On The Fence About Staying, Maybe Not For Me?

Topic 20665 | Page 2

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BQ 's Comment
member avatar

Sounds like you got yourself a ******bag of a trainer, who sees you more as a means to spin miles than an entry level driver he needs to bring up to speed with the several nuances of trucking.. as far as logging breaks, definitely not recommended while driving down road, regardless of traffic unless pull over to side, perfectly fine at receivers, waiting in line for fuel as long as the time it takes for actually fueling is logged within an hr of actual fuel time and for checking in/out of customers, applying loadlocks, handling paperwork, which can be lumped together into one block. I just went through trainers course myself and these were a few of the tidbits expressed by logs dept. For example, arrive for fuel but have line, go on duty for 8-11 mins to show fueling time, then go off until process of waiting, fueling, getting receipt and whatever else need from store is complete. When arrive at customer, log on duty for 7-10 min (few for ck in/out, few for docking and cpl for applying load locks), you can then go off duty until rolling again, unless you must be on dock during loading which should be logged on duty. If sitting in truck playing on phone, watching tv, etc there is absolutely no reason to be logged on duty. I also previously thought had to go on duty seperately for check in/out but that myth was pleasantly dispelled by our logs dept who explained all work at customer can be put into one block, thus providing an uninterrupted 30, split, 10 and on the rare occasion 34. Tough it out through tnt and the clouds will part when solo, if need be, talk to dispatch or training personnel about switching trainers, it will not be held against you.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

BQ 's Comment
member avatar

If you have to pull into a truck stop. Just pull through the fuel island and up to the yellow line. About 20 minutes from the time you pull off the interstate until you get back on.

Well I agree with most of what Big Scott said, this is one of the most annoying things some drivers do, particularly when pumps are busy. If not running in to grab fuel receipt and maybe something quick (beverage, already prepared food), find an actual parking spot. A driver may pull into fuel island and ready to roll in less than 10 mins (I don't lollygag when fueling, especially during drive hrs) and be annoyed, along with truck waiting behind him that they are being held up by a driver who didn't even fuel and is sitting in bathroom for 20 mins. Also, DO NOT take 30 in fuel island...

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

My TNT was less than ideal too, but I always kept my eye on the prize at the end. Thats what you should be focusing on now. Don't let this tiny fraction of time ruin your hopes or aspirations.

Unfortunately this is just another example of the larger issue at hand: Lease ops as trainers.

All too often, they get sucked into the lure of "being their own boss" and running the show, choosing their loads, bla bla bla. Then the reality sets in.... That lease payment never goes away or gets tired or wants hometime. That's when the lease operator starts listening to the "you should train" sales pitch. "Think of the money you can make."

So you now have a trainer whose sole motivation is getting more miles to help pad his/her pocket and make that lease payment. The trainee becomes nothing more than a cash cow.

I say this from experience. Although I got along with my TNT trainer, I can't say I learned a ton from him other than a few securement techniques that I already knew from my own studies. Mostly I was just there to drive the graveyard shift every night for 7 weeks.

Anyhoo, like the others have said, you ultimately control your own destiny out here. Just put your head down and get to work. Once you get your own rig the skies will clear. They always do.

You got this, driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14¢ per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ACO476's Comment
member avatar

If you need to go, stop and have a bathroom break. If your trainer has an issue with normal stops every few hours, you need another trainer.

^^^This^^^

When you're running the truck, you're running the truck. Need a bathroom break? Stop and take one. Your trainer is there to train you and not to force you to forego natural bodily functions. Talk to him or her and if you can't work it out, get another trainer. Do t give up though.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Buttercup,. As everyone else has already said, training is NOTHING LIKE being a solo driver. Please don't throw in the towel after you've worked so hard and come this far.

The fact is, once solo, you are the captain of your ship. As long as you make your deliveries and pickups safely and on time, you'll set your own drive schedule, rest breaks, and decide where you choose to take your 10 hour break when you do your trip planning. You'll discover those favorite places you love to stop at, maybe even adventure into in-truck cooking like I do.

On my breaks I read, watch TV, play online, cook, do artwork even. Yes, we do work hard and put in a lot of hours, but I know I'm rewarded for it and I bet most others feel the same way I do. I love the challenge, not having to punch a time clock, not having anyone breathing down your neck all the time like a traditional job. As long as you do your job well, nobody messes with you.. seriously.

Please talk to Rainy or even inquire about a different trainer if it just can't be worked out, but I bet if you stick to your guns and stop when you need to, just let them know you are a person and have basic human needs. If that doesn't work, then address it with whoever oversees your training.

Girl you've got this! If you have any questions at all that aren't getting answered by your trainer, please ask here. we are all cheering you on.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

If you have to pull into a truck stop. Just pull through the fuel island and up to the yellow line. About 20 minutes from the time you pull off the interstate until you get back on.

double-quotes-end.png

Well I agree with most of what Big Scott said, this is one of the most annoying things some drivers do, particularly when pumps are busy. If not running in to grab fuel receipt and maybe something quick (beverage, already prepared food), find an actual parking spot. A driver may pull into fuel island and ready to roll in less than 10 mins (I don't lollygag when fueling, especially during drive hrs) and be annoyed, along with truck waiting behind him that they are being held up by a driver who didn't even fuel and is sitting in bathroom for 20 mins. Also, DO NOT take 30 in fuel island...

