Interested In Roehl And Swift Paid CDL Training

Topic 22026 | Page 1

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Don's Comment
member avatar

I'm interested in applying for paid cdl training with a few different companies and I would love to hear some feedback from their current drivers, especially Roehl and Swift.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I have driven for Swift for 5 years; Errol (now a Swift instructor) and JJ about 3, DanielSahn and Chris M (now a flatbedder) roughly a year.

Ask away...!

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

PJ used to drive for Roehl, several others still do.

Rainy, Bud, Turtle (flatbedder) and several others; Prime-ates.

Old School is a Knight Dedicated to SAPA flatbedder.

Schneider is Unholychaos

What other companies do you want to talk about?

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

millionmiler24's Comment
member avatar

PJ used to drive for Roehl, several others still do.

Rainy, Bud, Turtle (flatbedder) and several others; Prime-ates.

Old School is a Knight Dedicated to SAPA flatbedder.

Schneider is Unholychaos

What other companies do you want to talk about?

Me I am CRST Expedited to the core. 😁

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

Big Scott (CFI's biggest 's Comment
member avatar

I'm with CFI and am happy to answer any questions you may have. You can also put the name of the company you want info on, into the search bar at the top of this page. We are here to help.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’ve been with Roehl in the van division and did some refer work although not assigned to them, as well as having friends in the flatbed and curtainside division. I was at KLLM for a year and Quality Carriers a year and a half. I’m more than happy to share whatever info about those if anyone is interested.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Don's Comment
member avatar

PJ:

I am looking at Roehl's GYCDL program and driving flatbed for them. Questions I have are: 1. Quality of their training program?

2. How well are they in getting you home on the National fleet and/or Great Lakes Regional? Does Roehl really get you home for 2 days for every 11 days out (I live in NE Ohio)?

3. Roehl freight is mostly East of I-35, but are there opportunities to get out West? I realize I would be out longer if going West.

4. How is Roehl with helping/assisting new drivers transitioning to OTR?

5. Do they do well with reimbursements when drivers have expenses that pertain to needing truck supplies,etc.?

6. Regarding their "points system relating to .cpm and moving up in experience, are they fair with increasing .cpm. or do they "ding" drivers to keep .cpm or benefits, etc. down?

Any suggestions pertaing to how to do well driving for Roehl would be appreciated.

Glenn

I’ve been with Roehl in the van division and did some refer work although not assigned to them, as well as having friends in the flatbed and curtainside division. I was at KLLM for a year and Quality Carriers a year and a half. I’m more than happy to share whatever info about those if anyone is interested.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Glenn I went through their CDL school in late 2013 in Marshfield WI. I have a diary in the forum from my experiences back then. I was a driver trainer for law enforcement for 22 years and have some knowledge in the overall training areana. My estimation was their training program was top notch. From everything I still hear is it still is. I was national OTR in the van division for awhile then ran a dedicated account. They got me home to NE GA like clockwork. What I did OTR was figured the dates I wanted to go home when I first went out, that gave my DM time to work it out. Like everywhere else communication is key. My friends doing flatbed get home the same as I did. If they get you a load going close to home in 11 days then it works if not can be closer to the 14 days. Again the more time they have to prepare the better the outcome. They have a good size flatbed group out of Fontana Ca. My friend on curtainside goes out there routinely with door loads. They will send you farther west if your willing to stay out longer. They have always had alot if flatbed work all over the midwest.

The pay choice plan to me was always a bit confussing but I moved up based on my performance. It didn’t apply to the dedicated accounts back then. I also never was nickled and dimed on anything. If you do your job well, and don’t hit things they will treat you right.

They are no different than any other big carrier. They are geared toward taking new drivers and making them successful if they choose to be. I know they are also pretty forgiving of little mistakes. Big ones not so much.

Their terminals have shops and if you need supplies you get it their, or on a rare occassion you can get it off your fuel card at a truck stop. Get a relationship with the shop folks and you won’t have any issues. I used to carry alot of extras like filters and a couple sets of wiper blades because I got to know a maint guy fairly well.

I never had any need to get reimbursed for anything.

They are sticklers for following their fuel and route plans. Most of the time it was never an issue, but occassionally it was an issue. I understand why they do it, doesn’t mean I have to like it though. That was really the only negative I ever had with them.

They are a good company and treat folks well in my opinion. If you go in with a positive attitude, aren’t afraid to work, and take care of their equipment you will be successful.

If your interested in talking to them call Kim Calhoun in recruiting. She is still there and will tell you what you need to know without and recruiter talk. She is a great lady.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Glenn, you have some very good questions here. Another potential Roehl driver may also be interested in how the company handles these things. By using the search box (upper right of this page) they could enter "Roehl", and find your questions and the answers. Also, other drivers who know may also chime in with their experiences.

If you really do and to contact another member, say to arrange a meet-up, you need to post an email or phone number on the forum. Don't just post it like: "867-5309", but spell it out to avoid web scraping. I'd use "ate s!x sebben five tree oh nine"

Don's Comment
member avatar

Thank you PJ. I will contact Ms. Calhoun. Do I contact the recruiting number and ask for her, or does she have a direct number?

Glenn I went through their CDL school in late 2013 in Marshfield WI. I have a diary in the forum from my experiences back then. I was a driver trainer for law enforcement for 22 years and have some knowledge in the overall training areana. My estimation was their training program was top notch. From everything I still hear is it still is. I was national OTR in the van division for awhile then ran a dedicated account. They got me home to NE GA like clockwork. What I did OTR was figured the dates I wanted to go home when I first went out, that gave my DM time to work it out. Like everywhere else communication is key. My friends doing flatbed get home the same as I did. If they get you a load going close to home in 11 days then it works if not can be closer to the 14 days. Again the more time they have to prepare the better the outcome. They have a good size flatbed group out of Fontana Ca. My friend on curtainside goes out there routinely with door loads. They will send you farther west if your willing to stay out longer. They have always had alot if flatbed work all over the midwest.

The pay choice plan to me was always a bit confussing but I moved up based on my performance. It didn’t apply to the dedicated accounts back then. I also never was nickled and dimed on anything. If you do your job well, and don’t hit things they will treat you right.

They are no different than any other big carrier. They are geared toward taking new drivers and making them successful if they choose to be. I know they are also pretty forgiving of little mistakes. Big ones not so much.

Their terminals have shops and if you need supplies you get it their, or on a rare occassion you can get it off your fuel card at a truck stop. Get a relationship with the shop folks and you won’t have any issues. I used to carry alot of extras like filters and a couple sets of wiper blades because I got to know a maint guy fairly well.

I never had any need to get reimbursed for anything.

They are sticklers for following their fuel and route plans. Most of the time it was never an issue, but occassionally it was an issue. I understand why they do it, doesn’t mean I have to like it though. That was really the only negative I ever had with them.

They are a good company and treat folks well in my opinion. If you go in with a positive attitude, aren’t afraid to work, and take care of their equipment you will be successful.

If your interested in talking to them call Kim Calhoun in recruiting. She is still there and will tell you what you need to know without and recruiter talk. She is a great lady.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

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