Swifties: If You Get A TEXT About Trainee Back Pay From Swift

Topic 21193 | Page 2

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ChickieMonster's Comment
member avatar

I’ll go make the popcorn. Who wants some?

Tommy's Comment
member avatar

Big T, we are talking about complete different things. When you are driving solo, you are making your own decisions about how to make your own logs. When you are in the mentor’s truck, that mentor has power over you over what you do as far as safety and company regulations. I certainly hope that you can distinguish between the two.

The bottom line, pay when you are performing ON DUTY tasks when you are paid per hour. When you are paid per mile, then you can do whatever you want with the logs as long as you log legally.

I am not going to waste time reading it. Swift laid out the program and I agreed to that program.

Tommy I know you had a rough go with your first mentor, but I want to offer another way to look at it.

This only pertains to HOS , not the Qualcomm stuff. When I first started driving the whole "log what you do and do what you log" was spoken while safety and everyone else was winking and nodding.

Reality is I get paid to drive. I don't get paid to sweep trailers, get wash outs, do paperwork etc. So right or wrong, I am not going to log any time on line four that is not absolutely necessary. This is how I was taught originally and it is how I operate.

Is it "cheating"? Yes. Am I taking the risk of having DOT make an example of me? Yes. But in the end I make that choice. No one forces me to and I fully understand that if something goes wrong it will be my butt on the line.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

Tommy I completely understand what you were saying. I was just pointing out that the way he ran your clock is how I was taught. He was wrong to not let you do it. I chose to log that way with my mentors because any minute I logged on duty not driving was a minute I couldn't log as driving which prolonged my time on their truck.

I am going to take issue with your statement though. My mentor had absolutely no control on safety or company policy unless I gave him that control. I realize I was different than the rest of our class because I had already done this rodeo before, but students have to understand that when it comes to safety you are the final say. I don't care if it's a mentor, dm , or the vp telling me to do something. If it's not right then it is up to me to do the right thing. That is my license and my csa score.

That's not a dig at you or blaming you. That is for anyone else that is getting ready to start this journey.

Big T, we are talking about complete different things. When you are driving solo, you are making your own decisions about how to make your own logs. When you are in the mentor’s truck, that mentor has power over you over what you do as far as safety and company regulations. I certainly hope that you can distinguish between the two.

The bottom line, pay when you are performing ON DUTY tasks when you are paid per hour. When you are paid per mile, then you can do whatever you want with the logs as long as you log legally.

double-quotes-start.png

I am not going to waste time reading it. Swift laid out the program and I agreed to that program.

Tommy I know you had a rough go with your first mentor, but I want to offer another way to look at it.

This only pertains to HOS , not the Qualcomm stuff. When I first started driving the whole "log what you do and do what you log" was spoken while safety and everyone else was winking and nodding.

Reality is I get paid to drive. I don't get paid to sweep trailers, get wash outs, do paperwork etc. So right or wrong, I am not going to log any time on line four that is not absolutely necessary. This is how I was taught originally and it is how I operate.

Is it "cheating"? Yes. Am I taking the risk of having DOT make an example of me? Yes. But in the end I make that choice. No one forces me to and I fully understand that if something goes wrong it will be my butt on the line.

double-quotes-end.png

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I’ll go make the popcorn. Who wants some?

Thanks , but no thanks...still too busy trying to figure out the difference between 62mph and 65mph than to participate in a class action that only serves to line the pockets of the greedy attorneys.

Big T's Comment
member avatar

thank-you-2.gif

double-quotes-start.png

I’ll go make the popcorn. Who wants some?

double-quotes-end.png

Thanks , but no thanks...still too busy trying to figure out the difference between 62mph and 65mph than to participate in a class action that only serves to line the pockets of the greedy attorneys.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

On the flip side, just signing up for the class action, whether you agree or not, you should get a token payment.

Remember, juries are rarely made up of mostly truckers who understand the situation.

MC1371's Comment
member avatar

To echo G Town.

Not even worth the effort. It's a shakedown lawsuit.

At best the lawyers are looking for a quick settlement. 80% of that will go to the lawyers for fees and expenses. Actual driver payout might be $20

JakeBreak's Comment
member avatar

I agree with big t when I was paid by the mile I spent as little time on duty as possible. If I could get away with it I wouldn't have logged anything other than driving, but since I had to log pretrip and fuel and customer stuff I did as quick as possible. Trailer sweeping/ washout were always off duty, same with trip planning and everything else i could get away with. Legal, no definitely not but I never got talked to about my logs.

John M.'s Comment
member avatar

I’ll go make the popcorn. Who wants some?

Oh, oh me!

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