Prime Training/company Pay Vs Veriha Training/company Pay?

Topic 23333 | Page 1

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:
Luke O.'s Comment
member avatar

I was for the longest time now going to go with Prime. They seem to have the best training and the best positive reviews about training, and more or less mostly positive reviews for their overall pay once solo. But recently Ive been reading up on Veriha, which is a much smaller company. I noticed their tuition is 11,500$ and a 18 month commitment, I assume because they are a newer company? If thats not the case why so expensive?

Anyways my reasoning for considering Veriha is they pay the 600$ a week during training which is a huge bonus to me, as my current finances/****ty wages make it near impossible to save up 4-6weeks worth of savings to cover the first month of prime training, cuz like the rest of us, I got bills to pay.

So my question is, aside from Tts take on veriha and their training, I cant find much info on them. They seem to have a favorable review on indeed and glassdoor, not a bunch of complaints. But their training is wierd and seems like its an accelerated program, which I worry about how well I would do in something like that having no trucking experience whatsoever.

I checked TT training diaries and only found 2 incomplete for Veriha that provided barely any info. Ive checked their website as well and very little info can be found on it either.

Also what does Veriha pay once solo on average? Ive been seeing Prime paychecks net pay once solo anywhere from 900-1200, but veriha claims to pay only 800, and their cpm seems awfully low at .38, and even tho they have a positive rating, most of those ratings say they rarely get raises

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Luke, stop reading the ratings!

It drives us crazy that people keep reading random reviews from random people about these companies. The trucking industry gets a ton of people who take a shot at it but have no business doing so. They either don't have what it takes or aren't willing to do what it takes to thrive in this industry, but they're also unwilling to shoulder the blame for their lack of success so they try to make it look like it was the company that was the problem.

Are you aware of the fact that Veriha was one of the companies awarded "Best Companies To Drive For 2018" - Best Fleets To Drive For 2018

The reason their tuition and commitment is longer is because they're looking for more dedicated people. They're trying to build their in-house training program slowly by being more selective with their students. But If you stay for the 18 month commitment your training will be free. You only have to pay the tuition if you quit the company early and fail to fulfill your end of the bargain.

Here is their pay information:

Company drivers are paid $.35/mile for Regional , $.36/mile for OTR with a guaranteed pay of $800 per week.

If your set schedule starts on a Friday or Saturday you'll earn an additional $.03/mile.

You'll get accessorial pay of $.02/miles on loads less than 400 miles.

You'll also get $.03/mile Congestion Pay on loads less than 400 miles that deliver to a customer in the Northeast and the Chicago area.

They offer a quarterly bonus of up to .03 CPM that is based on miles ran and other key performance indicators rather than just fuel consumption.

You can read more about the company here:

Veriha Trucking Paid CDL Training

Veriha doesn't pay $800/week, they guarantee a minimum of $800/week. If you hustle and work hard you'll make considerably more than that.

So think about this, Luke. Veriha was established in 1978 by John Veriha as a one truck operation. They have grown successfully over the past 40 years and now have several hundred trucks and were awarded as one of the best companies to drive for in the nation this year.

Have you applied to these companies and been accepted already? If not, don't waste your time doing research and Apply For Paid CDL Training. Then see who offers you a position and start talking to their recruiters.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

First off at Prime, after you pass your CDL test, usually about a couple of weeks, they start paying you an advance of $200.00 per week. Then once you start TNT you will be paid at least $700.00 per week. Who told you you needed to save so much? What bills do you have to pay? Many companies will work with you when you explain your plans to them. Very few training companies pay you from day one.

I went through CFI's training while unemployed. They paid for my transportation, food and housing while in training. Then they paid me $100.00 cash for orientation. After that it was out with a trainer earning 26 CPM. They have raised starting pay to 35 CPM.

Choose wisely. Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

TNT:

Trainer-N-Trainee

Prime Inc has their own CDL training program and it's divided into two phases - PSD and TNT.

The PSD (Prime Student Driver) phase is where you'll get your permit and then go on the road for 10,000 miles with a trainer. When you come back you'll get your CDL license and enter the TNT phase.

