Got An Interview For A Local Position...

Topic 22385 | Page 1

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Chris's Comment
member avatar

So, I have an interview for a local position with a local beer distributing company that I used to work for. I used to be a truck helper there, then went off and got my CDL and started driving for Melton. I LOVE what I do, but I also love my son and wife. I honestly didn't expect an interview from this company.

My delimma and why I am posting here. I want to be home every night and have those 2 days off a week, go to the gym and start lifting again, cook in a stable environment, but I'm gonna miss my big blue were, errr truck.

What do you suggest for me to get the heck over myself?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chris's Comment
member avatar

I'll also note, I've been driving for them for awhile, I'm not just up and leaving. This has become a way of life for me, but I feel the need to change it, even though flatbedding, I find myself skimping on meals and errr... gaining weight.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Well the first question is why are you really considering leaving the job where you're at? Is it for your wife and kids or is it because you've put on a few pounds?

Not only that, but do you think you're going to manually unload beer trucks all day and go lift weights regularly? How much do you think the body can take?

Putting on a few pounds or wanting to lift weights is no reason to leave a great job, especially considering the one you're thinking of taking. I think that beer job is going to make it extremely difficult to get back to weightlifting properly anyhow.

Seeing your family more often is a fantastic reason to leave a job you love. If being away from home isn't working for you and your family you should find something local.

Just be realistic and honest with yourself about your choices. Think them through thoroughly. Really consider the good and the bad of any potential choices you're making.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

The upside of this is that you're familiar with what you'd be doing. I'll be honest, doing foodservice nearly daily I ask myself why I'm doing this to myself. The last thing I want to think about doing after I finish working is going to the gym (not just cuz I'm overweight!). I'm not sure what the average load you have weighs but mine are 16k or so lately. Would you be given a helper or is it all by yourself? Here in my market they all run solo unless training. Not trying to encourage, or deter you just something to think about. With my family situation i felt OTR wouldn't mesh well. It is nice being home every night however many times it's only for my 10 off. Get done with work and I gotta shower, eat, try to spend time with my wife and kids and then squeeze sleep in. Most nights I'm only sleeping 4 to 5 hours. Honestly, with how little I'm around other than weekends my wife has told me numerous times to go OTR, that she feels it would be easier on her and the kids instead of me being too tired when I get home. I should also add that I'm supposed to be on a 4 day work week however being short staffed is making me work 5 days and in those 5 days I'm putting in at least 60 hours. Also something to think about, all that physical labor is going to take a toll on your body, and I don't view it as a long term career (in my opinion). If you look at the kind of guys doing it you'll see probably 95% of them are under 35 years old. I work with a guy in his early 60s, doing food service over 40 years but you can tell his body is shot. Constantly needing cortisone shots in knees, walking with a significant limp and having something in his back to shock his nerves in his back just to function. If offered a position and you take it I'd love to hear about it

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Harry H. [ navypoppop ]'s Comment
member avatar

Considering that you are questioning if you should go local or not is a personal decision and yours alone. Speaking from a long 45 year career I started over the road for many years then new jobs were considered regional which is the best in my opinion. They offer a mix of longhaul and local with some great hometime mixed in. What the other responders have stated is fact. Look at what you are saying about working local and going to the gym. It probably will not happen because long days on the job do not allow for gym time unless you are spending the weekends doing it which will kill your hometime. Take some dumb bells in the cab with you, use the work out rooms at the truck stops and walk around the lot often. Do not make the move until you look at all the options as you might "shoot yourself in the foot".

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

I'd go local, just never beer or produce distributors. Too labor intensive.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

I’ll throw my .02 in here. I don’t know ya’ll or your situation. In my situation I tried being home every day and it actually hurt our relationship. My wife and I were both single alot of years and became very independant. We love each other dearly but also still need our individual space. I work 4-5 days a week and get 2-3 days off. It works well for us. Being home to just eat/sleep is not really being home. Your not engaged in the family. If your current hometime schedule works I wouldn’t mess with it.

Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

When is your interview?

Jason R.'s Comment
member avatar

For me I live in an area where there are around 100 or more trucking companies. I am currently OTR but I was local with great hours 7a-3p got a salary until I herniated a disc in my neck and required surgery and a plate in my neck. I was on work comp for 8 mos, then I found myself at square one. Most of the local companies work 12-14hr days where I am at because they go over the 100 air mile rules. So for me it was no different than being over the road , I rarely saw my children except for weekends, so now I am back OTR and making a little more money, but I am in no different of a situation.

If the hours a good hours and you will see your children and wife more, I would say give it a shot. Just remember though that it’s going to be an adjustment being home all the time vs OTR. I took an OTR position with this current company as they have local 12hr positions that pay hourly plus overtime. I just have to run this until a local opens up, however with being the sole provider as I have 3 children daycare age, I am in it for the money and if OTR averages more than the 1300 week gross the local pays, I will stay OTR until the kids get a little older and are all in school as not to have to pay daycare costs.

You are truly going to have to figure out your motivation to go local, and it’s a decision you and your wife have to discuss. I will tell you no one on here is going to fault you one way or the other, as I will be happy for you and your family no matter the decision. Remember happy wife, happy life.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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