Help...it Scared The Crud Out Of Me...

Topic 22995 | Page 1

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MissIncognito's Comment
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Hello, In school and on lunch right now... We are driving today, something I am doing fairly well at. My scare was wet roads, empty trailer, and a sneaky red light....2 of them. The first one I was able to catch it and did my stab breaking. The second one practically didn't make it....and my trailer sliding and my instructor just saying no no no. He told us he's not a believer in panic stops.... So some advice please, on either to run it, down shift? Just stab break?

Old School's Comment
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Start slowing down early on as you approach an intersection. This is something you'll learn over time. Traffic lights can really play havoc with big trucks. You have to be able to anticipate them by reading other signals that can give you a clue to how much time you have. Things like the walk signal for pedestrians (it's counting down how many seconds you have), or how long the line of cars is that's stopped at the red signal.

This is all part of the "Smith Sytem" and knowing what's going on all around you. You'll develop a sense for these situations, but it will take some time. In the mean time, treat those intersections with care and caution. Always approach them slowly and cautiously, no matter the color of your light.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Army 's Comment
member avatar

Hello

G-Town posted a response (previously) to someone who had possibly gotten upset because he got a preventable for running a red light I think. The term G-Town used was a "stale light" maybe, and to this day, I think if that when I am driving my pickup thru intersections. I believe it was to remind the drivers, the longer you see a green light, the better than chance it is going to change on you at the last minute.

Safe Travels. Chris

Dave (formerly known as K's Comment
member avatar

Hello

G-Town posted a response (previously) to someone who had possibly gotten upset because he got a preventable for running a red light I think. The term G-Town used was a "stale light" maybe, and to this day, I think if that when I am driving my pickup thru intersections. I believe it was to remind the drivers, the longer you see a green light, the better than chance it is going to change on you at the last minute.

Safe Travels. Chris

I'm going to "borrow" that "stale light" saying!! smile.gif

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I approach every light as if it is going to change. look WAY ahead to the lights past yours. how long did it take to change?

choose a "no return point" if the light changes after that point, you go. If you have to, slow way down and put your hazards on. people around you wont know if you are having engine trouble or if someone is in front of you... whatever. that cant work on the exam, but in the real world until you feel comfortable... hey whatever you gotta do to not hit something. ive heard guys blowing the air horns through the intersections to alert others hes coming.

also, try driving at night for awhile. many night lights are on sensors so they stay green longer. as you gain experience downshifting it will get much easier.

if the light changes with the tractor in the intersection you are good. dont be slamming on brakes.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Hello

G-Town posted a response (previously) to someone who had possibly gotten upset because he got a preventable for running a red light I think. The term G-Town used was a "stale light" maybe, and to this day, I think if that when I am driving my pickup thru intersections. I believe it was to remind the drivers, the longer you see a green light, the better than chance it is going to change on you at the last minute.

Safe Travels. Chris

That is absolutely correct Chris!

My approach is identical to that of Old School and Rainy. Always, always, always be prepared to stop. Situational awareness is that much more critical when empty and in the rain or snow. To the OP, reduce your speed accordingly. I think you were moving a bit too fast for conditions. Slow it down when wet and empty. Less traction. I’ve actually seen empty trailers hop. In the rain, that’s a “jack-knife” in the making.

I’m glad you got through it without hitting anything.

Safe travels.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

I'm not so sure you need to use stab braking for this scenario. When driving in city traffic and having to stop and go I just use the Jake and regular braking along with down shifting. I will use stab braking along with the Jake and properly selected gear for down grades when loaded heavy. If I am light enough all I need is the jake to control my speed.

Maybe your instructor is teaching that so I dont want to go against what your being taught. Anybody want to clarify or am I wrong?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I'm not so sure you need to use stab braking for this scenario. When driving in city traffic and having to stop and go I just use the Jake and regular braking along with down shifting. I will use stab braking along with the Jake and properly selected gear for down grades when loaded heavy. If I am light enough all I need is the jake to control my speed.

Maybe your instructor is teaching that so I dont want to go against what your being taught. Anybody want to clarify or am I wrong?

I agree with JuiceBox on this. Apply steady brake...but my suggestion; Old School and Rainy still applies. Please read all of the replies, all important and relevant.

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I'm not so sure you need to use stab braking for this scenario. When driving in city traffic and having to stop and go I just use the Jake and regular braking along with down shifting. I will use stab braking along with the Jake and properly selected gear for down grades when loaded heavy. If I am light enough all I need is the jake to control my speed.

Maybe your instructor is teaching that so I dont want to go against what your being taught. Anybody want to clarify or am I wrong?

double-quotes-end.png

I agree with JuiceBox on this. Apply steady brake...but my suggestion; Old School and Rainy still applies. Please read all of the replies, all important and relevant.

Yes sorry, I didn't mean to trump all previous replies. I use all methods described above when approaching intersections. IMO, intersections are the most dangerous situations you can encounter on the road, throw in adverse weather and its 10x more dangerous.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Some people say you cant downshift with the jake on. this is a load of crap. i ha e always done it. someone else said it took them months cause it seemed awkward.

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