Millis Transfer Info

Topic 19465 | Page 1

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Nicholas L.'s Comment
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I've only seen outdated info on here about Millis. Anyone have any updated info on them? Specifically availability of miles. I already know starting pay is very good. I'm inexperienced and a veteran just for extra info.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
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Millis is an excellent choice. They have some regional routes. Once you prove yourself the miles are there. They have nice equipment. They get you home when they say. You can look up "Trucker Who" on YouTube. He has videos of his training and travels with Millis. Good luck to you.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Nicholas L.'s Comment
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Millis is an excellent choice. They have some regional routes. Once you prove yourself the miles are there. They have nice equipment. They get you home when they say. You can look up "Trucker Who" on YouTube. He has videos of his training and travels with Millis. Good luck to you.

Thanks for the info. They seem to have a more consistent amount of miles around the year as opposed to Schneider bulk, who I was also looking at. Do you happen to know what the difference between per diem and non per diem pay is? Doesn't have to be specific to Millis, just general difference.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

Old School's Comment
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Hello Nicholas, thanks for your service to our Country, and welcome to the forum!

You say you are inexperienced, and you also asked this question...

Anyone have any updated info on them? Specifically availability of miles.

I just wanted to point out something to you about "availability of miles." All these companies make their money by moving freight. Therefore they want you moving as many miles as you can. A new driver always thinks about the fact that he has got to have a lot of miles to make money, and so he bases his search for a job on a company that can "give" him a lot of miles.

You have to start out with the understanding that miles are not given, but earned. For a truck driver miles mean money, and whenever we think about money we should always think about it in terms of being earned. For some reason there is a trend to think about miles in terms of them being given to us because the company has a lot of them to give, or maybe they only have a limited amount to give. We would never think about money like that - we would never expect the company to give us a lot of money just because they have a lot of it. We would expect that we would earn what they give us, or pay us.

I often try to help drivers focus on miles in a little different way. I work for Knight Transportation, and on any given day I could get on the internet and find drivers complaining that Knight does not have enough miles to keep them busy, and so they are going to bail and go to another company. I actually could find this kind of information on just about any company out there. I am on a specialized fleet at Knight, and we have drivers quit all the time who state their reason for quitting is that they can't get enough miles. It makes no sense, because I am doing all I can and averaging above 3,000 miles each week. If I can help you understand the concept of running all the miles you can, I will have helped you make a quantum leap in your ability to both enjoy and succeed at this career.

The way a driver gets consistently good miles has little or nothing to do with the company, and everything to do with the way he manages his time, and his communications with his dispatcher. A successful trucker is an opportunist, and he makes things happen out here in his favor. He makes little sacrifices that other drivers either do not understand how to do or just don't care enough to learn the little things that make for success. As a rookie driver you can't expect to be running with the big dogs, you just don't have the concepts down yet that make for success. At most of my delivery points I am always the first person there - I may have slept there through the night to accomplish that or maybe used some other strategy. The point of that is that I am going to get unloaded first before any of the other drivers, and not only that but I am not going to start my clock burning up my time while waiting on other folks to get unloaded. My dispatcher has come to know that I take care of things that way, and therefore I am the man that he goes to with difficult or lengthy loads. He knows me by what I have consistently proven to him, and he counts on me because of that pattern of success out here. If you want to run with the big dogs you have got to produce like the big dogs.

Don't expect to set the world on fire that first year out here. Start working on developing a good track record of "gittin er done" and you will be setting yourself up for success. The rewards in this business don't always come to the folks who can work hard, but more so to the folks who can outsmart the other players on the field. This is a competition out here, and when you get that concept locked down in your understanding you will begin to see the way to success at this.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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Well, he responded, but had a real smart*ss tone and said something about Millis having a mileage guarantee and us not answering his questions. I know they have a home time guarantee, but I'm not familiar with a mileage guarantee. Maybe he'll try again with a nicer approach, maybe not.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
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Well, he responded, but had a real smart*ss tone and said something about Millis having a mileage guarantee and us not answering his questions. I know they have a home time guarantee, but I'm not familiar with a mileage guarantee. Maybe he'll try again with a nicer approach, maybe not.

