Parking At A Truck Stop, Back In Or Nose In?

Topic 10537 | Page 2

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Dave D. (Armyman)'s Comment
member avatar

So yeah, I think the general consensus is "just don't do it." I'm of the opinion that the only people who nose in are those who are too scared or unskilled to back in. It just looks ridiculous to see a set of trailer doors next to all these other tractor hoods.

Only nose in if both sides of the parking row are open so you can still pull out forward.

I only did it one other time, I parked behind another Navajo truck (at the Iowa 80, in Walcott) and we were going to the same place, and we're leaving at the same time. Other than that, no I don't nose in.

Dave

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Pick/Grin's Comment
member avatar

I was told that it's not laziness to look for the easy spots. The less you have to turn the wheel when it comes to parking, the less likely you are to hit another driver.

I would rather spend 15 minutes the night before trying to line up my trailer with a hole, than roll out completely blind. The truck pivots on your fifth wheel, so I would imagine it's a lot more difficult with that point being so much further in the spot.

Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
member avatar

Ive parked nose in a few times,only in spaces,at end of a row,with no spaces,behind the truck.usually at a truck stop,with limited spaces,where I don't want to blind side,or turn around,and lose a space.some times easier to back out in daylight.Dont find many spaces or opportunity,for nose in parking..but they are out there.

SafeKing's Comment
member avatar

Well just my opinion but the truck stop for a new driver is sort of the first hurdle if your new i say you gotta back it in at least at the stop they have lines on the road you can usually find a spot 2 trucks wide and your reward is food bathroom shower....but if your new tired or just dont want the drama I suggest not parking in the truck stop unless you plan to back in because nose in unless you know what your doing creates a hazard and not every driver is smart enough to avoid a hazard some would simply rather not have to avoid it just advise dont park in a wmart parklot or gas station if you've done it you'll understand what i mean good luck

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

I was told that it's not laziness to look for the easy spots. The less you have to turn the wheel when it comes to parking, the less likely you are to hit another driver.

I would rather spend 15 minutes the night before trying to line up my trailer with a hole, than roll out completely blind. The truck pivots on your fifth wheel, so I would imagine it's a lot more difficult with that point being so much further in the spot.

I'll always look for the easy spots. I'll also try to think about once it gets later in the evening, where are drivers just going to park that isn't a parking spot and how hard will it be to get around them in the morning. Especially with winter coming on, it can be a free for all just to find a place to set the brakes. Smith System counts in the truck stops too, always leave yourself an out.

Phox's Comment
member avatar

I don't think everyone who goes nose in does it because it's easier than back but because they're afraid of someone else hitting there truck. if someone hits your trailer it's less of a big deal... you can get a new empty trailer brought to you possibly even still use the trailer depending on how badly hit. if your truck gets hit by someone though that could you put you out of work for multiple days (maybe weeks) and I doubt the pay for being out of work is going to be as good as the money you would make driving. This is especially true if you are o/o or lease (just one more reason why TT doesn't recommend going that route)

The tips I have seen from others is to nose in and park as far from the conveniences as possible. Those are your best chances of saving truck from major damage from a rookie driver (or experienced having a bad day)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
pto driver's Comment
member avatar

Back in the day, everyone backed in at truck stops, I leave otr driving for a few years and come back and see trucks nosed in , stupidest thing I've ever seen LMAO.......

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bill F.'s Comment
member avatar

Any risk reduction of tractor damage, gained by nosing in, is more than evened out by an increased likelihood of trailer damage backing out.

If some idiot hits me pulling out it is their fault. If I hit someone backing out it is my fault.

I would prefer the increased chance of getting hit over an increased chance of being the hitter.

Just back in like you are expected to do.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Back in the day, everyone backed in at truck stops, I leave otr driving for a few years and come back and see trucks nosed in , stupidest thing I've ever seen LMAO.......

As I said earlier on this topic, you'll have a problem if your trailer-bend changes when you drive in. Backing out, you'll have a problem duplicating that on your way back out.

All these newer, lazier drivers! (I can say that, I've been driving for two years already!)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Kevin H.'s Comment
member avatar

I think I'm the infamous noser inner of the forum. Didn't realize there was an older thread. Anyway, i do it to reduce noise, and people are welcome to think it's stupid or i can't back, i don't care.

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