Prime New Driver Pay

Topic 23242 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Amy E.'s Comment
member avatar

Hi All,

Been reading the very many helpful contributions to this site. I'm currently considering company paid CDL training and getting conflicting information from the recruiter re: Prime pay for new drivers. According to the Prime website, the amount is 44cpm for new reefer drivers, but the recruiter says that I will be earning 49cpm as a new driver once i get my CDL and finish my 2 months driving with the trainer. At this time i'm only considering Prime based on the reputation of their CDL program, i would just like to have the correct information.

Could someone please confirm/deny/provide more information.

Thanks in advance

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Its 44 cpm for a condo and 49cpm for lightweights. you get an additional 5cpm in the LW if you run northeast to northeast areas. all of thisnisnon the website.

Most new drivers go into the LW once out of training. Although it is not forced, most find it easier to catch up on bills and such before going into a condo later. if you want the condo, you must ask for one and get approval from a supervisor... not a big deal. those with pets, passengers and trainers often get the condos first.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Actually both sets of information are correct. confused.gif

The higher dollar amount is what you receive if you drive a lightweight truck, and the lower pay is what you get if you want a condo.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

0848299001535151035.jpg

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

Not only do you get the extra .05 per mile in the lightweight, but you will get your paid vacation at 85K miles. In the condo it’s at 125K.

Diver Driver's Comment
member avatar

Don't let the lightweight term scare you. I was in a LW for over a year. Yes, it's cramped, but they will take out the front seat for you so you can install a fridge, if you like. The 5 cents a mile really adds up quick. Especially when you start getting your fuel and other bonuses.

After you finish your training, and go in to upgrade, they'll more than likely give you a LW. You can request a condo, but if they don't have one available, and you're adamant about getting a condo, you'll have to pay for your own hotel while you wait.

I was gonna go that route until my fleet manager told me that it would probably be best to just take the LW truck. (Trainers and teams have first dibs) After a year of driving a LW, my girlfriend was gonna come out on the road with me, so I needed to get the condo. It was no problem getting into the condo. I was just reminded about the cut in pay.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

"After you finish your training, and go in to upgrade, they'll more than likely give you a LW. You can request a condo, but if they don't have one available, and you're adamant about getting a condo, you'll have to pay for your own hotel while you wait."

So if you've an extra $1,000 or more you've a choice, otherwise,...........

Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

When I left Springfield a couple weeks ago,......

There was a shortage of trucks.

New lease operator's were waiting days and in some instances a week for a truck (Albiet by their own admission they were being particular)

Trainers with standard transmissions were having issues finding students.

There was an issue with females finding or matching up with trainers, (Again they may have been particular)

Some students weren't going out on PSD but were training on training on The Pad and in Springfield at night

It was my understanding there was some sort of bottleneck in the logistical support and supply system management was feverishly attempting to resolve.

Mainly that suppliers production system was ill prepared for the increase in demand by the surging transportation industry and booming economy.

There's not only an issue (Industry Wide, and not just any one particular carrier) not only a demand for tractor but also trailers, drivers, mechanics, clerical, administrative, managerial and other support personnel.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Dan, planning is a huge ingredient in the formula of success at trucking. Everyday I start out on the road I have a back-up plan or two just in case things don't go as expected. Truck driving requires daily adjustments and reactions to our circumstances. We have a long history of advising and mentoring people in here to do what ever they can to save some money before they jump into the training phase of this career.

You either ignored our admonitions concerning this or determined that your military background qualified you as tough enough to handle whatever trucking could dish out. You won't be the first Marine who got his clock cleaned by underestimating what it takes to make a go of this career. You're obviously unprepared for this Roller Coaster Ride.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Dan S.'s Comment
member avatar

Thanks

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More