I never hog a busy fuel island. However, if you are pulled to the yellow line, you can be in and gone before anyone comes behind you and finishes fueling.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Wow I get some extra sleep.then get summoned lol

Agreed what everyone else said..stick with it and go.solo. going solo terrified me.because my backing sucked so badly. I too felt like a driving monkey used for the miles at night. Lucky for.me i made a lot.of.friends while at the terminals. Get.phone numbers of other experienced drivers you can.call for.help once.solo. I put in my phone contacts whether they drove day or night and had help 24/7.

For now... have you talked about this stuff with your trainer and been clear? I know a trainee who quit the week before upgrade without talking to the trainer or FM about options. The major concern was home time and there were dedicated options once solo to get her home several times a week. When the trainer asked.questions about when she wanted to.go home.or.what shift.she wanted to.drive, the trainee would shrug and say "whatever is easier". But she already had a preference.she didn't articulate which made things difficult.for.her. the trainer was then frustrated thinking she did all she could.to.make training easier. Neither were happy in the end.

When you are.driving you are.in control. Stop in the fuel.aisle.and use the restroom. If the trainer is driving speak up and ask to.stop if the trainer grumbles then so what?

On the prime app there is a drop down that says "fuel book". This has a HUGE amount of info. Also, be sure to watch the various training videos on the app. Watch the weekly safety meetings. All.these things will help you feel.more.prepared.

Take a walk around sprimo when you upgrade to go talk to road assist, claims and safety. When you have people you have met face to face you feel.comfortable with to ask for.answers you will feel more at ease.

how many miles do.you have now? Do you have a date to head to sprimo?

I have to.trade.my truck soon...wpuld be cool to.meet up.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Parrothead66's Comment
member avatar

Did you stick it out?

Buttercup's Comment
member avatar

Still have 15k to go. :/ would be nice to meet up at some point! Still fairly frustrated with lack of sleep and the basic inconsiderate nonsense. I like driving, but...🤷🏻‍♀️ Trying to stick it out though.

Wow I get some extra sleep.then get summoned lol

Agreed what everyone else said..stick with it and go.solo. going solo terrified me.because my backing sucked so badly. I too felt like a driving monkey used for the miles at night. Lucky for.me i made a lot.of.friends while at the terminals. Get.phone numbers of other experienced drivers you can.call for.help once.solo. I put in my phone contacts whether they drove day or night and had help 24/7.

For now... have you talked about this stuff with your trainer and been clear? I know a trainee who quit the week before upgrade without talking to the trainer or FM about options. The major concern was home time and there were dedicated options once solo to get her home several times a week. When the trainer asked.questions about when she wanted to.go home.or.what shift.she wanted to.drive, the trainee would shrug and say "whatever is easier". But she already had a preference.she didn't articulate which made things difficult.for.her. the trainer was then frustrated thinking she did all she could.to.make training easier. Neither were happy in the end.

When you are.driving you are.in control. Stop in the fuel.aisle.and use the restroom. If the trainer is driving speak up and ask to.stop if the trainer grumbles then so what?

On the prime app there is a drop down that says "fuel book". This has a HUGE amount of info. Also, be sure to watch the various training videos on the app. Watch the weekly safety meetings. All.these things will help you feel.more.prepared.

Take a walk around sprimo when you upgrade to go talk to road assist, claims and safety. When you have people you have met face to face you feel.comfortable with to ask for.answers you will feel more at ease.

how many miles do.you have now? Do you have a date to head to sprimo?

I have to.trade.my truck soon...wpuld be cool to.meet up.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
Still have 15k to go.

Nice! That won't take long at all. Let me tell you, everyone here is really proud of you! There is nothing like going through something like you are, to really get to learn a few things about yourself. When you finish this first phase of your trucking experience you are going to find that you are capable of achieving much more than you thought you could. Trucking slaps almost all of us in the face at the beginning. Very few people ever enter this career with realistic expectations. We try like crazy to prepare folks for what they are about to face, but it is a difficult thing to convey from a keyboard.

Trucking is one of those careers that gets easier as you progress. There is just so much to learn at the onset of the career that it is absolutely overwhelming for many. That is why there are so many sad stories online of aborted trucking careers. It really does take some special people to do this job, and yet the career seems to attract a lot of people who were never cut out for the challenge.

Your tenacity is proving your worth, I was so glad to see this update from you. Hang in there - you've a whole group of folks here pulling for you. We've got a bunch of dancing bananas just waiting to be released when you give us the news that you are getting upgraded to your very own solo rig.

Stay the course - the challenge is great, but the final reward is even greater! Independence, adventure, and financial rewards are waiting for you.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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