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Chelsea P.'s Comment
member avatar

I wasn't scared off. I was ignoring the thread because I didn't think I was getting what i needed. Turns out, I was getting what I needed. I have discovered that I can learn just about anything, including the things that take a certain kind of person in order to do it. I also discovered I don't have what it takes to follow through with this kind of commitment. This is too different and too separate from everything I know for me to continue. I never thought this life was grand or even that adventurous. I just didn't think it would be this hard. This life isn't for me and I'm getting out while I can. Thanks for helping me. Guess this site is good for just what you need it to be, getting the truth.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I do wish you success with your future endeavors. It's true that people decide to become drivers only to find out later that its not an easy job and much harder than it looks.

And yes it's true thay not everyone is suited to trucking.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Chelsea, there's no shame in getting out. If anybody understands that this crazy way of living is not for everyone, it's us nuts that choose this lifestyle. We try to teach people that it is way more than just a job, but it's all just words until you get out here and try it for yourself.

We wish you all the best, and will be glad to have you in here anytime you want.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

Chelsea...I don't think you should give up. I mean...your driving a freakin 18 wheeler...how many of your friends do that? I think of all the jobs I've had...none of them paid me to basically look out a windshield all day, none of them had a 3 foot commute..lol. I could never go back to a desk job. You've only been out for three months, it does get easier. I won't get into the whole leave Celadon or stay....but before you give up..take a look around to see what else is out there. Plenty of companies (mine included Roehl) offer weekly hometime...for your reset. Roehl even offers some tremendous extended programs...like 14 on....7 off.

Good luck with your decision, but I would encourage you to stay and fight!

Mark F. ( DAYBREAKER )'s Comment
member avatar

Wow!!!! From the prospective of someone trying to get their CDL and be a trucker. First of all, the process of earning that license is not easy. It is a lot of work and dedication just to get the license. Than you have to find a company that will take a chance on you. Again a lot of time and energy invested. And trust me I am finding out quickly. Even at 55 yrs old its not easy to hear NO from someone and keep that motivation that you had at the beginning. But one thing I do know from life's experience is this. A QUITTER IS A QUITTER. Once you have the choice to quit or figure the hard stuff out to make life easier and you choose to quit because it's easier, you will always quit. Every time something gets to tough you will quit. If you stick this out and figure it out and fight the good fight and come out the other side smiling and looking back and yelling YEAH BABY I DID THAT! You will never quit again unless it's the absolute last resort. Keep in mind I'm not a driver YET, but I have kids, grandkids, and have been through a lot in my life and quitting has always been an option but I never take that road unless I have a better plan in place. But always think everything through and once you have made that decision own it and never regret. Which ever way you go DRIVER, own it and best of luck to you. Mark F.

Chelsea...I don't think you should give up. I mean...your driving a freakin 18 wheeler...how many of your friends do that? I think of all the jobs I've had...none of them paid me to basically look out a windshield all day, none of them had a 3 foot commute..lol. I could never go back to a desk job. You've only been out for three months, it does get easier. I won't get into the whole leave Celadon or stay....but before you give up..take a look around to see what else is out there. Plenty of companies (mine included Roehl) offer weekly hometime...for your reset. Roehl even offers some tremendous extended programs...like 14 on....7 off.

Good luck with your decision, but I would encourage you to stay and fight!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Many things in life are hard but when you want them you can endure.I never got the impression from the posts that you wanted trucking. I do hope you find something you really want and push on to get it done.

Good luck on your journey. Not every job is for everyone. I could never go back to an office. My bro could never come on the road.

Really contemplate what you want in life aND make it happen

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Mark F wrote to Chelsea:

Wow!!!! From the prospective of someone trying to get their CDL and be a trucker. First of all, the process of earning that license is not easy. It is a lot of work and dedication just to get the license. Than you have to find a company that will take a chance on you. Again a lot of time and energy invested. And trust me I am finding out quickly. Even at 55 yrs old its not easy to hear NO from someone and keep that motivation that you had at the beginning. But one thing I do know from life's experience is this. A QUITTER IS A QUITTER. Once you have the choice to quit or figure the hard stuff out to make life easier and you choose to quit because it's easier, you will always quit. Every time something gets to tough you will quit. If you stick this out and figure it out and fight the good fight and come out the other side smiling and looking back and yelling YEAH BABY I DID THAT! You will never quit again unless it's the absolute last resort. Keep in mind I'm not a driver YET, but I have kids, grandkids, and have been through a lot in my life and quitting has always been an option but I never take that road unless I have a better plan in place. But always think everything through and once you have made that decision own it and never regret. Which ever way you go DRIVER, own it and best of luck to you. Mark F.

Mark I think your heart is in the right place, but perhaps for Chelsea quitting, is her only option because it's very obvious her heart and soul is not in this at all. Under normal circumstances I would agree with your point about quitting. This is different, and until a person experiences it first hand, it's virtually impossible to truly understand it or rationalize it. Unless you are highly motivated to really want to be a professional trucker, willing to sacrifice many aspects of your current lifestyle, take on a huge responsibility, it's best to walk away when you realize you are over your head. This is not the kind of job where you can fit a "square peg" in a "round hole", at least not for long. It's just not like that. Way too many variables and potential risks to overcome if a person is not committed to seeing it through, laser focused, thick skinned, and extremely patient.

