Worked For Roehl, Questions Concerning Their Contract (75k+ Miles)

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Pick/Grin's Comment
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It's a little late in the day for me to go calling them, but how legally binding is this contract exactly? I've received a bill from Alliance Collection Agencies to the tune of $4,630.

No, I did not complete the 75k miles, and yes, I acknowledge that housing me for training and all does cost money. I understand that the company is trying to recoup losses, but I'd like to collect as much info as possible before I go sending anyone money.

So, does anyone have any experience with this? I'm back home for good, trying to get into local work, and this sizable bill will definitely be a set back.

Brian M.'s Comment
member avatar

Unfortunately it sounds as if you are really in a bind. Without seeing the contract myself I would be hesitant on giving you a concrete answer. Contracts like these are generally one sided without many loopholes. They have decided to take it to collection which is most likely in there rights. First thing you should do is pull your credit report to see if they reported it to them. Bad credit can hurt almost every aspect of your life for many years. I would also see if you can reduce the amount they are seeking. It would be easier to settle than to fight it. Also if it is on your report make sure to write letters to the agency's disputing the claim, then make it part of the negotiations in settling the matter. Good luck

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It's a little late in the day for me to go calling them, but how legally binding is this contract exactly? I've received a bill from Alliance Collection Agencies to the tune of $4,630.

No, I did not complete the 75k miles, and yes, I acknowledge that housing me for training and all does cost money. I understand that the company is trying to recoup losses, but I'd like to collect as much info as possible before I go sending anyone money.

So, does anyone have any experience with this? I'm back home for good, trying to get into local work, and this sizable bill will definitely be a set back.

A fully executed contract is a legally binding agreement requiring you to meet your documented obligations.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Like Brian said, without seeing the contract it's difficult to determine what you are on the hook for. If in fact you do the money, contact the collection company and attempt to negotiate a reasonable payment plan. That may be your only option.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Out of curiosity, what happened at Roehl that you weren't able to complete your 75k? A roehl recruiter came to my school today. Although I knew most of the info, he only briefly mentioned the contract however. I plan on staying at my company for a year or 2 regardless.

>>--HuntinDoug-->'s Comment
member avatar

I signed up at a local CDL school today... start tomorrow. I was set up to start at Roehl's CDL school on Feb 8th, but something just didnt feel right about it, so I went local.

When I was going over the paperwork today, I noticed the CLD school had info on 30 companies, but not for Roehl. When I asked them why, they said they no longer let Roehl recruiters come in due to the fact that they require new hires to sign a contract. I found that interesting.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
MotherTruckerKen's Comment
member avatar

I signed up at a local CDL school today... start tomorrow. I was set up to start at Roehl's CDL school on Feb 8th, but something just didnt feel right about it, so I went local.

When I was going over the paperwork today, I noticed the CLD school had info on 30 companies, but not for Roehl. When I asked them why, they said they no longer let Roehl recruiters come in due to the fact that they require new hires to sign a contract. I found that interesting.

I know the feeling, I agree with going to a local private school as well I just like it better and feel more comfortable with it. It's crazy to hear this because Roehl was my first choice of school at first.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pick/Grin's Comment
member avatar

Out of curiosity, what happened at Roehl that you weren't able to complete your 75k? A roehl recruiter came to my school today. Although I knew most of the info, he only briefly mentioned the contract however. I plan on staying at my company for a year or 2 regardless.

Nothing "happened", but after doing the math and comparing it to other professions, I figure it wasn't worth the pay.

32 cpm at 2000 miles comes out to $640, 2500 = $800, 3000 = $960. I could get 3000 a week with a bit of effort, though my goal was 2800 and my dispatchers kept me moving. With our 70 work hours: if I run on recaps and use 65 of those hours (legally) while maintaining my goal, I'll make roughly $13.78 an hour, with no over-time of course. Granted, you don't make that if you don't conserve your clock, and that's if you don't mind getting zilch while sleeping in subzero temperatures on the other coast, literally across the country. My diet is very limited, no bed, no human contact, adverse weather on a constant basis, I'm making very little money, and my free time is still limited to the cab (still AT work regardless of duty status).

