WHY DO CSR DO THIS ?

Topic 22710 | Page 1

Page 1 of 1
Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

So I had a load the other day that I couldn’t make because I ran out of hours after the previous load I dropped. And the next load was scheduled 2-3 hrs later. So I contacted Driver Leader and they talked to csr. The csr are told me and I quote. “ They will load you tomorrow at 07:00”. I’m thinking ok cool so they set up a different appointment time. But when I got there the next day the boss man said. We don’t open on The Weeknd’s. I’m just confused on why csr would do that ? It sounded like csr talked to the company and made a reschedule appointment. But in reality they didn’t talk to them at all

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

Welcome to trucking. That stuff happens. What company are you driving for? Are you hauling dry van or refer? I can think of two times I was given appointments only to show up and find the place closed? When this happens, I get great detention and enjoy the extra rest. As a new driver, are you having problems managing your clock? Many new drivers, myself included, have trouble with their clock. One main reason is backing. It takes longer. So, a drop hook takes two or three hours instead of one. It takes longer to get into a dock. Once we start our clock, the 14 hour clock doesn't stop. As soon as you think you have a problem call or message your DM right away. I hope this helps. Good luck.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

Welcome to the daily life of my wife, she is a dispatcher and talks to warehouse managers, brokers, csr, and everyone else on an hourly basis. Except the only difference is when this happens they go straight to attack mode on the dispatcher who they accuse of "lying to them followed by a few insults."

Anyways, just brush it off. Just a simple miscommunciation. Next time don't accept a load unless you're 110% sure you have enough hours to complete it. So in the end you could have prevented this from happening by not being late.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Well the thing is I didn’t accept the load some one committed the load for me. I didn’t realize it was on me. :/ but the other factor that went into my lost of time was traffic was backed up because of an accident in the middle of the road :(

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Well the thing is I didn’t accept the load some one committed the load for me. I didn’t realize it was on me. :/ but the other factor that went into my lost of time was traffic was backed up because of an accident in the middle of the road :(

Rather surprised to hear that.

Swift sends pre-plans to the driver's QC. How did you not know they put you on the load? Even if you DL accepted/committed you on it, it would have come across your QC at least once.

Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Well i saw both but I only accepted the first one. But once I did my empty call I was dispatch on the second one

Chris M's Comment
member avatar

You can't just ignore the preplan. As a company driver, when you're sent a preplan, it's not really the company "offering" you a load. It's the company telling you what your next load is, unless there is a legitimate reason for not taking the load. Not having the HOS available to complete the pickup, or delivery on time, is a legitimate reason. Thats why the counter option is available. Always counter with the times you can legally make. I've only totally rejected a load twice, and both times were due to having a hometime request that was important, that the load would interfere with. Both times I got a message apologizing for the oversight and the load was removed and another load found.

But bottom line, a preplan is not a question of whether you're assigned that load or not.

TWIC:

Transportation Worker Identification Credential

Truck drivers who regularly pick up from or deliver to the shipping ports will often be required to carry a TWIC card.

Your TWIC is a tamper-resistant biometric card which acts as both your identification in secure areas, as well as an indicator of you having passed the necessary security clearance. TWIC cards are valid for five years. The issuance of TWIC cards is overseen by the Transportation Security Administration and the Department of Homeland Security.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Oh ok. I’m beginning my second month solo. So I’m still learning everything

Errol V.'s Comment
member avatar

Bryan sees things:

Well i saw both but I only accepted the first one. But once I did my empty call I was dispatch on the second one

When dispatches/pre-plans come across your Qualcomm screen, they are assigned to you. Maybe what you thought was reply to "accept" was actually acknowledging. If you get more than one assignment in a pre-plan it's because after the first delivery you'll be in the right place for the next pickup. So it's very rough to pick one but not the other.

At Swift you can turn down a load, but you must select that option and have a reasonable reason.

And in turning down loads you might give your DL the impression you're picky. Which often means you'll spend lots of time waiting for your next load.

As for time management, that's something you'll learn. In my first few months I got to spend a weekend in a shopping center parking lot because I tried to make a delivery on a Sunday. (Yes, the receiver was closed for weekends.)

Serious traffic back-ups are acceptable for delays, but the receiver may not be so understanding. Use Google maps to keep updated with traffic. In most cases you can use Google's suggestions for traffic detours.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Bryan Q.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks Errol ! I have a great driver leader she gives me the miles. All this just so happened when she was on vacation for a few days :/ but yes I use google maps a lot. Time management I still got to work on. I get to my places on time. And sometimes these locations are so out of the wall I’m there on time but I miss it because it may be a hidden entrance lol.

Page 1 of 1

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More