Bummed Out! Arghhh.

Topic 19464 | Page 1

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Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Well so far I have done a really good job according to my mentor and I am still feeling high on trucking! Absolutley love it. But today was the very first day that I was pulled over to the side of the road in South Dakota and was given a warning because somehow someway I missed a weigh station and passed it. Thankijg God though that I was and am still a student because it could have been worst. I wanted to have no mistakes, in my first year concerning way stations and such but nope.

I feel really down and out about that. I dont have any points or tickets on my record and my record is squeaky clean but I still really wish I did not get a warning. O well, I didn't get a ticket and I am going to move on and keep loving my career.

Sure can use some prayers right now and encouragement.

Bart's Comment
member avatar

Signs, signs everywhere a sign Blocking out the scenery breaking my mind Do this don't do that Can't you read the sign.....

Not sure how old you are but those are lyrics to an old song from the 70's

When I was a mentor that was my biggest pet peeve. You have to read EVERY SIGN ON THE ROADWAY. Bridge height Lane of travel Speed zones etc etc etc. Signs will help keep you and the "motoring public" safe. You were fortunate for the warning. Best of luck to you in finishing your TraiNing and going solo Watch them signs!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Turtle's Comment
member avatar

I did it once also, just after going solo. Sad thing is, 5 miles back my gps gave me a heads up of the weigh station ahead. But I didn't think of it again until I glanced over to my right and saw all the trucks lined up...."Hmm, what's going on...Oh ***t!

They never came after me, however. I got lucky, and haven't missed one since.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Hey, that's a great lesson that you learned the easy way. You'll be keeping a sharp lookout for all road signs from now on, and no damage was done. You're very lucky. Be thankful, and keep moving forward. All is well.

smile.gif

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Victor any mistake that doesn't result in an accident, a citation or loss in pay is the best lesson learned of all. Consider it a blessing!

I do agree with Bart. Force yourself to read every sign...until it becomes intuitive. Might take a while, but try to focus on it.

Victor C. II's Comment
member avatar

Ok I sure will force myself to read every sign everywhere. Like you all have said here I need to be thankful it was not any worst. Thanks for the advice I sure will use it from this point forward and not mess up like that again. Thanks again!☺

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Victor, when we first start doing this there are so many things to learn, and habits that we need to form in order to be successful at it. Observation is one of those critical characteristics that a truck driver must develop. Always knowing what's going on around us at all times, and constantly vigilant of our surroundings and what is happening in all six of the spaces around our vehicle is a learned habit. It can be exhausting at first when trying to keep up with all the things we see, and all the things that have an effect on how we should be driving or what we should be doing. These are learned characteristics of a professional driver. It takes practice and exposure to so many different scenarios to help us develop a keen sense of observation.

You got off easy, and it is a lesson learned. You know how it felt to get caught! Now you can move forward with a renewed understanding of how observant a professional driver needs to be at all times. As you get further into this career you will recognize the times when you are letting your guard down and being complacent, it is at those times that I pull over and take a little break so that I can get myself focused on what I am doing.

When we are training like you are, it is all so exciting, and yet also exhausting. It is easy to lose focus when faced with so many overwhelming circumstances, and so much information that needs to be retained.

You are going to get there - this was just a minor hiccup. Hang in there brother, and "keep on trucking."

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

The signs that will easily get you are the white ones. Most 4 wheelers can ignore them and get away with it. These state legal instructions, like "WEIGH STATION, ALL TRUCKS MUST EXIT"

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...or the other "white signs"; bridge weight restrictions. Read the fine print. Combination vehicles are many times specified with a different restriction than a straight CMV.

Combination Vehicle:

A vehicle with two separate parts - the power unit (tractor) and the trailer. Tractor-trailers are considered combination vehicles.

CMV:

Commercial Motor Vehicle

A CMV is a vehicle that is used as part of a business, is involved in interstate commerce, and may fit any of these descriptions:

  • Weighs 10,001 pounds or more
  • Has a gross vehicle weight rating or gross combination weight rating of 10,001 pounds or more
  • Is designed or used to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) not for compensation
  • Is designed or used to transport 9 or more passengers (including the driver) for compensation
  • Is transporting hazardous materials in a quantity requiring placards
Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar

The signs that will easily get you are the white ones. Most 4 wheelers can ignore them and get away with it. These state legal instructions, like "WEIGH STATION, ALL TRUCKS MUST EXIT"

I must be the only non-trucker who reads every single one of those signs...

Gotta study up! smile.gif

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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