Schneider Training Is Changing

Topic 23105 | Page 2

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Patrick C.'s Comment
member avatar

Just as an example of how companies change directions. The company I work for, H. O. Wolding, had a period where they had a second terminal. It was in Moulton, AL. They even had their own CDL training. They have since shutdown both. Companies change things all the time.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Adam J.'s Comment
member avatar

I looked into schnieder to get my CDL and was told they did not do company sponsored training , but that was about a year and a half ago. If it is true they are doing training I guess I should check with them again

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Company Sponsored Training:

A Company-Sponsored Training Program is a school that is owned and operated by a trucking company.

The schooling often requires little or no money up front. Instead of paying up-front tuition you will sign an agreement to work for the company for a specified amount of time after graduation, usually around a year, at a slightly lower rate of pay in order to pay for the training.

If you choose to quit working for the company before your year is up, they will normally require you to pay back a prorated amount of money for the schooling. The amount you pay back will be comparable to what you would have paid if you went to an independently owned school.

Company-sponsored training can be an excellent way to get your career underway if you can't afford the tuition up front for private schooling.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

I have been at this almost a year. I am Far from hitting my stride. I have a 100% on time record, and am in the top 5 of my FM's board. But there is so much more to this, then just the big 3 of driving, trip planning, and clock management. Each has a sub list a mile long, and they all intertwine. Hitting that snooze button 9 too many times, waiting longer between beverages while driving, squeeking out a few more miles to the next stop, to better position yourself. Knowing when you are fatigued. Better setting up backing. Taking alternate routes.

This site, does give us a giant step up, over many of our peers, but that is all it is, a step. The rest is up to us to figure out, to maximize our time, getting the best miles possible.

Schneider going back to their own training is awesome for new potential drivers. It also makes sense, for their bottom line, and driver retention.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Robsteeler's Comment
member avatar

Trainco IS an excellent school. I won't say anything bad about it, but it's not the same as the trucking company so it won't concentrate on the same things. Some of you might remember how much difficult I had with the alley dock. I cried and moaned all over this forum! Lol! 😂 The others in my group here at Schneider didn't do alley dock in school, so they were behind the curve. I was picked to go first by the instructor and was able to get it in with no problem. The Schneider instructor walked the others through and I paid attention to that. When my turn came again I did it his way and it was stupidily easy to do. Companies worry about efficiency that a school that's training you to pass a DOT test doesn't.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Adam J.'s Comment
member avatar

I just checked the website for schnieder. Unless they have not updated the information (which is possible) they say you need to have the CDL prior to orientation.

https://schneiderjobs.com/company-drivers/orientation-and-safety

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Army 's Comment
member avatar

Robsteeler

So where are you with Schnieder now? Are you with a trainer OTR?

Chris

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Individual experiences may vary.

Yes Prime has a vast ongoing wealth of training resources. Classes, readily accessible videos, on going training, etc.

BUT, 9 months driving, to include one Winter season, no reportable instances, maintaining a .08 or mpg consistently does NOT a trainer make.

I myself for lucky and pulled an excellent trainer. I've also have heard some real hard stories.

As a rookie driver, the day I think I know it all? There's nothing left to learn is the day I need to retire my CDL'S and take it to the house

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Wolverine's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I think Todd F. is ASKING if Trainco is a bad school!

double-quotes-end.png

Yes sir, I'm quite aware of that. I wasn't scolding him. I hoped to give him the bigger picture. Everybody wants to focus on companies and schools as being "bad or good," and that approach usually keeps them from finding the path to success in this career.

Yes, it was a question poorly worded on my part. The reason I asked was I was recently accepted by Maverick, and am seriously considering going through their CDL program in Little Rock. But also thought about staying home and paying out of pocket and going to local CDL program, Trainco is one of a very few options locally around me.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Wolverine, you'll find that we very much prefer the paid CDL training programs over private schools. I wrote an article about it. Check this out if you haven't already:

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training Over Private CDL Training

I'm regularly in contact with many of the companies who offer paid CDL training and every last one of them says they're having much better success with the students they train themselves than they are the students they're getting from private schools.

Now that's not to say all private schools are bad schools. But think about just one aspect of this. If you pay a private school up front for training, they have your money already. Now they have to train you, right? Whether or not you get your CDL doesn't affect their pay. They still get paid. Not only that, but they're trying to turn a profit. If you give them $5,000 for training, they're going to train you in whatever way costs them the least amount of money. That means you're going to get as little time in a truck as they can get away with and still get you that CDL. Time in the trucks is very expensive for them - fuel, maintenance, insurance, and a trainer to be in the truck with you.

Finally, once you're trained you're out of there. You're going to work somewhere else and you're not their problem anymore. So if you're trained well enough to squeak by on your CDL exam then that's the best possible scenario for them. They make the most money they can from you. The fact that you're not very well trained isn't their problem. It's someone else's problem. Unfortunately in the business world that's the basis for most decisions - profit. It has to be if you want to remain in business for long.

The companies that offer training are training you to work for them. The better you're trained the more productive you're going to be and the more money they're going to make someday in return. So it's in their best interest to train you well enough to be a safe, productive driver. They don't get paid up front. They pay the money up front to train you and have to recoup that investment from your success as a driver.

Read this article to get the full scoop:

Why I Prefer Paid CDL Training Over Private CDL Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Wolverine's Comment
member avatar

All very strong points Brett thank you. I have read your online book, listened to all your podcast (some more than once) and read through many of your and others articles. Currently going over the HRTP. This site has been a wealth of knowledge for me. I am pretty sure I will be going to Mavericks CDL program, just considering all my options.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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