Lazy Truckers?

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Mr. T's Comment
member avatar

I'm starting to realize that the more I'm at the terminal or truck stops I hear some drivers complain about how they are not miles & this company sucks, that company sucks but then I later head them say "oh they gave me a load out west, I don't run out west" or "this load is only a few miles I'm not doing it". This leads me to believe all these guys who bash companies or complain about miles probably are either lazy or just too dang picky. You can't complain about miles then you get a 800 mile load to Oregon & then say I'm not taking a load out west because I don't like the mountains....crazy. This is why I separate myself from the crowds at the terminal or truck stops. I have no problem getting miles & I accept ALL loads. Just a thought I had on my mind. What do you guys think?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Mt T you're right on. I wrote about that exact thing in my book and we've talked about that on here many times. If you give the complainers and cry babies enough time to talk they'll eventually describe to you how they're the ones causing their own problems, not the company.

In fact, I was just saying yesterday that you can tell a top tier driver by the way they communicate. You don't hear all of the company bashing and the crying and complaining about regular everyday things. You don't hear about them changing companies every three months or how they can't get any miles. You don't see them pointing fingers at everyone around them for causing all of their problems.

Top tier drivers face all of the same difficulties and hardships as everyone else but they do their best to take it all in stride, keep a great attitude, and focus on getting the job done. They also understand that they will be rewarded for the favors they do for dispatch and the patience they show when things don't go smoothly in the offices. Maybe they need someone to take some unwanted short runs or bring a damaged trailer in for service. Maybe they double booked a load and sent the driver on a wild goose chase for a load that doesn't exist. You know what? That's trucking. A top tier driver knows this, takes it in stride, and realizes that dispatch will make it up to them - and they always do.

The entire reason I named this site TruckingTruth is because there is so much misinformation out there about this industry and specifically about a lot of the major companies. 98% of it is pure garbage that should have never seen the light of day but there is no shortage of websites let people spread this filth like it's solid gold career advice. I just couldn't sit back and let people be mislead by the poor performers out there who don't have what it takes to thrive in this industry. I wanted to teach people what it takes to be happy and successful in trucking and thankfully over the years a bunch of great drivers have joined the cause and have been coming here to give great advice every chance they get.

The key to getting great miles, getting home on time, and getting special favors from time to time is to pay it forward to dispatch. Take the tough runs that no one wants and you'll be rewarded with the great runs that very few people get. Get the job done safely and on time, every time. Be a top performer, keep a great attitude, and do your part to keep the company running smoothly. There is always plenty of freight and good runs for the top tier drivers at any major company but you have to earn those miles and gravy runs by doing the dirty work sometimes. Once you've proven yourself to be a top tier driver you'll be treated that way.

That's the error that so many people make. They know that drivers are in high demand so they think they can stroll into any company and just start bossing people around and cherry picking the good runs. The truth of the matter is that top tier drivers are in huge demand, not just any lousy driver. These companies will take just any driver because there are always some scraps lying around to feed them. But only the top performers get those special favors and consistently high miles that seem to elude most drivers.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

firemedic2816's Comment
member avatar

Agreed. Had a buddy of mine dispatched on a load that was going 80 miles down the road. Well being the arrogant A HOLE He told dispatch to have regional driver do it. There was another driver that took that trip. When she marked empty avail after the 80 mile run she had to dead head 10 miles down the road and got a run going from Georgia to California....That other guy would have had that run but he didn't want to do the little 80 mile run. Don't refuse runs EVERY Mile counts. Sometimes your dispatcher may need to you to do a little sprint to set you up for a marathon run...SMH Some people's children

I'm starting to realize that the more I'm at the terminal or truck stops I hear some drivers complain about how they are not miles & this company sucks, that company sucks but then I later head them say "oh they gave me a load out west, I don't run out west" or "this load is only a few miles I'm not doing it". This leads me to believe all these guys who bash companies or complain about miles probably are either lazy or just too dang picky. You can't complain about miles then you get a 800 mile load to Oregon & then say I'm not taking a load out west because I don't like the mountains....crazy. This is why I separate myself from the crowds at the terminal or truck stops. I have no problem getting miles & I accept ALL loads. Just a thought I had on my mind. What do you guys think?

