Is It Smart To Have A CO And Smoke Detector In Your Sleeper?

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Jonathan Bailey's Comment
member avatar

I don't know if this is standard equipment or if the driver has to supply his own.

There may be times when a truck has to be left running while the driver sleeps so climate controls can operate. Hopefully, there is working cold a/c in hot regions.

One of my concerns is the possibility of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning should diesel fumes leak into the sleeper somehow. I figure the sleepers need to be well ventilated. Of course, vehicle fires are also possible.

What do truckers use to wake them up in the morning while bedding down in a sleeper? A wind-up alarm clock? A clock radio if there is a place to plug it in?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

I don't know if this is standard equipment or if the driver has to supply his own.

There may be times when a truck has to be left running while the driver sleeps so climate controls can operate. Hopefully, there is working cold a/c in hot regions.

One of my concerns is the possibility of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning should diesel fumes leak into the sleeper somehow. I figure the sleepers need to be well ventilated. Of course, vehicle fires are also possible.

What do truckers use to wake them up in the morning while bedding down in a sleeper? A wind-up alarm clock? A clock radio if there is a place to plug it in?

I have an APU so no need to idle the truck for air or heat. I also have an inverter so.I could plug in a clock if I wanted but I just use my phone ;)

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Jonathan Bailey's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I don't know if this is standard equipment or if the driver has to supply his own.

There may be times when a truck has to be left running while the driver sleeps so climate controls can operate. Hopefully, there is working cold a/c in hot regions.

One of my concerns is the possibility of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning should diesel fumes leak into the sleeper somehow. I figure the sleepers need to be well ventilated. Of course, vehicle fires are also possible.

What do truckers use to wake them up in the morning while bedding down in a sleeper? A wind-up alarm clock? A clock radio if there is a place to plug it in?

double-quotes-end.png

I have an APU so no need to idle the truck for air or heat. I also have an inverter so.I could plug in a clock if I wanted but I just use my phone ;)

But smoke/CO detectors are not commonly installed by the company?

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Jonathan Bailey's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

I don't know if this is standard equipment or if the driver has to supply his own.

There may be times when a truck has to be left running while the driver sleeps so climate controls can operate. Hopefully, there is working cold a/c in hot regions.

One of my concerns is the possibility of CO (carbon monoxide) poisoning should diesel fumes leak into the sleeper somehow. I figure the sleepers need to be well ventilated. Of course, vehicle fires are also possible.

What do truckers use to wake them up in the morning while bedding down in a sleeper? A wind-up alarm clock? A clock radio if there is a place to plug it in?

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

I have an APU so no need to idle the truck for air or heat. I also have an inverter so.I could plug in a clock if I wanted but I just use my phone ;)

double-quotes-end.png

But smoke/CO detectors are not commonly installed by the company?

I have a phone too, but don't know if it is loud enough to wake a heavy sleeper as me. I may have to get an inverter to plug my Sony Dream Machine into. I was never aware until now that trucks did not have 115 VAC outlets. What do heavy commercial trucks use for electrical systems, 24 VDC as do military vehicles with multiple batteries, series or series/parallel connected?

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Kevin H.'s Comment
member avatar

I don't think CO2 or smoke detectors are common. Trucks commonly have 12V cigarette lighter outlets.

I use my phone to wake up. I guess I'm not a heavy sleeper, but my experience is that when I'm setting the alarm at night I wonder if it will be loud enough, then when it goes off in the morning I'm stared by how loud it is. You can always try it at home. Set your phone for 5 minutes before your regular alarm and see if it wakes you up.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

My phone is linked to the blue tooth in the truck so my alarm comes through the stereo and I'll use music as the alarm. Generally something heavy like Slipknot, Hatebreed or Slayer.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

It depends on the company what they have in their trucks. Some have nothing but 12 volt plugs like in your car. Some have inverters, which gives you some 110v outlets. Some have APUs. The APU is the only one that will give you power without idling the truck. Without an APU, companies may or may not allow you to add your own inverter. You can look on YouTube. Little Guy Show did a video a while back about inverters that may help. As far as CO detectors, you could get a batter operated one and set it in your truck. Since CO heavier than air, you could set the CO detector on the floor by the bunk.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

APUs:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Pianoman's Comment
member avatar

I kept a CO detector in my truck. Bought it for like $20 at Walmart if I remember right. I had a battery-powered alarm clock with me (the type with the bells on top) but typically just used my phone.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
member avatar

On the CO detectors, it's not a bad idea to have one. Even if you have an APU , depending on how far back it sits inn the frame and the direction of the exhaust, there's still a risk of the fumes coming into the cab ( ever so slight mind you but still there). If having one in your truck adds that extra sense of security, I'd suggest the aviation style detector they use on aircraft vs the one you can up at Wal-Mart. The reason being, the aviation style is designed for small compartments and will alert faster than the other style. They run about $130 but you can order them online.

APU:

Auxiliary Power Unit

On tractor trailers, and APU is a small diesel engine that powers a heat and air conditioning unit while charging the truck's main batteries at the same time. This allows the driver to remain comfortable in the cab and have access to electric power without running the main truck engine.

Having an APU helps save money in fuel costs and saves wear and tear on the main engine, though they tend to be expensive to install and maintain. Therefore only a very small percentage of the trucks on the road today come equipped with an APU.

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

They sell screaming meanie alarms in truck stops that will definitely wake you lol

I also have a cat so I guess he d die of CO before me sorta like a canary in the mines. (Yeah that was mean)

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