Recruiting Tricks

Topic 23254 | Page 1

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Brad C.'s Comment
member avatar

So I’ve been back at doing my due diligence for getting into the industry. There is a video fairly recently released from an informative YouTube channel and a published article that has raised a concern for me. Apparently companies have stooped too getting potential hires to company orientation then dumping them with no reason sometimes leaving them stranded in an unfamiliar city. Has anyone heard about this practice? If so can we get the worst offenders names in the open for the people who must protect themselves falling victim to this practice. I understand there are a whole host of reasons one might get removed form a pool of applicants.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Ignore YouTube videos for the most part as they tend to be full of it. Think of it this way why would a company spend the money to bring someone out to their orientation just to send them home for no reason? For the laughs?? It would just be a waste of thousands of dollars per year and a lot of headaches for no reason.

Their are multiple reasons why people get sent home, usually it is because they hid or didnt disclose something on a application or because of a failed drug test or physical.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Brad, a large percentage of the people you'll come across do not take personal responsibility for the outcome of their endeavors. Just ask them. They never do anything wrong. They never made any mistakes. They did everything perfectly. Yet somehow they never find success at anything and they're always getting screwed by other people or circumstances outside of their control. Amazing how that always seems to be the case with certain people.

In the past you didn't hear much from these people, but nowadays you have the Web where every knucklehead can get on there and tell all the lies they'd like to tell with no repercussions and no fact checking.

There is a video fairly recently released from an informative YouTube channel

Interesting that you used the word "informative". My question is how would you know if it's good information or not? In fact, the reason I named this website Trucking Truth is because I was appalled at how much of the "information" you read about trucking is utter nonsense. A huge percentage of it in fact is blatant lies or misinformation meant to cover up the shortcomings of the people making these statements in the first place.

The Paid CDL Training Programs are run by the largest, most successful companies in the nation. You can be confident they know what they're doing. They're certainly not bringing in people and sending them home for no reason. I'm not sure which concerns me more, the fact that someone would say that or the fact that anyone would believe it. It makes no sense on any level.

This is a performance based business. If you get along well with people and you perform well at your job you'll do awesome. If not, you'll do terrible. That's 90% of what this industry boils down to. There's no faking it. They'll let almost anyone take a shot at it, and most of the people who try just don't have what it takes or aren't willing to do what it takes to thrive in such a demanding industry.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brad C.'s Comment
member avatar

I'm not sure which concerns me more, the fact that someone would say that or the fact that anyone would believe it. It makes no sense on any level.

You are absolutely correct when you say it doesn’t make sense. I say informative because he covers a lot of the same stuff covered here and it pretty well matches up. Had he not referenced an article entitled Bus and dump from Fleet Owner magazine on the same topic I would have dismissed the idea. The fact is I don’t know the credibility of the source and the details are kinda scarce in the article. I have been a member here for a while and have been lurking in the shadows for the most part. I believe if any forum can help shed light on the subject it’s here. Thanks for the enlightening info. It is actually all the resources here that have pushed me to feel comfortable with getting into the industry.

Joseph L.'s Comment
member avatar

I got my CDL A license by attending both CR.ENGLAND and CRST. I watched a lot of YouTube videos on both of them before I went to each school. While most where pretty straight forward unbiased address the good and bad, there where of course the hater videos people ranting about how horrible each company was. I ignored each of them. I approached each school was the same plan A, take it day by day and deal with what ever the day brought.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I read that article and it's total garbage.

What you're seeing is the same thing you see in professional sports. They'll call a penalty on someone and that player will run around screaming and crying like the worst injustice in history has been done. Then you see the replay and realize that not only did he commit a blatant penalty, but he knows full well he did it, and he knows we'll have 10 camera angles of it, and yet none of that stops him from pleading his case and swearing to God and his mother that he did nothing wrong.

These people that are getting sent home from the company programs either blatantly lied on their application or failed their physical or drug test. See, these companies don't do the background checks or drug tests until the person arrives at their facility. That's when the thorough background checks and drug tests get done, and the truth comes out.

The company often won't tell you why you're being sent home for fear of being sued for improper hiring practices. Even if they accidentally give you the wrong reason or say it the wrong way they can be sued for it. So they don't take the chance. They simply say, "We found a better candidate" or "something in your background didn't check out."

Trust me, the trucking industry needs qualified professional drivers. Unfortunately they have to sift through a lot of unqualified or unprofessional applicants to find a few good ones.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I fell for a recruiter truck back in 2014 with Roehl Transport. My recruiter sold me the old...come learn to drive a truck, and we’ll give you a job for about a year. I did it.

You also have to remember the whole process is an interview for employment.

Good luck and don’t coyly to YouTube for your info. Ask these fine gents in this site.

Brad C.'s Comment
member avatar

Mr. Aquila for the win. I’ve gotta say I am impressed with the response. I was thinking in the back of my mind, “Could this be?” Just wanted to touch base and see if there was any validity in the accusations that where made. Unfortunately I have not had the chance to decipher the good(honest) from the bad(misleading at best) in trucking publications. I know no one is perfect but TT has to be the best I’ve found so far. I appreciate everyone’s response and may you all have a great time ahead.

Big Scott's Comment
member avatar

If you want the company to leave you somewhere, just be a total unsafe driver, argue with everything your trainer says, complain about everything you can think of. Whine and complain to the dispatcher. Before long you and your belongings will be in a truck stop making a video about how bad that company did you.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Rarely do the folks that are making it in this industry posting stuff on the net. Why??? They don’t have the time. The screwups have plenty of it, as well as an axe to grind. I once was at an orientation for a large carrier. We were lined up in a hallway for our drug test. A guy in line appeared nervous. He even said he wasn’t sure if he would pass. My question is simply why did he bother showing up. Some folks are just plain dumb.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

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