Locally, if I make $12.50 and work 60 hours, I'll make $1000. I was good driving OTR , and I actually enjoyed it. I made appointments early, never turned down a load, and was generally treated well by Roehl. I don't hold it against them with this breach in contract, but when you work for three weeks at a time and make out with such a dismal amount of money, you start to consider other types of CMV work. Plus, I'm only 22 so I really don't mind the physical aspect of local work.

Anyway, if I don't have an out with this contract, I guess I'll just have to pay it. If you guys have questions, feel free to ask, regarding Roehl or OTR work in general.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
The Persian Conversion's Comment
member avatar
Locally, if I make $12.50 and work 60 hours, I'll make $1000.

Actually, working 60 hours at $12.50 would yield $750. Unless you're getting time and a half for hours over 40, in which case you'd get $875. Or do live somewhere where you get double pay for overtime or something?

Regardless, it sounds like the OTR lifestyle just wasn't for you. Many of the supposed "drawbacks" you mentioned, I consider "perks." Like sleeping across the country in subzero temps. It's an adventure to tell my grandkids about someday. Besides, it's kind of fun to have your own little private, cozy shelter against the elements.

And I don't really mind making "$13.78/hour" or whatever I make, especially when I have the opportunity to work 70 hours in a week. What else am I gonna do while I'm out here anyway? Play video games? Nah. Work is good for the soul.

Many people in this country are struggling to find a job that lets you work even 40 hours, let alone get overtime. Personally, I'd rather work 70 hours for $14/hr than 40 hours for $20/hr.

So anyway, I'm glad you found out that it wasn't for you, but man, I would have just completed the contract before leaving. 75k miles is like 6 months, no big deal. Now you're probably in a worse position than you would have been if you had just stayed and left after your contract was complete, right?

Sorry, not trying to rag on you, but this is a vital lesson for everyone thinking about doing what you did. It's just not worth it.

Best of luck to you.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

So anyway, I'm glad you found out that it wasn't for you, but man, I would have just completed the contract before leaving. 75k miles is like 6 months, no big deal. Now you're probably in a worse position than you would have been if you had just stayed and left after your contract was complete, right?

Sorry, not trying to rag on you, but this is a vital lesson for everyone thinking about doing what you did. It's just not worth it.

Yeah, I agree 100%. You agreed to the contract and they apparently fulfilled their end of it so you're on the hook for your end.

You also said:

Nothing "happened", but after doing the math and comparing it to other professions, I figure it wasn't worth the pay.

You probably know what I'm going to say.....that math should have been done before you made the commitment to get started in the industry.

The biggest problem I'm seeing is that you're making impulsive decisions. You're not thinking things through before you act.

  • Why didn't you do the math before you got started in this profession?
  • Why didn't you fulfill the rest of that relatively short contract before moving on so you didn't owe all that money?
  • Why didn't you line up a new job before quitting your last one?
  • Why is your contract in collections and why are you considering not paying it when that's going to hurt your credit in the future?

You're super young yet so all of this is part of the learning process. In the future, think things through and do your research before making decisions. There's nothing wrong with not wanting to live on the road. No one will fault someone for saying that's not their cup of tea. But obviously you've made a series of decisions that weren't well thought out and that has you in a bit of a pickle.

Anyway, if I don't have an out with this contract, I guess I'll just have to pay it.

To be honest, I'm not sure why you would be looking for an out with the contract. You agreed to it, they fulfilled their end of it, and it cost them a ton of time, money, equipment, and other resources to bring you on board and train you. Then you quit on them, they didn't quit on you. So you not only owe the money legally, but you owe it morally also. So I would say the smart thing to do is pay it. Otherwise the decision not to pay it is almost certainly going to go against your credit and cause even more problems in the future. Making short term decisions that hurt your future is what caused this mess in the first place so don't let that happen any more.

I don't mean to come down hard on you either but I did want to point this stuff out so you can see what's happening here. If you make decisions that help you in the short term but hurt you down the road they pile up pretty quickly and suddenly you realize you're now stuck living in the future you kept mortgaging with shortsighted decisions.

Think long term. Take your time when making decisions. Pay off the debt you owe to Roehl.

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