What Is Your Money Maker?

Topic 21722 | Page 1

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Errol V.'s Comment
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Of all the things you do as a truck driver, what do you consider the thing you do, that you have, the action that you pay attention to, that is most responsible for really making your money?

For example, Safe Driving is something you do, and without it I bet you won't be making much money. I use safety as an example, since it is a thing every driver needs to pay attention to. But what is it that you believe keeps you rolling for the big Trucker bucks?

If you list yourself as "Experienced Driver", hold off for 24 hours so the students and rookies can make a guess.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
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I would say, learning my clock management, and trip planning. As I get better at both, I am seeing my miles increase. Safety is always a focused as I do this m

Turtle's Comment
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Clock management, and keeping my left door closed. I get it done when I can. There will always be unexpected delays. Those are the times to relax. Till then, I roll.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
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If you list yourself as "Experienced Driver", hold off for 24 hours so the students and rookies can make a guess.

Oh man! I already had my hand raised when I read that.

smile.gif

LDRSHIP's Comment
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Brett, we already know your response. 'Building and running an awesome informative web site.' LoL

Fatsquatch 's Comment
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Is 23 hours and 24 minutes close enough? smile.gif

Communication, and maintaining a good relationship with my fleet manager. That way when (not if) things go sideways, I know things will be taken care of. Loads can be swapped, appointments can be changed, but only if he knows what's going on.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Errol V.'s Comment
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Gee, I don't recall any other topic where people actually waited for "time's up". (Or any other topics that had a time restriction for that matter.)

Ok, 24 hours have passed.

I agree with Fatsquatch. Your relationship with your DM/ dispatcher had the greatest effect on your paycheck. They control your professional life. They can really keep you rolling, or let you sit for a day or two.

I've already recommended here, do what you can to be a go-to for your DM . You'll be glad you did.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Calkansan's Comment
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Master your clock. Master trip planning. Communication with your DM. Nothing pays more than cents per mile (CPM). When the wheels are turning, you make the most. By mastering your clock, you use a majority of your clock driving. Communication so when you get that 3 day, 500 mile load, you can offer alternative plans to keep running. Top tier drivers want to deliver early or T call at yard to keep running. If you don't communicate with DM , how will they know what you want. A real life example; I had to drop current load at receiver 2 miles away from yard, then take empty to shipper (30 miles) and PU preloaded trailer for next load. Instead doing it on 1 day, I had enough time on clock to drop current load in yard, take empty to shipper, PU preloaded and drop in yard. Hook up to original trailer and take 10 hour break. Next day, deliver original load, drop empty in yard, hook up to new load and go. This saved me 2 hours of clock. That's an extra 120 miles on that days shift. Planning and implementing these little things can make big differences in pay.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

At least for me not a simple answer, but overall effective clock management.

The three criteria positively effecting it are; experience, skills and knowledge. All of which contribute to the money maker opportunity on the Walmart Dedicated Account I am assigned to.

Experience knowing all of the navigation variables required driving to each of the daily dispatched stops. Experience knowing the routes and the best and least resistant path to each of the store docks.

Developed operational and communication skills that enable safe and efficient passage into and out of each store delivery and backhaul. Practiced relationship building skills with driver management, dispatch and perhaps most important, the end customer Walmart. Skills that minimize the amount of time needed for getting to the dock area, setting-up and backing into each dock.

Knowledge gained through listening, reading and trip-planning. I never stop learning; striving to be a "learn-it-all"

The conclusion; all three of these areas positively contribute to effective clock management, enabling the most "paid work" performed within the HOS parameters.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

For me it's definitely about having a great working relationship with "the right people" at my company. Excellent time management and my willingness to tackle any problem load without complaint sure helps too.

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