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Chris K.'s Comment
member avatar

Typical of today's society. I gave a driver in here some smaller companies in my area that would hire him w the experience he had(very little) and he scoffed at it. He trained w Stevens and left for unknown reasons. He was worried about his opportunities and I let him know smaller companies in the area that would take a look at him. He said "no" they are reefer companies and I will only do dry Van. Ok good luck. Don't even get me started on people in the restaurant business.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Mario V.'s Comment
member avatar

I read exactly what you talking about in a how to be a trucker book not long ago lol, i guess things havent changed much from 07

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mr T, you've heard that preached here in TT. Then you saw it in real life! It's sad when people get into this business and think they're all that, and are too good for little cr@p.

Yes, the truth is the best drivers take what they are offered. The little stuff is just "spacer" between the money making goodies.

I've worked for my current DM for 6 months. I've taken 50 mile runs, picked up "stranded" drivers and done other "don't waste my time" things. But Donna keeps me rolling with every revenue mile I can get.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

Mt T you're right on. I wrote about that exact thing in my book and we've talked about that on here many times. If you give the complainers and cry babies enough time to talk they'll eventually describe to you how they're the ones causing their own problems, not the company.

In fact, I was just saying yesterday that you can tell a top tier driver by the way they communicate. You don't hear all of the company bashing and the crying and complaining about regular everyday things. You don't hear about them changing companies every three months or how they can't get any miles. You don't see them pointing fingers at everyone around them for causing all of their problems.

Top tier drivers face all of the same difficulties and hardships as everyone else but they do their best to take it all in stride, keep a great attitude, and focus on getting the job done. They also understand that they will be rewarded for the favors they do for dispatch and the patience they show when things don't go smoothly in the offices. Maybe they need someone to take some unwanted short runs or bring a damaged trailer in for service. Maybe they double booked a load and sent the driver on a wild goose chase for a load that doesn't exist. You know what? That's trucking. A top tier driver knows this, takes it in stride, and realizes that dispatch will make it up to them - and they always do.

The entire reason I named this site TruckingTruth is because there is so much misinformation out there about this industry and specifically about a lot of the major companies. 98% of it is pure garbage that should have never seen the light of day but there is no shortage of websites let people spread this filth like it's solid gold career advice. I just couldn't sit back and let people be mislead by the poor performers out there who don't have what it takes to thrive in this industry. I wanted to teach people what it takes to be happy and successful in trucking and thankfully over the years a bunch of great drivers have joined the cause and have been coming here to give great advice every chance they get.

The key to getting great miles, getting home on time, and getting special favors from time to time is to pay it forward to dispatch. Take the tough runs that no one wants and you'll be rewarded with the great runs that very few people get. Get the job done safely and on time, every time. Be a top performer, keep a great attitude, and do your part to keep the company running smoothly. There is always plenty of freight and good runs for the top tier drivers at any major company but you have to earn those miles and gravy runs by doing the dirty work sometimes. Once you've proven yourself to be a top tier driver you'll be treated that way.

That's the error that so many people make. They know that drivers are in high demand so they think they can stroll into any company and just start bossing people around and cherry picking the good runs. The truth of the matter is that top tier drivers are in huge demand, not just any lousy driver. These companies will take just any driver because there are always some scraps lying around to feed them. But only the top performers get those special favors and consistently high miles that seem to elude most drivers.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mr. T's Comment
member avatar

Mr T, you've heard that preached here in TT. Then you saw it in real life! It's sad when people get into this business and think they're all that, and are too good for little cr@p.

Yes, the truth is the best drivers take what they are offered. The little stuff is just "spacer" between the money making goodies.

I've worked for my current DM for 6 months. I've taken 50 mile runs, picked up "stranded" drivers and done other "don't waste my time" things. But Donna keeps me rolling with every revenue mile I can get.

