Take Your Time

Topic 21395 | Page 1

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Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

Those three words never meant much to me when I started driving, but quickly over time I understand why i was always told that. Every time i got in a rush it lead to near missed and 2 backing accidents.

Why I thought of this was because this morning in Connecticut my truck wouldn't start, ended up needing a new set of batteries. This caused me to be late to this morning's final. So instead of being rushed I made the decision to take my time since I was late anyways. Already did my part and alerted the company, so no need to worry.

After all that I still feel relaxed and not all strung out. Things happen outside of our control, no need to get all stressed about it.

Now I will wait, hopefully I am able to get my next pickup and get out of the northeast. Once the planners saw that I will go to the northeast it's all I been getting lately, but it's an awesome experience. Connecticut is a pretty state.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Those three words never meant much to me when I started driving, but quickly over time I understand why i was always told that. Every time i got in a rush it lead to near missed and 2 backing accidents.

Why I thought of this was because this morning in Connecticut my truck wouldn't start, ended up needing a new set of batteries. This caused me to be late to this morning's final. So instead of being rushed I made the decision to take my time since I was late anyways. Already did my part and alerted the company, so no need to worry.

After all that I still feel relaxed and not all strung out. Things happen outside of our control, no need to get all stressed about it.

Now I will wait, hopefully I am able to get my next pickup and get out of the northeast. Once the planners saw that I will go to the northeast it's all I been getting lately, but it's an awesome experience. Connecticut is a pretty state.

sooooo true! i used to feel badly about shutting down due to weather then would feel pressured to rush and get it in. Experience teaches you that appointments will get changed. I'm not a "drive through it and get it done" type anymore. But i think i still probably drive through more than some others would, but i dont feel the guilt of being a crappy driver who didnt do their job. on the contrary, i keep myself and the public from unsafe unconditions. of course, i have had time to see many many accidents, and three times was almost hit by other semis driving irratically in bad weather. all that changes your perspective om things.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Those three words never meant much to me when I started driving, but quickly over time I understand why i was always told that. Every time i got in a rush it lead to near missed and 2 backing accidents.

Why I thought of this was because this morning in Connecticut my truck wouldn't start, ended up needing a new set of batteries. This caused me to be late to this morning's final. So instead of being rushed I made the decision to take my time since I was late anyways. Already did my part and alerted the company, so no need to worry.

After all that I still feel relaxed and not all strung out. Things happen outside of our control, no need to get all stressed about it.

Now I will wait, hopefully I am able to get my next pickup and get out of the northeast. Once the planners saw that I will go to the northeast it's all I been getting lately, but it's an awesome experience. Connecticut is a pretty state.

double-quotes-end.png

sooooo true! i used to feel badly about shutting down due to weather then would feel pressured to rush and get it in. Experience teaches you that appointments will get changed. I'm not a "drive through it and get it done" type anymore. But i think i still probably drive through more than some others would, but i dont feel the guilt of being a crappy driver who didnt do their job. on the contrary, i keep myself and the public from unsafe unconditions. of course, i have had time to see many many accidents, and three times was almost hit by other semis driving irratically in bad weather. all that changes your perspective om things.

I am the same to, if I got to white knuckle it then I'll just wait it out. I think when we first start we think dispatch is disappointed in us, when in reality they just read the message and reply saying ok stay safe. After that they go on to other matters, they are too busy to stress over one driver, when they have many to take care of. People hate technology but the fact that we have a paper trail instead of phone conversation is an awesome thing. Covers everyone's butt.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Whats crazier is that every time I shut down for wind or winter weather, we got QC messages after about some of our trucks having accidents or blow overs. All that does is reinforce my decision was correct.

i was in MO last year and the wind was insane. There were no weather alerts, it just came out of nowhete. The sky turned yellow and after driving at 45mph with my hazards on, I stopped. By the end of my break, tornadoes were being reported, power lines down...and trash cans and parts of the Flying J sign were hitting the parked trucks. ...and FOUR of our trucks in 3 states were blown over.

Stay calm, go slow, park it when needed. Cant be said enough.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

You guys make excellent points.

If you want to drive a ton of miles safely you want to conserve your energy and remain focused. One big way of doing that is to make sure you don't get all worked up over things. Being in a hurry or getting frustrated when things don't go your way is distracting and exhausting. Keep your cool and keep a level head.

Also, if you're impatient and frustrated on a regular basis you're not enjoying the job and you're going to burn out before too long.

We all know that slow and steady wins the race. Stay safe, keep that truck rolling strong and steady when you have the opportunity, and try to enjoy yourself along the way. You'll get a lot more work done, you'll enjoy yourself a lot more, and you'll stay in the game for the long term.