Read all of the responses that were written especially from Old School, Brett, Sue, and Rainy...these folks know the ropes, offer great insight and advice to our friend Chelsea. I too believe she is doing the right thing by walking away and extend well wishes to her. This is not her calling.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mark F. ( DAYBREAKER )'s Comment
member avatar

I absolutely understand what your saying. What I don't understand is after all the work it took to get where she is to just walk away after such a short time. I am in no way trying to give advise on something I know so little about. I apologize if I came off that way. I just don't understand how someone can just quit after all it took to get there. That's what makes us all who we are I guess. Mark

Mark F wrote to Chelsea:

double-quotes-start.png

Wow!!!! From the prospective of someone trying to get their CDL and be a trucker. First of all, the process of earning that license is not easy. It is a lot of work and dedication just to get the license. Than you have to find a company that will take a chance on you. Again a lot of time and energy invested. And trust me I am finding out quickly. Even at 55 yrs old its not easy to hear NO from someone and keep that motivation that you had at the beginning. But one thing I do know from life's experience is this. A QUITTER IS A QUITTER. Once you have the choice to quit or figure the hard stuff out to make life easier and you choose to quit because it's easier, you will always quit. Every time something gets to tough you will quit. If you stick this out and figure it out and fight the good fight and come out the other side smiling and looking back and yelling YEAH BABY I DID THAT! You will never quit again unless it's the absolute last resort. Keep in mind I'm not a driver YET, but I have kids, grandkids, and have been through a lot in my life and quitting has always been an option but I never take that road unless I have a better plan in place. But always think everything through and once you have made that decision own it and never regret. Which ever way you go DRIVER, own it and best of luck to you. Mark F.

double-quotes-end.png

Mark I think your heart is in the right place, but perhaps for Chelsea quitting, is her only option because it's very obvious her heart and soul is not in this at all. Under normal circumstances I would agree with your point about quitting. This is different, and until a person experiences it first hand, it's virtually impossible to truly understand it or rationalize it. Unless you are highly motivated to really want to be a professional trucker, willing to sacrifice many aspects of your current lifestyle, take on a huge responsibility, it's best to walk away when you realize you are over your head. This is not the kind of job where you can fit a "square peg" in a "round hole", at least not for long. It's just not like that. Way too many variables and potential risks to overcome if a person is not committed to seeing it through, laser focused, thick skinned, and extremely patient.

Read all of the responses that were written especially from Old School, Brett, Sue, and Rainy...these folks know the ropes, offer great insight and advice to our friend Chelsea. I too believe she is doing the right thing by walking away and extend well wishes to her. This is not her calling.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

I completely understand that thought, Mark, however many don't have an inkling of what trucking really is.. until it smacks them upside the head. For instance my 30 year old daughter talked to me about going to a company sponsored cdl school. I didn't flat out tell het it would be a terrible choice for her at this time but i know it would be. Love het to pieces but she is the quitter kind and i don't think she has what it takes.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I absolutely understand what your saying. What I don't understand is after all the work it took to get where she is to just walk away after such a short time. I am in no way trying to give advise on something I know so little about. I apologize if I came off that way. I just don't understand how someone can just quit after all it took to get there. That's what makes us all who we are I guess. Mark

double-quotes-start.png

Mark F wrote to Chelsea:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Wow!!!! From the prospective of someone trying to get their CDL and be a trucker. First of all, the process of earning that license is not easy. It is a lot of work and dedication just to get the license. Than you have to find a company that will take a chance on you. Again a lot of time and energy invested. And trust me I am finding out quickly. Even at 55 yrs old its not easy to hear NO from someone and keep that motivation that you had at the beginning. But one thing I do know from life's experience is this. A QUITTER IS A QUITTER. Once you have the choice to quit or figure the hard stuff out to make life easier and you choose to quit because it's easier, you will always quit. Every time something gets to tough you will quit. If you stick this out and figure it out and fight the good fight and come out the other side smiling and looking back and yelling YEAH BABY I DID THAT! You will never quit again unless it's the absolute last resort. Keep in mind I'm not a driver YET, but I have kids, grandkids, and have been through a lot in my life and quitting has always been an option but I never take that road unless I have a better plan in place. But always think everything through and once you have made that decision own it and never regret. Which ever way you go DRIVER, own it and best of luck to you. Mark F.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Mark I think your heart is in the right place, but perhaps for Chelsea quitting, is her only option because it's very obvious her heart and soul is not in this at all. Under normal circumstances I would agree with your point about quitting. This is different, and until a person experiences it first hand, it's virtually impossible to truly understand it or rationalize it. Unless you are highly motivated to really want to be a professional trucker, willing to sacrifice many aspects of your current lifestyle, take on a huge responsibility, it's best to walk away when you realize you are over your head. This is not the kind of job where you can fit a "square peg" in a "round hole", at least not for long. It's just not like that. Way too many variables and potential risks to overcome if a person is not committed to seeing it through, laser focused, thick skinned, and extremely patient.

Read all of the responses that were written especially from Old School, Brett, Sue, and Rainy...these folks know the ropes, offer great insight and advice to our friend Chelsea. I too believe she is doing the right thing by walking away and extend well wishes to her. This is not her calling.

double-quotes-end.png

I agree 100% with G-town. Also, in her defense, it's not a total loss. She did still acquire her cdl and may eventually find something else besides otr to use it for. She could opt later on to try driving a dump truck locally or get her passenger endorsement and drive a bus. She still has options, but otr requires huge sacrifices and can be deadly if you are not prepared/don't have the right mindset for it.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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