How To Survive Phases Of CR Englands Training?

Topic 18136 | Page 1

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Tony's Comment
member avatar

Hey everybody, so I recently had the long dreaded conversation with my wife about me signing on with CR England inorder to obtain my CDL , (I knew she wouldn't be particularly happy with me going OTR) but she is being more supportive than anticipated. But I'm nervous, I read that during the two phases of training (when you are in a truck with a trainer) you receive 500-580 a week, bringing you to approx 2,000 - 2480 a month. That is a less than what I currently bring in and even then we are usually pay check to pay check. I am currently working as much overtime as possible saving up to float us but still I fear it may not be enough. And being on the road means no home cooked meals, I grew up in a rig with my dad and I know how expencive eating at truck stops can be. I was thinking about packing my own food (I understand I may be gone up to 3 weeks at a time), mabey the bare minimum like homemade granola bars vacuum sealed and multivitamins, rationed out it should all fit in my duffel bag along with my clothes and personal items (I travel light). Any thoughts? Is this a good idea? Thank you and God bless.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Isaac H.'s Comment
member avatar

If i were you i would try and have a few months of savings to live off of before you go then.

I didn't have much money left over after food, laundry, misc... Etc.

Living off of granola bars and vitamins sounds pretty terrible and your really going to want to be in good health because driving for 10 hours a day will be pretty rough.

C T.'s Comment
member avatar

Have you looked into other companies or is CRE your only option? Training and the beginning is the hardest transition to becoming a driver out here. It's mentally, physically, and financially draining. However,almost every driver you see out on the road has had a similar experience, and there are millions of us. It'll be tough but you can do it.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I agree with Isaac....you'll want enough money saved up to be able to pay your bills and to feed yourself while you're in the early stages of training. The process of getting this career underway is already very stressful. Adding financial problems and improper diet to the mix and it's a recipe for a nervous breakdown, or a marriage breakdown.

People do show up to Paid CDL Training Programs with empty, or nearly empty pockets, and they get through it. So it's not a life or death kind of situation, but it certainly makes an extremely challenging time that much more difficult.

If you have to sell something or borrow a little from family to pad your funds a little, I would consider doing so.

We also have some great recommendations for eating healthy and cheap on the road:

How can I eat healthy on the road? Will I be able to cook my own meals?

FAQ: Trucker Health - Eating, Sleeping, & Exercise

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I also agree with Isaac. I hate to suggest this, because I think it's better to get more training, but there are companies that have shorter training periods (think, less time sharing a truck with your trainer). I don't know if CR England does this or not, but I know many companies help their trainees out by offering interest-free cash advances during training. I know Prime and Swift do this--you might want to find out if CR England does it too. Obviously that's not the best strategy simply because you have to pay the money back, but they deduct a little bit from your paycheck each week, so you hardly notice the difference. Finally, I believe it's Roehl that actually hires you on and pays you during CDL school. That extra month of income can make a big difference. You might want to look at them and see if they hire in your area.

Not trying to pry you away from CR England. We pretty much always encourage people to stick with their first company for a year. Just trying to make you aware of some other options that might make that first year a little more doable.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Tony's Comment
member avatar

Thank you everybody for your replies it means alot. And I am in the process of selling my extra car and with my tax return conning in the next few weeks this should all help; Paul W. I have considered other companies but CR England is the closest, I live approximately 30 minutes from their Mira Loma terminal and their training center in Fontana. I like Cr England because they require no cash out if pocket being repaid check by check unlike Schneider. But if you can recommend any companies in the southern California area that offer the same program (no cash out of pocket with a contract) then I would consider them, especially if the pay is better.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Prime is a $200 per week advance while you have your permit...about two weeks...you pay back at $25/per week once you get the CDL.

Once you get the CDL you get $700 GROSS per week. Upfront I think I paid $155 for background check and permit. They will advance you $ for the TWIC card and sleep apnea if you need it.

You don't have to live near a terminal. We hire from CA and do have a drop yard in Fontana.

And prime is awesome. We have reefer flatbed and tanker.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

Tony's Comment
member avatar

Prime is a $200 per week advance while you have your permit...about two weeks...you pay back at $25/per week once you get the CDL.

Once you get the CDL you get $700 GROSS per week. Upfront I think I paid $155 for background check and permit. They will advance you $ for the TWIC card and sleep apnea if you need it.

You don't have to live near a terminal. We hire from CA and do have a drop yard in Fontana.

And prime is awesome. We have reefer flatbed and tanker.

O wow I didn't know prime even had a student training program (where have I been) do you by chance have a recruiting center phone number so I can learn more? I'm sorry I would try and search for it but I am about to leave for work.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Sleep Apnea:

A physical disorder in which you have pauses in your breathing, or take shallow breaths, during sleep. These pauses can last anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. Normal breathing will usually resume, sometimes with a loud choking sound or snort.

In obstructive sleep apnea, your airways become blocked or collapse during sleep, causing the pauses and shallow breathing.

It is a chronic condition that will require ongoing management. It affects about 18 million people in the U.S.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Tony, been following your thread; you really need to take the time to review this link:

Paid CDL Training Programs

I think it will help you see the bigger picture. Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

As G Town suggested, you. Need to determine things that are most important to you and compare companies. More CPM? Home time? Specific areas you want to run? Pet policy? There are many things that could influence your decision. In my area, only CRE swift and roehl advertised. I just happened to know someone who recommended prime and I love it.

I'm always willing to answer.any questions about prime and the other drivers here love their companies just as much. Find someplace you can stay a whole year. Learn to manage your time and you will be very happy most anywhere.

I send drivers to Angela Gomez Prime recruiting : 800 224 4585 ext 6474. She's really sweet and happy to help. She can be trusted to give you correct and up to date info. I hope you find what you are looking for. ;)

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

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