Hey Brett, I didn't see his response. However, on Millis' website they say you can make X dollars in your first year, if you drive the average fleet miles. Or something like that. As we know that is far from a guarantee. This site has helped me to see the truth in this industry. Thanks to you and the TT community, I am better prepared than most for this journey I'm on.

Taxman's Comment
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Do you happen to know what the difference between per diem and non per diem pay is? Doesn't have to be specific to Millis, just general difference.

There's been quite a bit of discussion in the past couple of weeks about per diem pay, and a lot more going back a few years.

In short, per diem pay is a pretax reimbursement of your on the road meals expense when you are traveling away from home and can't sleep in your own bed. What your employer does is reclassify part of your wages as per diem reimbursements, up to the federal standard rate of $63 a day. This reduces your gross wages on your W2, as well as your social security and medicare withholdings. It lowers your taxes, but it also lowers your social security benefit when you retire, and lowers your employer's 401k matching contributions because it reduces the wages that the match is calculated on. It also raises your debt to income ratio when you try to borrow money, because your W2 wages are lower. If you take per diem, you'll want it to be the full $63.

Per Diem:

Getting paid per diem means getting a portion of your salary paid to you without taxes taken out. It's technically classified as a meal and expense reimbursement.

Truck drivers and others who travel for a living get large tax deductions for meal expenses. The Government set up per diem pay as a way to reimburse some of the taxes you pay with each paycheck instead of making you wait until tax filing season.

Getting per diem pay means a driver will get a larger paycheck each week but a smaller tax return at tax time.

We have a ton of information on our wiki page on per diem pay

OldRookie's Comment
member avatar

Well, he responded, but had a real smart*ss tone and said something about Millis having a mileage guarantee and us not answering his questions. I know they have a home time guarantee, but I'm not familiar with a mileage guarantee. Maybe he'll try again with a nicer approach, maybe not.

I drive for Millis. There is no mileage guarantee. Like most everywhere... be safe, productive and cooperative with your dispatcher and, on average, you will get the miles you demonstrate that you are capable of running. I've been solo since August and I average 2,600 a week. Some weeks more, some weeks less... but, I'm sure I will end up with ~120,000 a year as long as I do my part to make Millis successful.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
LDRSHIP's Comment
member avatar

I am going to chime in with my 2 cents about miles. First off, if you are a safe productive driver, you will get miles. Just realize sometimes you bite the bullet with loads that leave you sitting. There is a lot to be said about taking those loads that kill your miles without complaint. My last 2 weeks miles were doo doo. 2 weeks ago I had a load to Sysco followed by a 3 part pickup. All of them had horrendous waiting times. I stil got it done. Last week a deer ruined my week. While I was at the yard, my DM and the load planners asked me to take a load. I was already preplanned to where I would finish out a 34 hr reset during the repairs before i had to pickup. This change of plans involved me leaving 4 hrs before my reset was up. I took the load. I did voice that my recaps were shot. The load planners needed this load done. The client needed it on time. They had the driver bring the load to me. I got it done. As a return favor, I got a load running by the house for my 34hr. This week, I am all booked up. My last load I literally Tcalled 30 mins from the receiver because they wouldn't take me early. Someone else wil finish that out. I had to run and grab my next load. The whole point of this is: sometimes it is all about a little quid pro quo. Scratch the load planners back and you will get yours scratched in return.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

I started here with Millis on March 1st, after finishing up orientation at the Eden schoolhouse. So far I've averaged 12,000 miles per month. There are no guarantees on mileage. If you have a willingness to drive safely and productively, you'll get the miles. With miles comes pay. Everything I was told in orientation is a fact. A lot more than I can say for the previous two companies I drove for.

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