Eye Candy

Topic 13932 | Page 21

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Rookie Doyenne's Comment
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Actually, I guess in a blizzard, where else would a driver go? Duuuuhhh, kinda answered my own question...... what a picture, tho.

Note to self: 5-6 days rations/water during winter season.....

PackRat's Comment
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0038478001580246639.jpg0404814001580246858.jpg0290004001580246944.jpg

Here's one from today. I'm at a pallet mill in Lagrange, GA and spotted this 1970s Peterbilt "yard truck". It has an FMCSA inspection sticker from 2007 on the door frame.

CSA:

Compliance, Safety, Accountability (CSA)

The CSA is a Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) initiative to improve large truck and bus safety and ultimately reduce crashes, injuries, and fatalities that are related to commercial motor vehicle

FMCSA:

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration

The FMCSA was established within the Department of Transportation on January 1, 2000. Their primary mission is to prevent commercial motor vehicle-related fatalities and injuries.

What Does The FMCSA Do?

  • Commercial Drivers' Licenses
  • Data and Analysis
  • Regulatory Compliance and Enforcement
  • Research and Technology
  • Safety Assistance
  • Support and Information Sharing

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

0467587001580092721.jpg

I parked next to this truck at the Gateway Pilot truck stop in East St. Louis, IL this morning. Nothing really special about this Freightliner, until you look closer at the graphics. 3 Million Safe Miles is an amazing accomplishment!

3,000,000 miles? That can't be true. Everyone knows that nobody would stay with a "starter" company that long. Dont you know they take advantage of their drivers?

smile.gif

I couldn't help myself.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Annie wrote:

It's just SO incredible how you know your stuff, G~! ;) (Wasn't the ole' Petey pretty, though?) << I learned how to drive in that gal..that is our driveway. Legalities nonewithstanding, haha!!!

And here, I thought it was a FL/White... what do 'I' know?!? Just an aspiring (starving) artist, LoL~!

Thank you Annie, that is so thoughtful of you to say.

My love of trucks and trucking began a very long time ago, having the innate ability to differentiate a Mack B-61 from a White 9000 before I could add and subtract. I was an odd kid. I had every book written on the subject, and also had the benefit of my Dad who was a printer working for a company that did advertising high-quality brochures for numerous heavy truck manufacturers of the 60's and 70's. He always brought home the proofs for me to look at and study. My most memorable event as a kid was a trip to one of his customers, the Autocar assembly plant in Exton PA. I wish I could find the photos he took of me that captured the sheer delight on my face.

No idea why, but I could not get enough of it then,...and still can't. I totally enjoy sharing my knowledge with others of like-mind, similar interest, and curiosity. I do not consider it exceptional or even incredible, just a part of my DNA with no explanation of how it happened.

"Yes" Annie, your Petey was one cool ride and seriously "purdie". It's great you had an opportunity to drive an iconic part of trucking history. Although I appreciate all of the Pete models, for me the "small window" 359 conventional of the late 60's and early 70's epitomizes the hey-day of the long-nose, large grill conventional. When I have more time I'll post some of my favorite Petey Pictures; with restored examples from the 50s through the 80s.

Be safe everyone. Peace.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Saw this beauty at a TA just West of Phoenix. It is parked in a special area just outside the store. I think it is there to advertise a new Western Star model.

0519610001580330513.jpg0383987001580330570.jpg

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

That up above is not new. It's a 2018. Saw this around the other side of it.

0663029001580331843.jpg

PackRat's Comment
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I'm buddy's with the driver, Doc Osbourne.

The TA in Boise, ID has his name on it for being named a Citizen Driver Award by TA/Petro a few years ago.

G-Town's Comment
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My favorite “small window” Pete Conventional trucks.

Early 70’s 359 0073348001580570148.jpg

1960-62 351 0232990001580570216.jpg

1963 351 needle-nose day cab 0989361001580570413.jpg

1967-68 big grill 359. 0422921001580570517.jpg

1972 359 Dump truck 0403403001580571043.jpg

Late 1930s - early1940s 334. This is when they were built by T.A. Peterman, a Washington lumberman who In the late 20s began rebuilding surplus military equipment to haul his building products to market. Thus “Peterbilt” 0449335001580571318.jpg

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Anne A. (G13MomCat)'s Comment
member avatar

Hi Annie! You did write "get the driver out"..... is that why the National Guard - to extract a person, not just dig out the rig ?!?!?!shocked.png

When I first saw that picture I wondered if the driver left at some point or got avalanched in!

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Holy Cow that's a lot of snow!

Did they get it out of the snow before July?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Haha, yep~! National Guard finally came through. The rig was just up the road from Mansfield/Lahm Airport (Guard reserves station) yet it took them SIX days (or five, depending on who you ask) to get the driver out.

0044073001580230816.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

They first retrieved the starving driver, and eventually the rig. Boy he was a happy camper; they even gave him a cigarette. He was saving his last 1/2 of one for his hopefully upcoming rescue. (Good note to self, R.Doyenne, for sure~!)

G'Town and PackRat.. and all you contributors; I've got to say this is my favorite thread on here~!! ( I 'do' miss the musings on Flatbed Variety; thinking Old School needs to share more photos, haha!)

Blizzard of 1978

^^ Many more photos on this link ^^ for your perusal, R.Doyenne, et al. :)

Rookie Doyenne's Comment
member avatar

Agreed, Annie, this is a fabulous thread! Thanks for the link. I'm recalling some of those "wow" blizzard years way back, like that one.... these pics really make a tangible, sobering reality to connect to in a new way, awareness of extreme weather hazards OTR.....

double-quotes-start.png

Hi Annie! You did write "get the driver out"..... is that why the National Guard - to extract a person, not just dig out the rig ?!?!?!shocked.png

When I first saw that picture I wondered if the driver left at some point or got avalanched in!

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Holy Cow that's a lot of snow!

Did they get it out of the snow before July?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Haha, yep~! National Guard finally came through. The rig was just up the road from Mansfield/Lahm Airport (Guard reserves station) yet it took them SIX days (or five, depending on who you ask) to get the driver out.

0044073001580230816.jpg

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

They first retrieved the starving driver, and eventually the rig. Boy he was a happy camper; they even gave him a cigarette. He was saving his last 1/2 of one for his hopefully upcoming rescue. (Good note to self, R.Doyenne, for sure~!)

G'Town and PackRat.. and all you contributors; I've got to say this is my favorite thread on here~!! ( I 'do' miss the musings on Flatbed Variety; thinking Old School needs to share more photos, haha!)

Blizzard of 1978

^^ Many more photos on this link ^^ for your perusal, R.Doyenne, et al. :)

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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