Best States To Be A Truck Driver

Topic 16182 | Page 1

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:
Brad S.'s Comment
member avatar

Are there better states than others to be a truck driver in terms of getting good miles? I saw a video on youtube recently with a truck driver talking about living near good running lanes being important so you can get good miles right away instead of taking several days to work into the company's good running areas when first heading out and then conversely losing out on good miles if you have to be taken out of good running lanes to get back home. I was wondering if you had the flexibility to move anywhere, what location would you want to live in and be a trucker, in terms of having the best chance to get good miles? or does it matter?

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

double-quotes-start.png

My plan is to drive for a couple years and figure out which state i want to live in. Maybe northern California, Oregon , or West Virginia the part thats close to w maryland as the rolling hills are beautiful.

double-quotes-end.png

Also consider that certain states do not have state income tax. I wouldn't say that should be a deciding factor by any means, but it's a little more money you get to keep just for living in certain states.

Not so sure about that.

Example - you don't want to have a NYC address (that you are rarely ever occupying). Between Fed, State and NYC taxes - you could be forking over close to 50% of your income in taxes. California also has a very high tax rate - the reason a lot of business and individuals are leaving (as well as a cost of living almost as high as NYC).

A number of other states (NC for example) also have an annual "personal property tax".

While I believe in supporting where I live (patronizing local businesses whenever possible) - the notion of forking over a lot of hard earned $$, for services I don't receive (by being OTR 48 weeks out of the year) is loathsome.

Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming - do not have personal income taxes.

As far as "better states to get good miles" - as long as you're willing to run OTR and aren't looking for a regional (home every week) type of gig - than one state is as good as another pretty much. You have to consider, if you're going home once a month (or so) - then getting your home time is the only time you would have to consider where you reside.

Companies won't hire where they DON'T RUN (like Mario & myself here in S. Florida - with very few companies hiring), because they don't want the hassle & expense of deadheading you in and out for home time.

The plan of "driving for a couple of years" and looking for a place to put down roots is a pretty good one. Assuming you don't have roots now. But for right NOW - companies consider the address your drivers license currently lists, as your domicile location.

Rick

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

It really depends on the company and where their most important customers are located. I can't imagine Southern Florida would be good, regardless of the company. My company for example, operates primarily in the midwest where freight rates tend to be higher but we also have many customers in the Atlanta area and parts of the northeast so we run there also. Since I live close to Louisville I65, I64, and I71, there are always plenty of options to get me home or back out when I'm ready to roll again.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

It really depends on the company and where their most important customers are located. I can't imagine Southern Florida would be good, regardless of the company. My company for example, operates primarily in the midwest where freight rates tend to be higher but we also have many customers in the Atlanta area and parts of the northeast so we run there also. Since I live close to Louisville I65, I64, and I71, there are always plenty of options to get me home or back out when I'm ready to roll again.

double-quotes-end.png

F*** me right, lol

rofl-3.gif

Yeah, unfortunately you're in a tough spot down there when it comes to OTR trucking but there's work to be found. Just not quite as many opportunities as you'll find elsewhere.

The far Northeast like CT, NH, VT, and ME, Florida, some of the upper Midwest like the Dakotas and the upper Mountain region like Wyoming and Montana can be rough places to find work at times. But it does depend on the company and the type of freight also. The most opportunities are found throughout the Midwest. But you can find opportunities anywhere.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Mr M's Comment
member avatar

My plan is to drive for a couple years and figure out which state i want to live in. Maybe northern California, Oregon , or West Virginia the part thats close to w maryland as the rolling hills are beautiful.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

My plan is to drive for a couple years and figure out which state i want to live in. Maybe northern California, Oregon , or West Virginia the part thats close to w maryland as the rolling hills are beautiful.

Also consider that certain states do not have state income tax. I wouldn't say that should be a deciding factor by any means, but it's a little more money you get to keep just for living in certain states.

Rick S.'s Comment
member avatar
Best Answer!

double-quotes-start.png

My plan is to drive for a couple years and figure out which state i want to live in. Maybe northern California, Oregon , or West Virginia the part thats close to w maryland as the rolling hills are beautiful.

double-quotes-end.png

Also consider that certain states do not have state income tax. I wouldn't say that should be a deciding factor by any means, but it's a little more money you get to keep just for living in certain states.

Not so sure about that.

Example - you don't want to have a NYC address (that you are rarely ever occupying). Between Fed, State and NYC taxes - you could be forking over close to 50% of your income in taxes. California also has a very high tax rate - the reason a lot of business and individuals are leaving (as well as a cost of living almost as high as NYC).

A number of other states (NC for example) also have an annual "personal property tax".

While I believe in supporting where I live (patronizing local businesses whenever possible) - the notion of forking over a lot of hard earned $$, for services I don't receive (by being OTR 48 weeks out of the year) is loathsome.

Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington and Wyoming - do not have personal income taxes.

As far as "better states to get good miles" - as long as you're willing to run OTR and aren't looking for a regional (home every week) type of gig - than one state is as good as another pretty much. You have to consider, if you're going home once a month (or so) - then getting your home time is the only time you would have to consider where you reside.

Companies won't hire where they DON'T RUN (like Mario & myself here in S. Florida - with very few companies hiring), because they don't want the hassle & expense of deadheading you in and out for home time.

The plan of "driving for a couple of years" and looking for a place to put down roots is a pretty good one. Assuming you don't have roots now. But for right NOW - companies consider the address your drivers license currently lists, as your domicile location.

Rick

Deadhead:

To drive with an empty trailer. After delivering your load you will deadhead to a shipper to pick up your next load.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Bryn J.'s Comment
member avatar

I would also add Tennessee to the no personal income tax.

Nice thing about TN, we have three sections, West, Middle, East, which means delta, rolling hills, and mountains. Also within 10 hours drive of Nashville is a lot of country and people, plus the Waffle House.

smile.gif

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Don't live there anymore, but grew up in Nashville. It's a hub for trucking as a lot of freight lanes cross. It's also a mess during rush hour lol but I'd imagine you would get good miles there.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
plus the Waffle House.

Haha! Yes, you definitely want to choose a state to live in that has a Waffle house nearby your domicile.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

plus the Waffle House.

double-quotes-end.png

Haha! Yes, you definitely want to choose a state to live in that has a Waffle house nearby your domicile.

When i moved to Florida from Minnesota, i had to see what what is so great about waffle house. Maybe it was just the location i went to but I was not impressed at all.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Page 1 of 4 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

This topic has the following tags:

Becoming A Truck Driver Choosing A Trucking Company Trucking Industry Concerns
Click on any of the buttons above to view topics with that tag, or you can view a list of all forum tags here.

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More