CRST - Training Adventures In Cedar Rapids

Topic 22473 | Page 12

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G-Town's Comment
member avatar

If this "Nervous Nelly" can do it, I know you can too. You WILL pass your next drive. Find that curb on Google maps and study it from all angles. That's what I did with the turn in Neosho that was a concern.

Don that's fine when the intersection Jeremy described is clear, but it wasn't, and it may not be the next time he approaches it.

Google maps is great...,really is. Use it all the time. But it will never replace the developed sense of sizing up a real-time situation and quickly determining an approach for navigating a tight turn when other traffic is present.

Yes Google it, great idea, but please do not lose sight of my advice on how-to handle an intersection like that.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks for the encouragement, everyone!

I can get this, just bumping my way through. And I'd surely rather get through as many bumps as I can now rather than later (there are probably still many to come later, lol.)

There is no road tests tomorrow over at the school, so I have to wait until Sunday. Just woke up from a well-earned nap, and to be honest, I'm actually pretty happy for a day of downtime. It's time to relax and regroup, get my head back in the game. And finally for the first day in weeks I might sleep in until 6 or 7am!

Have a great weekend and safe travels!

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Jeremy, I feel your pain wholeheartedly!! I failed my second road test for the same thing but in the opposite. I approached the turning lane, I stalled the truck cause I forgot the splitter. I missed the first & had to wait for the light again. The light turned green for both directions. I forgot I was in Missouri & pulled up across the line, the examiner freaked out & said brake 3x. He thought I was going to pull into the oncoming traffic. When we returned to the pad, I apologized for scaring him but I told him that we don’t do that in NYC, we’ll never get through the intersection. He said he saw me turning the wheel. I said it didn’t matter cause he’d failed me anyway & that I just wanted to apologize.

Made it on my last try after an evaluator took me out to drive around town in the middle of rush hour traffic. I hadn’t done that with my trainer at all. So that really built my confidence, along with the fact that the rush traffic in Springfield doesn’t come close to the traffic I’m used to in NYC. Sending you good vibes & lotsa luck on your next exam. Breathe, take your time & watch your wagon.

Don's Comment
member avatar

G-town, I understand what you are saying. In time, we newbies should develop that sense you are referring to. Until I do, I will try to find any and all advantages and tools available to develop into the best driver I can. Whether those advantages come from listening to recommendations from experienced drivers such as yourself, technology and driver's groups/forums on social media, it certainly will all help.

Looking at that difficult turn I was referring to before on Google maps and street view helped me to assess what angles to use to get through it. A few drivers from the class ahead of us failed their first road test because they ran over the curb. One of my classmates also failed her first drive for the same. The rest of us looked at the turn and developed a plan to get through it. Saying that, technology will never beat experience.

double-quotes-start.png

If this "Nervous Nelly" can do it, I know you can too. You WILL pass your next drive. Find that curb on Google maps and study it from all angles. That's what I did with the turn in Neosho that was a concern.

double-quotes-end.png

Don that's fine when the intersection Jeremy described is clear, but it wasn't, and it may not be the next time he approaches it.

Google maps is great...,really is. Use it all the time. But it will never replace the developed sense of sizing up a real-time situation and quickly determining an approach for navigating a tight turn when other traffic is present.

Yes Google it, great idea, but please do not lose sight of my advice on how-to handle an intersection like that.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I think we agree...using all of the tools is best no matter what career stage you are in.

I use Google's satellite overhead view all the time to refresh my memory of a Walmart store dock I haven't delivered to in a while.

Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

Well, tomorrow should be my last road test. If so, I'll have the paperwork I need for my CDL which I'll go get on Tuesday (Iowa DMV is never open on Monday.)

Also, once I pass the road test tomorrow, I should start company orientation on Monday. That consists of three days worth of paperwork and such so you can get a company ID, employee number, etc. After that, they will assign me to a lead driver and off I go for a month of OTR training. And finally after that I should get paired up with my buddy whom I really hope to have as a co-driver.

Some explanation for those who don't know what I'm talking about...

When you finish training anywhere (private or company) most companies like to send you out on the road with a trainer for about 30 days. Old School wrote a great article here on the site about trainers and what to expect from them.

At CRST, they refer to their trainers as lead drivers. Other companies might use other titles, but I'm at CRST so I use their terminology here.

I had someone that was going to do me a favor and help me get assigned to a particular lead driver, but that seems like it may not work out, so I will probably save the favor and just go with whomever they assign me to.

As for a co-driver, that is just what it sounds like. Someone who shares the living space in the truck with you and shares the driving (and other responsibilities) with you. Some companies run solo drivers and some run teams, and some run both.

And then there are also private owner/operators whom run solo or run team (usually a husband and wife team) but that's another topic for another time. Most people visiting this site for the first time or those newly interested in trucking won't be ( or shouldn't be) thinking or worrying about being an owner/Op anywhere near the beginning.

For anyone that stumbles across this, i hope that sheds some more light on things here at CRST in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. I'm due for an exam tomorrow, so I need to get some sleep. Take care and be well.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Good luck with your road test today. Go slow, be safe, watch the signs and don't overthink it.

millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

Well, tomorrow should be my last road test. If so, I'll have the paperwork I need for my CDL which I'll go get on Tuesday (Iowa DMV is never open on Monday.)