I've always noticed that experienced drivers tend to be either really laid back and relaxed or they're a bundle of nerves all strung out and aggravated all the time. Learn to control your emotions and keep yourself on an even keel. Focus on the long term. Don't freak out when things don't go your way. Don't have a nervous breakdown because you're not maximizing your miles every day.

A small glitch in your day can become a gigantic catastrophe if you let things snowball. I've seen people have one or two little things go wrong, they get frustrated, they lose focus, and then make a huge mistake because of it. Don't let that happen to you.

smile.gif

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

I use the mantra

I Don't Care

Not to mean I don't give a rats's hiney, but to remind myself that whatever it is isn't all that important in my day's work. Whether it's following 2mph slower for a bit, another truck trying to squeeze past on the right (disappearing) lane or 30 minutes wait at a dock, or even an extra day waiting for business. (I know my DM hasn't forgotten me or the other three drivers cooling heels at truck stops.)

No stress living is better for the heart and soul.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

You guys make excellent points.

If you want to drive a ton of miles safely you want to conserve your energy and remain focused. One big way of doing that is to make sure you don't get all worked up over things. Being in a hurry or getting frustrated when things don't go your way is distracting and exhausting. Keep your cool and keep a level head.

Also, if you're impatient and frustrated on a regular basis you're not enjoying the job and you're going to burn out before too long.

We all know that slow and steady wins the race. Stay safe, keep that truck rolling strong and steady when you have the opportunity, and try to enjoy yourself along the way. You'll get a lot more work done, you'll enjoy yourself a lot more, and you'll stay in the game for the long term.

I've always noticed that experienced drivers tend to be either really laid back and relaxed or they're a bundle of nerves all strung out and aggravated all the time. Learn to control your emotions and keep yourself on an even keel. Focus on the long term. Don't freak out when things don't go your way. Don't have a nervous breakdown because you're not maximizing your miles every day.

A small glitch in your day can become a gigantic catastrophe if you let things snowball. I've seen people have one or two little things go wrong, they get frustrated, they lose focus, and then make a huge mistake because of it. Don't let that happen to you.

smile.gif

I use the mantra

double-quotes-start.png

I Don't Care

double-quotes-end.png

Not to mean I don't give a rats's hiney, but to remind myself that whatever it is isn't all that important in my day's work. Whether it's following 2mph slower for a bit, another truck trying to squeeze past on the right (disappearing) lane or 30 minutes wait at a dock, or even an extra day waiting for business. (I know my DM hasn't forgotten me or the other three drivers cooling heels at truck stops.)

No stress living is better for the heart and soul.

Brett and Errol, I really don't think I could have said it better myself. I'll give ya an example: We got a load we obtained in a suburb of Seattle last night. I had to drive between 30 and 40 mph with the hazards on across Washington state because the winds were that bad. Also when I got into Idaho on I-90 towards Coure D'Alene, (I hope I spelled that right) the roads were EXTREMELY icy and mountainous and curvy so I took it slow and steady and then went down Lookout Pass into Montana. You want beautiful, that's some beautiful country there, anyway the DOT had warning signs up saying Watch for Ice on bridges and for black ice on the roadways. The temp was in the Lower 20s so definitely cold enough to be hazardous. No wind through Idaho and Montana, however Ice and mountainous and curvy roads I had to drive between 40 and 45mph with the hazards on also. I am now at the Flying J on I-90 EB, Exit 96 in Missoula, Montana and we are swappin drivers because I am tired and had a long shift even though I drove an abysmally low 440 miles tonight. At least they were safe and legal miles. Stay safe out here, take it slow and heed Brett and Errol's advice and it could save your career and your lives. 😁

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

In reference to not letting little things bother us, my Dad has a saying, "In five years, you'll have forgotten all about it". So...you can add that to the mantra list if you like :-)

I use the mantra

double-quotes-start.png

I Don't Care

double-quotes-end.png

Not to mean I don't give a rats's hiney, but to remind myself that whatever it is isn't all that important in my day's work. Whether it's following 2mph slower for a bit, another truck trying to squeeze past on the right (disappearing) lane or 30 minutes wait at a dock, or even an extra day waiting for business. (I know my DM hasn't forgotten me or the other three drivers cooling heels at truck stops.)

No stress living is better for the heart and soul.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Linden R.'s Comment
member avatar
Connecticut is a pretty state.

Said no New Englander ever

Gladhand's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Connecticut is a pretty state.

double-quotes-end.png

Said no New Englander ever

Don't know if tongue in cheek or serious haha, but I really liked driving over to Beacon Falls. The river that ran along the road kind of reminded me of a road back in New Mexico. Always though Connecticut and other northeast States were concrete jungles.

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