Exactly! I now see exactly what you guys have been telling everyone

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Mr. T's Comment
member avatar

Mt T you're right on. I wrote about that exact thing in my book and we've talked about that on here many times. If you give the complainers and cry babies enough time to talk they'll eventually describe to you how they're the ones causing their own problems, not the company.

In fact, I was just saying yesterday that you can tell a top tier driver by the way they communicate. You don't hear all of the company bashing and the crying and complaining about regular everyday things. You don't hear about them changing companies every three months or how they can't get any miles. You don't see them pointing fingers at everyone around them for causing all of their problems.

Top tier drivers face all of the same difficulties and hardships as everyone else but they do their best to take it all in stride, keep a great attitude, and focus on getting the job done. They also understand that they will be rewarded for the favors they do for dispatch and the patience they show when things don't go smoothly in the offices. Maybe they need someone to take some unwanted short runs or bring a damaged trailer in for service. Maybe they double booked a load and sent the driver on a wild goose chase for a load that doesn't exist. You know what? That's trucking. A top tier driver knows this, takes it in stride, and realizes that dispatch will make it up to them - and they always do.

The entire reason I named this site TruckingTruth is because there is so much misinformation out there about this industry and specifically about a lot of the major companies. 98% of it is pure garbage that should have never seen the light of day but there is no shortage of websites let people spread this filth like it's solid gold career advice. I just couldn't sit back and let people be mislead by the poor performers out there who don't have what it takes to thrive in this industry. I wanted to teach people what it takes to be happy and successful in trucking and thankfully over the years a bunch of great drivers have joined the cause and have been coming here to give great advice every chance they get.

The key to getting great miles, getting home on time, and getting special favors from time to time is to pay it forward to dispatch. Take the tough runs that no one wants and you'll be rewarded with the great runs that very few people get. Get the job done safely and on time, every time. Be a top performer, keep a great attitude, and do your part to keep the company running smoothly. There is always plenty of freight and good runs for the top tier drivers at any major company but you have to earn those miles and gravy runs by doing the dirty work sometimes. Once you've proven yourself to be a top tier driver you'll be treated that way.

That's the error that so many people make. They know that drivers are in high demand so they think they can stroll into any company and just start bossing people around and cherry picking the good runs. The truth of the matter is that top tier drivers are in huge demand, not just any lousy driver. These companies will take just any driver because there are always some scraps lying around to feed them. But only the top performers get those special favors and consistently high miles that seem to elude most drivers.

Spot on Brett! I'm not gonna be one of those drivers hanging around trucks stops or the terminal complaining. Instead I'm gonna strive to be a top tier driver so that I can make top $

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mr. T's Comment
member avatar

Agreed. Had a buddy of mine dispatched on a load that was going 80 miles down the road. Well being the arrogant A HOLE He told dispatch to have regional driver do it. There was another driver that took that trip. When she marked empty avail after the 80 mile run she had to dead head 10 miles down the road and got a run going from Georgia to California....That other guy would have had that run but he didn't want to do the little 80 mile run. Don't refuse runs EVERY Mile counts. Sometimes your dispatcher may need to you to do a little sprint to set you up for a marathon run...SMH Some people's children

double-quotes-start.png

I'm starting to realize that the more I'm at the terminal or truck stops I hear some drivers complain about how they are not miles & this company sucks, that company sucks but then I later head them say "oh they gave me a load out west, I don't run out west" or "this load is only a few miles I'm not doing it". This leads me to believe all these guys who bash companies or complain about miles probably are either lazy or just too dang picky. You can't complain about miles then you get a 800 mile load to Oregon & then say I'm not taking a load out west because I don't like the mountains....crazy. This is why I separate myself from the crowds at the terminal or truck stops. I have no problem getting miles & I accept ALL loads. Just a thought I had on my mind. What do you guys think?

double-quotes-end.png

Exactly! I strive my best not to be "That Guy"

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
C T.'s Comment
member avatar

I've been given a few short runs myself since I've got solo. Although I can't refuse loads, I've never complained about anything since I've started. Got a nice run from Illinois to savannah ga this week. Decent miles and beautiful drive, except for that mess in Atlanta lol.

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