My Short Journey With Schneider Is Over -- I Am The Fool

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Second Chance's Comment
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I had a ridiculous time last week. I felt like my DBL was trying to make my life difficult and I don't know why. My work flow seemed to be out of order compared to the night support. I got chewed out for delivering a Shoprite store relay several hours late. When this assignment was added, I called my DBL before I left to tell him that it was way passed the appointed time for delivery. I was told to do it anyway, so I excepted it as my first assignment since it was number 1 on workflow. The night support shift didn't understand why I never started the assignment for Flemington and Costco. Every time I called for support I had to explain this again, and some understood. When I got to Shoprite in Chester I had trouble figuring out how to get behind the store. I called them for directions and after I got turned around I made it in.

My father-in-law is a OP for Wakefern, and He said I have no clue why they would send me to a store where it's difficult to even get a 48 foot in as a brand new driver. I had to unhook my trailer, hook up to a shoprite 48 foot after it was unloaded, and move it so I can get my Schneider trailer in. I had to do a 9o degree blind side in an extremely tight spot. I did get it in on my second pull up, if you can call it a pull up (thank God for GOAL). After I docked the receiver that told me to dock there, went home without telling me. No one was left at the store to unload me, except the night stockers. I found a worker who agreed to help, and got the 27 pallets for that store unloaded. Filled out the paper work, finally got to my second shoprite store in Staten Island by 0200 I believe. That place was just as crazy but, I did a back into the only available spot, dropped the trailer finished the paperwork and left the cosignee bill of laden with the trailer. I booked out of there before I could run into more problems. I called support and they were upset I did not deliver the load by 1400 hours. I tried explaining I am slip seating and did not even start to 1630 hours when I accepted the assignment. He then informed me I still had to do Flemington's load at least. I said my DOT hours are up. I updated my ETA, went to my next location and called support -- they said take your 10 hour.

I was delivering paper products and tide, my account is supposed to be nothing but pallets. Needless to say I was trained on a completely different experience and was lost. I also got lost in NYC! I hate it there! I delivered got home safely, hadno sleep an quit. I feel like a fool for quitting. Many of you had worse situations then this, and so much more happened last night. I deliver pallets to warehouses not product to tiny stores. Either way, I showed my character by quitting or lack there of. I wish I could take it back and push through. I can't. I am scheduled for covenant transport. I am determined to get my career off the ground. I do miss the truck!

One last note, Schneider seems to give you little driving time, then throws you out in the real world. I believe you need much more trainer driving time. I drove less then 1000 miles with Schneider before I hit the city streets of jersey and NYC. They are a good company though, and I would never bash them. Just keep in mind, you will go through it from the start and if your tuff enough you will get it going. My co-drivers were in shock they started me out like this. They do say we start you slow. Not me. I was doing high priority loads instead of pallets. It is okay though! I should have stuck it out like a real man!

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Old School's Comment
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I felt like my DBL was trying to make my life difficult and I don't know why.

Wow, you did have a rough start, but I wish you would have stuck with it a little longer. Here's why: What you experienced was extreme, especially for a rookie, but the way you expressed your feeling about it in that sentence I quoted could be said by a thousand new rookie drivers. For all of the new folks in here reading about "I need a C.B. Handle's" experience, don't let it frighten you, but let it be a reminder that breaking into a trucking career is tough, sometimes it is really tough. But it's not just tough because they want to make sure you have a rough start, it is just tough because it is so completely different and more challenging on a daily basis than anything else most of us have done for a living. It sounds like you were on a difficult job assignment in a difficult area, but if that is where you're going to be working then there is no time like the present to get into it. Schneider does have a short training time, but it is usually sufficient and they understand that you are going to make some mistakes. I don't know if this is a division that you chose so that you could be home more often and regularly or what - you mentioned that you were slip-seating, which indicates the type of job that is usually done by the more experienced drivers. If that is the case, you probably have a much better understanding of why you might be better off having a year of OTR experience before jumping into something like that.

You now know what it is like to take a course at the "University of Hard Knocks." Don't beat yourself up too badly for this false start, but get back into the drivers seat somewhere and "take the bull by the horns." I've got a doctorate degree from that university, and I can tell you that the best thing to do is get right back at it, don't fool around licking your wounds. I am curious why you chose Covenant - I'm assuming you thought team driving might be beneficial to you as a rookie. It may be, but it also has a whole host of other problems that go with the territory. Hopefully you know what you are getting into and will make some good progress on your career.

I wish you the best, and would love for you to keep us posted. There are a lot of new drivers in here who could benefit from hearing about your progress. Your story will help many of them realize just how tough and challenging this can be, and I hope we will all get to hear of how you overcame your obstacles and made a success out of this new career. Keep on trucking, and I have a feeling your experiences may just help formulate a new C.B. handle for you one day soon.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yeah, unfortunately your hindsight is correct. You certainly should not have quit a job because one day didn't go as you had hoped. I've always had a rule that I never make major decisions during tough or emotional times. Like if you're considering quitting a job you never do it on a bad day. You don't quit after a long, tough day where you got in an argument with the boss and it's 38 degrees and raining outside. You wait until you're having a great day, work is fun, the sun is shining, it's 70 degrees outside, and you have big plans for a great weekend coming up.

