Instructor Announced 1st Time EVER Newbie Hiring @ UPS & J.B. Hunt!

Topic 23132 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

At the start of class today (Tech. College "400 hour" weekends class)...

School was informed that both J.B. Hunt and UPS are now hiring newly licensed CDL drivers for the first time EVER!

UPS salaries allegedly range from $100k to $175k with Teamster's Union benefits.

J.B. Hunt apparently just signed 71 new driver route agreements in S.E. WI. He read us the email where the area contact almost begged the school to work with them. We have a job fair scheduled for October and Hunt will be running ads for drivers saying they will be at WCTC Job Fair (which is open to the public). These gigs are mostly "drop and hook" and get most drivers home every night!

I may need to rethink this OTR thing a bit!

Still want to travel the country, but if I can make the kind of money they are suggesting, I may be content to drive truck closer to home and just take my Newmar 38' Class A motorhome on the road for fun!

Looks like I could even upgrade to diesel pusher too!

J.B. Hunt gig sounds real tough NOT! Drive to Pleasant Prairie (about 25 mi. S. of MKE, about 35 mi. from home), drive to a Meijr location, drop and hook , repeat).

Started hooking, driving with trailers, dropping and hooking today! Backing maybe tomorrow... Doing great in turns and in the roundabout. Even learning to get along with the most tempermental tractor in the fleet. (She does not like being shifted above 1,200 RPMs).

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Oh boy... here we go again!

Marc, I've just about come to realize that every newbie in school will always take what their instructors say over what we say. It's a common theme played out in our forum repeatedly. I have no grand illusions that we are the final word on all things trucking, but I sure have witnessed a lot of people led down a rabbit hole with bad ideas when starting their trucking careers. We always teach that one of the most prudent ways of starting a trucking career is by Starting Your Career As An Over The Road Driver. That is backed up by solid statistics. It's not just some random idea or preference of ours.

I realize you are excited, and I'm not here to squelch that, but it is usually a dangerous thing when Prudence Is Lacking In A Rookie Driver's Approach To This Career. The benefits of one short year of over the road experience will far outweigh rushing into the pursuit of big money in trucking. Many a trucking career has been derailed completely by rushing headlong into a job where the driver was nowhere near prepared for the demands.

That's all I'm going to say at this point, but I'm convinced you need to take a much more cautious approach to this. Don't go chasing rainbows and pots of gold just yet. You've got a rude awakening lying just down the road. Throw on your flashers and slow down - there's trouble up ahead.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

175k??? For a UPS driver?

rofl-1.gif

If you believe that I have some beachfront property I want to sell you located in downtown Topeka Kansas.

Your instructor should be required to submit to a “random”, he’s smokin’ something and he blew it right up your tail end.

175k per year for any company driver is total barnyard, mid-summer simmering Bull Sh**...not gonna happen.

Rule #1, don’t believe everything you hear.

100k with UPS, maybe, but with years of experience and seniority. Don’t forget union dues come out of that...knocks it down quite a bit.

Let me offer some advice Marc; you don’t have your CDL yet, you just started, and have no basis or experience to call any gig EASY. I’ve seen the places where JBH drops their loads, you’d soil your drawers if you had to attempt it right now...and just as daunting the first several months of solo driving.

Rule #2, nothing is easy when you start this career...approach it with an over-confident, cavalier attitude and it will crush you like a bug in the blink of an eye.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Chip Bagg's Comment
member avatar

If it sounds to good to be true it's as good as that beachfront in Topeka. Last year JB hunt was advertising for veterans for local gigs or intermodal rather. Stating it didn't matter how much experience you had. So I bit and when I did they said o those positions are filled how about being home every 3 days though? And Ups be very careful. They currently have driver apprentice programs where I believe you work the warehouse and go out with a driver maybe a few times during shift. Union means seniority you're going to come into ups dropping and hooking all day 9 to 5. Dont rush it.

Intermodal:

Transporting freight using two or more transportation modes. An example would be freight that is moved by truck from the shipper's dock to the rail yard, then placed on a train to the next rail yard, and finally returned to a truck for delivery to the receiving customer.

In trucking when you hear someone refer to an intermodal job they're normally talking about hauling shipping containers to and from the shipyards and railyards.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Chip Bagg's Comment
member avatar

Meant you won't come in doing that!!!

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Thanks for all the comments...

I did say "Instructor Announced" and "salaries allegedly range from..."

Maybe even the salary thing is in question because it is my understanding that usually only dedicated routes are paid that way.

NOT discounting what you all are saying... just relaying what I was told. What seemed to be the big news (b.s.?) was the waiver of prior experience requirement.

Also... I realize "easy" was a bad choice... I know this won't be easy. What I meant was if it is even remotely as presented, it might not be a bad gig. A dist. warehouse nearby and delivery to stores in the area seemed, potentially, better than some alternatives. Guessing though, the reality will be more like Chicago during rush PERIODS, Co. GPS routing into low bridges, etc....

On another note... I got a call from the recruiter at and daughter of the owner of a local company. I met her Father at the DMV and when I asked if they hired new CDL drivers he replied "who doesn't?!?" I sent a nice follow-up letter which, as expected, found its way to her. She called to see how my training was going and we had a nice conversation. They do vans and flatbeds mostly regional , I think, if you believe their home-time claims. The only female in our class is an 18-year old young lady who works there.