Also, once I pass the road test tomorrow, I should start company orientation on Monday. That consists of three days worth of paperwork and such so you can get a company ID, employee number, etc. After that, they will assign me to a lead driver and off I go for a month of OTR training. And finally after that I should get paired up with my buddy whom I really hope to have as a co-driver.

Some explanation for those who don't know what I'm talking about...

When you finish training anywhere (private or company) most companies like to send you out on the road with a trainer for about 30 days. Old School wrote a great article here on the site about trainers and what to expect from them.

At CRST, they refer to their trainers as lead drivers. Other companies might use other titles, but I'm at CRST so I use their terminology here.

I had someone that was going to do me a favor and help me get assigned to a particular lead driver, but that seems like it may not work out, so I will probably save the favor and just go with whomever they assign me to.

As for a co-driver, that is just what it sounds like. Someone who shares the living space in the truck with you and shares the driving (and other responsibilities) with you. Some companies run solo drivers and some run teams, and some run both.

And then there are also private owner/operators whom run solo or run team (usually a husband and wife team) but that's another topic for another time. Most people visiting this site for the first time or those newly interested in trucking won't be ( or shouldn't be) thinking or worrying about being an owner/Op anywhere near the beginning.

For anyone that stumbles across this, i hope that sheds some more light on things here at CRST in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. I'm due for an exam tomorrow, so I need to get some sleep. Take care and be well.

Jeremy, I should be in Cedar Rapids by the end of the day today. I sure want to meet you before you go out with your Lead Driver.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
millionmiler24 (CRST Amba's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

Well, tomorrow should be my last road test. If so, I'll have the paperwork I need for my CDL which I'll go get on Tuesday (Iowa DMV is never open on Monday.)

Also, once I pass the road test tomorrow, I should start company orientation on Monday. That consists of three days worth of paperwork and such so you can get a company ID, employee number, etc. After that, they will assign me to a lead driver and off I go for a month of OTR training. And finally after that I should get paired up with my buddy whom I really hope to have as a co-driver.

Some explanation for those who don't know what I'm talking about...

When you finish training anywhere (private or company) most companies like to send you out on the road with a trainer for about 30 days. Old School wrote a great article here on the site about trainers and what to expect from them.

At CRST, they refer to their trainers as lead drivers. Other companies might use other titles, but I'm at CRST so I use their terminology here.

I had someone that was going to do me a favor and help me get assigned to a particular lead driver, but that seems like it may not work out, so I will probably save the favor and just go with whomever they assign me to.

As for a co-driver, that is just what it sounds like. Someone who shares the living space in the truck with you and shares the driving (and other responsibilities) with you. Some companies run solo drivers and some run teams, and some run both.

And then there are also private owner/operators whom run solo or run team (usually a husband and wife team) but that's another topic for another time. Most people visiting this site for the first time or those newly interested in trucking won't be ( or shouldn't be) thinking or worrying about being an owner/Op anywhere near the beginning.

For anyone that stumbles across this, i hope that sheds some more light on things here at CRST in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. I'm due for an exam tomorrow, so I need to get some sleep. Take care and be well.

double-quotes-end.png

Jeremy, I should be in Cedar Rapids by the end of the day today. I sure want to meet you before you go out with your Lead Driver.

Hey Jeremy, do you have an email address I can contact you at when I arrive?

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jeremy C.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

Well, tomorrow should be my last road test. If so, I'll have the paperwork I need for my CDL which I'll go get on Tuesday (Iowa DMV is never open on Monday.)

Also, once I pass the road test tomorrow, I should start company orientation on Monday. That consists of three days worth of paperwork and such so you can get a company ID, employee number, etc. After that, they will assign me to a lead driver and off I go for a month of OTR training. And finally after that I should get paired up with my buddy whom I really hope to have as a co-driver.

Some explanation for those who don't know what I'm talking about...

When you finish training anywhere (private or company) most companies like to send you out on the road with a trainer for about 30 days. Old School wrote a great article here on the site about trainers and what to expect from them.

At CRST, they refer to their trainers as lead drivers. Other companies might use other titles, but I'm at CRST so I use their terminology here.

I had someone that was going to do me a favor and help me get assigned to a particular lead driver, but that seems like it may not work out, so I will probably save the favor and just go with whomever they assign me to.

As for a co-driver, that is just what it sounds like. Someone who shares the living space in the truck with you and shares the driving (and other responsibilities) with you. Some companies run solo drivers and some run teams, and some run both.

And then there are also private owner/operators whom run solo or run team (usually a husband and wife team) but that's another topic for another time. Most people visiting this site for the first time or those newly interested in trucking won't be ( or shouldn't be) thinking or worrying about being an owner/Op anywhere near the beginning.

For anyone that stumbles across this, i hope that sheds some more light on things here at CRST in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. I'm due for an exam tomorrow, so I need to get some sleep. Take care and be well.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Jeremy, I should be in Cedar Rapids by the end of the day today. I sure want to meet you before you go out with your Lead Driver.

double-quotes-end.png

Hey Jeremy, do you have an email address I can contact you at when I arrive?

Yes, sir. But I shouldnt be hard to find. I'll be the loudest one out back at the picnic tables - CAUSE I JUST PASSED MY LAST EXAM! Get my CDL as soon as the DMV opens on Tuesday!
smile.gif

Just find the big tattoed guy that can't stop smiling!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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