member avatar

Hoping someone can clarify. Prime guarantees me 700 a week minimum while I'm tnt but my trainer is saying I won't get that the week he goes on his home time. He is taking the weekend of Aug 7th off for a concert. He is dropping me off at home while he's on his home time. Other drivers have stated that I should still get paid because it's not considered my home time, which is scheduled later that month. But my trainer insists that I won't get paid because he's the one paying me. So which is it? Am I entitled to be paid for that weekend or no?

I was a TNT trainer for Prime when I drove for them. YES, the trainer is paying your $700/wk.

While he is at home, and you are at home (your home not his), then you are on home time and you do not get paid....PERIOD. You are on home time, not available to work. Now, if you call his fleet manager , and explain the situation, you will probably be given 2 options, sit home without pay or get transferred to another truck and keep rolling. If you take the second option, you will be transferred permanently to the other truck. So I would think long & hard on that choice. If you are getting along well with your trainer, I personally would just sit home, take my time, enjoy the break and keep my mouth shut about it.

As Brett pointed out, you are a new driver and looking to rock the boat about this. REALLY?????? In my opinion, you need to think long and hard about this line of thinking.

You are talking about a weekend, not a full week. Yes your paycheck will be smaller, but you will still get a paycheck.

While I was doing my TNT phase, my trainer was taking 2 full weeks off for the Christmas/New Years holidays. So I did request and was transferred to another truck for the duration of my training. But I knew what I was getting into when I did that. I gave my fleet manager plenty of time to look for another truck to transfer to. It had nothing to do with not getting along with my trainer, it had everything to do with not sitting at home for 2 weeks without getting paid. So again, think long and hard about requesting a transfer to another truck for something so minor.

Ernie

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar

Brett and Ernie, I think you guys are jumping the gun a bit and jumping to conclusions in jumping on this guy for "rocking the boat." He's not complaining, just confused and getting mixed information from other sources. I understand we get a lot of self-absorbed entitled knuckleheads through here, and it's easy to go into That Mode when a new guy makes a post dealing with driver pay, but it's not warranted here.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
it's not warranted here

Are you sure? Nobody is saying he's a bad guy. Here's what I'm saying........

I'll bet you if we tested him on the finer points of the logbook rules, cargo loading and securement, bridge laws by state, and fuel burnoff calculations he's got a long way to go, just like all rookies, correct? Of course.

If we gave him a Hazmat load to carry from Los Angeles to New York would he know the laws about where to keep the paperwork, where he can park and can not park that truck, how often he must do tire checks, and how to route himself around cities, bridges, and tunnels? If it was a heavy load could he calculate what percentage of his fuel weight goes on the steers versus the drives so he knows how much fuel he can put in and then calculate how far he can go to the next fuel stop?

It scares me when someone is supposed to be learning about how not to kill someone's family driving that 80,000 pound death machine but their conversations with other drivers, arguments with their trainer, and discussions in forums are centered around whether or not they're going to get paid for sitting at home two weeks from now.

Maybe I'm crazy, but when I was learning to drive the last thing I had on my mind was whether or not I'd be getting paid to sit at home in a few weeks. My mind was full of worries like sliding on ice, getting hit by a tornado, navigating Downtown Chicago during rush hour, and easing 80,000 pounds down a mountain without burning up my brakes and going off a cliff.

I'm sure he's a nice guy and all but his head is clearly not in the game. To me it's like someone having a 1,000 pound grizzly bear charging them at full speed from 50 yards away and all they're worried about is making a sandwich. Seems there are a lot bigger concerns right now, don't ya think???

Logbook:

A written or electronic record of a driver's duty status which must be maintained at all times. The driver records the amount of time spent driving, on-duty not driving, in the sleeper berth, or off duty. The enforcement of the Hours Of Service Rules (HOS) are based upon the entries put in a driver's logbook.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

DWI:

Driving While Intoxicated

Fatsquatch 's Comment
member avatar
Seems there are a lot bigger concerns right now, don't ya think???

BUT, he's not getting conflicting information about those concerns (or if he is, he hasn't shared that with us yet). Whatever questions he has about load securement, weights, hazmat , hills, and the eleventy billion and six other aspects of safe driving there are, those questions are being adequately addressed by his trainer and by Prime. In this case, he's getting multiple different answers from multiple people, and was seeking clarification. What he got instead was a lecture about priorities from people leaping wildly to the assumption that he's only focused on that one issue that he brought to the forum. Just because he didn't ask us about all those other things doesn't mean he isn't thinking about them and asking questions about them. It just means that the answers he's getting elsewhere are satisfactory and he isn't troubled by them.

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Joshua C.'s Comment
member avatar

Some of it is how Prime sells that point to people. I remember I as well as people in my class were somewhat unclear about exactly what that 700 guaranteed meant. I never brought home 700 after taxes but I got through it in about 6 weeks. We ran hard. I can speak for myself but let's just say money was very tight a

Joshua C.'s Comment
member avatar

Tight when I made the decision to come to prime and get into trucking. Weren't any other options either that pays what trucking pays. It took me about 3 weeks to get a trainer and you don't make anything during psd. 200 dollars that has to be paid back. So for about 6 weeks 7 days a week I didn't make one dollar. I was kind of expecting that 700 no matter what. Money is a definitely a big reason but for sure not the only reason I'm doing this 7 days a week away from home weeks at a time. But now getting closer to a year experience , I have lots of options where I'm home much more. Anyway that is my 2 cents since I did my training and work for prime. Enjoy those days off because I have never and I mean never not once complained about not getting miles working for and with prime

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Joshua C.'s Comment
member avatar

I should clarify that I was given 200 dollars weekly during psd that you pay back after you get your cdl

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More