Make big decisions on good days and try to keep a handle on your emotions. It's easy in trucking to get aggravated with something little and have it spiral out of control in a hurry. And remember, circumstances are only temporary and the toughest circumstances always make the most enjoyable stories to tell. Even this circumstance is a story you'll be telling people for many years. Unfortunately it ends with you quitting your job, but hopefully that will make for a great lesson you can attach to a great story.

Jetguy's Comment
member avatar

WOW- CB handle- tough first day.

Oldschool and Brett- very glad you responded- "To sum it up- a very rough first day, but do not quit"

And- From CB handles writing- "CB Handle followed instructions, got the Shoprite store(s) delivered, it took a while for various reasons, problem with Flemington and Costco is DISPATCHERS" mistake, it ABSOLUTELY is not CB Handles mistake, Dispatchers are the ones who screwed up, Dispatchers are the ones that had a bad work shift." Also CB Handle might have communicated more with dispatch- I really don't know if that is the case- He talked to more than one person in dispatch.

Anyway I'm considering Schneider- I'm looking at a regional route out of St Louis- 6/3 for hometime, so this thread bothered me. But I look at it, that there will be bad days. It is very crummy that this happened on the first day- But that's life.

Also- CB handle did not hit anything or get a ticket- so in that respect- it was a good day.

CB Handle:

This is the nickname people use on the CB

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dennis R. (Greatest Drive's Comment
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Little advice driver,in the future,just ask the yard jockey for help,give him $5-$10 for helping you out. Makes a great impression.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Little advice driver,in the future,just ask the yard jockey for help,give him $5-$10 for helping you out. Makes a great impression.

I think the OP was attempting to dock and spot trailers on a retail store dock (re: Shoprite),...there are no yard jockeys.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm sorry you quit. I hope it works out at Covenant.

I drive for Schneider and make no excuses for dispatchers, but I sure want to be surrounded by good drivers and it sounds like you were so close.

I'm OTR so my experience has been much different, but early on they had me do some store deliveries with multiple stops. In the snow on Saturday night in Cincinnati was no fun either. But today I get better loads and miles.

Good luck!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Second Chance's Comment
member avatar

I thank you guys for the replies! I thought I was complaining over small stuff! I love the advice, and I agree 110% that I chose a horrible time to make a decision. I should have definitely slept first, and pushed through. What is so frustrating is the fact on my way to my first stop I was so excited I was on my own and doing this. I was having a blast.

There was no yard jockey it was a Shoprite Store. A tiny one...lol. They were not accepting deliveries but I was told to go there anyway. Receiver said he would take it, then he went home after he told me to dock. What the heck man?! I ended up being part yard jockey, and part lumper, but I wanted to make this work so someone couldn't say that I didn't do my job as best as I could.

My advice to new drivers like me is don't give up, it will get better. It might be a culture shock, but if you want it -- go get it!

I went with Covenant because of the teams. Will this false start with Schneider ruin my chances with these companies? Last I heard from Covenant was they were waiting on a verification from my school to so I can set up for orientation. I honestly was hoping to be there by Monday and on the road again by Thursday. I hope it does not drag on another week. I also went with Covenant because I don't hear a lot about them, and that could be a good thing. They do dispatch to NYC, but I think it will be good. I can go local after I get a year of solid experience in. Who knows maybe I'll love OTR and stick to it. I know after my time teaming I can switch to solo if they have a truck available through Star. Plus they will pay for my Hazmat.

I wa s looking at Swift and US Express as well, but hoping Covenant will work out.

Again thank you guys for the encouragement and advice. I see where I should have done things differently and you guys made me feel better then a complete fool๐Ÿ˜

HAZMAT:

Hazardous Materials

Explosive, flammable, poisonous or otherwise potentially dangerous cargo. Large amounts of especially hazardous cargo are required to be placarded under HAZMAT regulations

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Second Chance's Comment
member avatar

I talked to my DBL at Schneider today. He told me I should reapply and make sure I talk with my recruiter. I did and waiting to hear what can be done if anything. I am definitely not going back to the same account. I rather team OTR before I go solo. I am thinking if I run into it, I'll have someone to bounce ideas off of and vice verse if need be. I would rather stay with the company I started with instead of bouncing around. If this works out it will be God sent! I know that Schneider teams get priority over loads, and get newer equipment. That's always a plus๐Ÿ˜ I also think you can choose a automatic which I would imagine for new drivers, means more restful sleep with the smoother shifting. I am praying it works out!

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Second Chance's Comment
member avatar

I am so excited! I received a call from my recruiter at Schneider today and they are letting me reapply and hiring me back. She said you are starting with a clean slate as if this never happened. She thanked me for apologizing and taking some of the responsibility and apologized too for the week I had! That tells me alot about the company and I am more then happy to go back. They said to apply for any position you want. I applied for team OTR. I just have to go to Carlisle and re-take my SQT's for DOT. Not the orientation just the testing. I am so excited๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿค‘๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜‚

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

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