Does Backing Scare And Frustrate You? Of Course! Here Are Some Stories To Help Calm The Nerves.

Topic 20192 | Page 4

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The satellite image goes with the above reply. The dock on the right is for grocery (left is general merchandise (GM), the grocery dock is where I needed to spot the trailer to be unloaded. There is a wall the extends past the top trailer about 20' additional feet, difficult to see in the image. Best to enter from the left. I should start putting some of these in Errol's backing practice thread. So yes, the first time I was dispatched here was my third day on the account, about 5 years ago. For context read my reply before this...

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Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Backing nervousness was just mentioned on another thread so i figured i would.bump this for those soon going to school

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Bump

Dave S (formerly known as's Comment
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My first solo load was to a grocery distributor in Layton UT. Boy howdy it looked tight going in. As an added element, had to slide the tandems back before guard shack would let me it. It's one of those places where it had a concrete retaining wall in front of the dock area and once docked you uncoupled then headed to a bobtail area. Took some wiggling to get'r in but did it! Woot right? Nope... silly me for got to open the doors. So pulled out and open the doors. While following my same tracks back in, I thought to myself, dang this is going to be easy. Why couldn't it been this easy the first time? Setup is the answer.

After a lot of backing into tight spots and and wide open spaces I still ain't very good at setup. Wide open lots are my arch enemy. Think the loves in Hardin MT in the early afternoon or Pilot/Flying J in Butte MT. 100 spots open and it'll take me 20 minutes to back in. rofl-2.gif

Give me a Henze plant in Holland Michigan any day and I'll be in the spot in minutes.

shocked.png

Bobtail:

"Bobtailing" means you are driving a tractor without a trailer attached.

Tandems:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

Tandem:

Tandem Axles

A set of axles spaced close together, legally defined as more than 40 and less than 96 inches apart by the USDOT. Drivers tend to refer to the tandem axles on their trailer as just "tandems". You might hear a driver say, "I'm 400 pounds overweight on my tandems", referring to his trailer tandems, not his tractor tandems. Tractor tandems are generally just referred to as "drives" which is short for "drive axles".

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy-

Thanks for bumping this to the top. It will be interesting to see if I have forgotten anything in all these years.

Deb S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for starting this thread. I often worry about going to new customers especially after reading it’s going to be tight. I’m new to trucking. Got my CDL in January and have had my truck for a month. My backing skills need a lot of work.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for starting this thread. I often worry about going to new customers especially after reading it’s going to be tight. I’m new to trucking. Got my CDL in January and have had my truck for a month. My backing skills need a lot of work.

Backing will take several months to get a handle on, so the more practice you get, the better you should become. If you have the time and space, practice at truck stops, shippers/receivers, or at a terminal.

The main thing is take your time, don't forget your surroundings, use as many GOALs as necessary, and don't hit anything.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Back when I had customers to go to, I would tell who ever I spoke with there that I was new and it might take me awhile. They all where very understanding and told me to take my time

Deb S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the tips. I do tell people I’m new but I still get stressed. I need to figure out a way to manage this anxiety because I don’t want to quit.

Pete E Pothole's Comment
member avatar

The day you stop worrying about hitting stuff is the day you will hit something. It's ok to be nervous, downright scared even, but take as long as it needs and get out as many times as you need to. Cant say I was ever too careful while performing a backing maneuver. One day you will have a moment of clarity that will ease much of the fear and nervousness. From then on please remember to guard against complacency.

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