FYI... While hometime makes a few things less complicated for me in the short-term, it is not really a major concern!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dedicated Route:

A driver or carrier who transports cargo between regular, prescribed routes. Normally it means a driver will be dedicated to working for one particular customer like Walmart or Home Depot and they will only haul freight for that customer. You'll often hear drivers say something like, "I'm on the Walmart dedicated account."

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

DMV:

Department of Motor Vehicles, Bureau of Motor Vehicles

The state agency that handles everything related to your driver's licences, including testing, issuance, transfers, and revocation.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Marc, the reason I named this site Trucking Truth is because almost everything I found on the Web and everything I heard from truck drivers during my 15 years of driving was BS to some degree, and oftentimes a high degree. I lost count only a few months into my career of the number of times I'd be listening to some trucker stories thinking, "I wonder if he thinks I believe any of this? I wonder if he believes any of this?" But I'd just smile and listen and enjoy it like any good piece of fiction.

Fortunately I no longer have to do that. Unfortunately you're "listening career" is just beginning, and it's off to a great start. Smile big!

Also... I realize "easy" was a bad choice... I know this won't be easy.

People say that, but they don't realize that at all. I've never met anyone who could honestly tell me trucking was easier than they expected. Everyone famously underestimates this career, which is why 75% of the people who make an attempt at it never even get to the point that they're driving solo. At the Paid CDL Training Programs I'm told 50% of the students who show up never even manage to get their CDL!

So you think you're being respectful by telling us you expect this career to be hard, but have no worries. We won't be offended if you think it's going to be easy. From the outside it seems like it would be. In this country the general consensus is that any idiot can drive a truck if they can't do anything worthwhile with their lives, but we don't take offense to that either. That's just public perception.

And all of those "too good to be true" opportunities that ask nothing of a driver but pay big money? They're exactly what they seem - too good to be true. But heck, they make for an exciting story, don't they?

smile.gif

when I asked if they hired new CDL drivers he replied "who doesn't?!?"

Almost no one hires new drivers. You see a ton of advertising about it, but that's all coming from a very tiny percentage of the companies out there. The overwhelming majority can't hire new drivers because their insurance companies won't allow it.

The best thing to do is apply for Truck Driving Jobs everywhere you can, see who offers you an opportunity, and choose the one you feel suits you best.

Definitely take what Old School says about starting your career OTR very seriously. You can't believe how many drivers manage to wiggle their way into a local gig and immediately find they're in over their heads. Many get fired from that first gig, others get lucky and hang on for dear life long enough to figure out how to handle that rig.

I’ve seen the places where JBH drops their loads, you’d soil your drawers if you had to attempt it right now

rofl-3.gif

It's true - this job is way tougher than you think.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

ChefsJK's Comment
member avatar

I will have to chime in here about UPS Parcel salaries because i do talk to a bunch and am friends with a few drivers here in NJ. Yes their top salary is $35/hour here but that differs around the country since each area has different contracts, etc. Starting salary of a 1st year UPS driver is $18/hour, during peak season usually September through January/February every driver makes top rate regardless of new hire, casual driver (hired just for peak season) or regular driver. And their hours per week they can work max goes from 60 hours a week to 70 hours per week during leak season. For hired drivers they get double time pay if they work on Sundays and have one or two triple time days they can use whenever and i think a couple of holidays are also triple time days. So yes it is very possible to make 100k with UPS in a year, they pay your pension and benefits, you just need to take care of your union dues. And they do run teams as well doing cross country stuff running from hub to hub and they also make a very good salary, u dont know many of the details about that side kf it. But like I said what I said above is based on NJ and their contract setup, they pay and everything else will vary from state to state depending in their contracts

Marc Lee's Comment
member avatar

Once again... points taken!

To be clear here... I am NOT chasing "big bucks". I am also aware there is nothing I can do to prepare for the chalenges ahead except to be a sponge and try to learn everything possible. This, if course, includes everything shared by the great resources here. I am truly grateful...

The overwhelming majority can't hire new drivers because their insurance companies won't allow it.

Recruiter specifically mentioned that their insurance company vastly prefers that they hire graduates of the program I am in. Pethaps this is more b.s. but it sounded like most of what you said about this is correct, but then again... I guess that is the best way to sell a lie, right? (In your case...)

Gotta go learn to downshift with a trailer and begin the backing journey!

Safe roads!

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

It might be the company prefers your school over other schools in the area, but i dont believe they would prefer a school graduate over someone with 1 year OTR. bull.

when i came.to prime a friend had started at a local. He told the instructor i was at prime and the guy said "oh thats ome of the worst companies out there" yeah ok. im still here after 3 yrs cause it sucks right? then when i got on the road and drove 400 miles my first day behind a wheel, the instructor told him i was lying. so i screen shot my QC miles to him. Three months later i was in my own truck and he still hadnt test. my friend mentioned that and the guy said "what do you expect, prime is one of the best companies around." sounds like a reliable source lol

and correction to Brett 50% dont make it through orientation! at prime they never make it to the permit phase, let alone get the CDL.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More