The TNT phase is the second phase of training where you'll go on the road with an experienced driver for 30,000 miles of team driving. You'll receive 14ยข per mile ($700 per week guaranteed) during this phase. Once you're finished with TNT training you will be assigned a truck to run solo.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Luke O.'s Comment
member avatar

Luke, stop reading the ratings!

It drives us crazy that people keep reading random reviews from random people about these companies. The trucking industry gets a ton of people who take a shot at it but have no business doing so. They either don't have what it takes or aren't willing to do what it takes to thrive in this industry, but they're also unwilling to shoulder the blame for their lack of success so they try to make it look like it was the company that was the problem.

Are you aware of the fact that Veriha was one of the companies awarded "Best Companies To Drive For 2018" - Best Fleets To Drive For 2018

The reason their tuition and commitment is longer is because they're looking for more dedicated people. They're trying to build their in-house training program slowly by being more selective with their students. But If you stay for the 18 month commitment your training will be free. You only have to pay the tuition if you quit the company early and fail to fulfill your end of the bargain.

Here is their pay information:

double-quotes-start.png

Company drivers are paid $.35/mile for Regional , $.36/mile for OTR with a guaranteed pay of $800 per week.

If your set schedule starts on a Friday or Saturday you'll earn an additional $.03/mile.

You'll get accessorial pay of $.02/miles on loads less than 400 miles.

You'll also get $.03/mile Congestion Pay on loads less than 400 miles that deliver to a customer in the Northeast and the Chicago area.

They offer a quarterly bonus of up to .03 CPM that is based on miles ran and other key performance indicators rather than just fuel consumption.

double-quotes-end.png

You can read more about the company here:

Veriha Trucking Paid CDL Training

Veriha doesn't pay $800/week, they guarantee a minimum of $800/week. If you hustle and work hard you'll make considerably more than that.

So think about this, Luke. Veriha was established in 1978 by John Veriha as a one truck operation. They have grown successfully over the past 40 years and now have several hundred trucks and were awarded as one of the best companies to drive for in the nation this year.

Have you applied to these companies and been accepted already? If not, don't waste your time doing research and Apply For Paid CDL Training. Then see who offers you a position and start talking to their recruiters.

Yes I have applied for Paid cdl training using the TT link you listed here, I did that about 3 weeks ago. The only companies who called me were CRST, Roehl, TMC, and Prime. CRST & Roehl said no because I have a rear end accident from spring of 2018, even tho it was a no citation no report accident, it was technically still my fault and I must wait 3 years before theyll consider me again. TMC I havent spoken with yet. Prime I have, and at the moment, from doing my research, it seems Prime, maybe Knight, maybe CRE, and maybe Veriha or TMC would be possible.

My problem is my bills. I cant not do research, I have a family to take care of. I have to know how long I will be going without pay, so I can attempt to plan accordingly. Old School I think it was told me with Prime to bring or have 4-5 weeks of money set aside to cover bills at home before you get paid, and a flatbedder with Prime on another website told me that the 200$ advance they give you on the comdat card, there is no way to call and pay bills with it. This is a major obstacle for me. I was interested in Veriha because according to TT, >>> they pay 600$ a week from day 1. <<<

I HAVE looked at the page you linked, but the info outside of TT is scarce, hence why I asked here. I can not afford to just quit my job and leave for CDL training unless i know exactly what im getting into, what the cons and pros are, what is expected of me, what the pay is like etc. I have to do research. I know that alot of ppl in trucking bash on companies when in reality it was there fault, but reviews are still reviews. Not everyone is like that. Not everyone who has had a bad experience is entirely their fault. Sometimes **** is outside of your control. Its like that with any industry. Im not going to just use TT as my only form of research, Im going to call the company, look at other reviews, google stuff etc, I have to do my research. I can not just take a gamble based off what one website alone says. Keep in mind I also take everything with a grain of salt and know that my own success is for the most part based off how well I apply myself.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Luke, all we do here is try to help people like you make a decent start at this. We have no agenda but the truth. That's why this site is so heavily moderated. We don't allow a bunch of knuckleheads to mouth off with their nonsense. The difference should be obvious to you since you appear to be hitting every site or forum you can.

You are certainly free to spend your time as you please, but we've witnessed people doing what you are doing countless times, and all they accomplish is getting themselves confused, frustrated, and worn out for nothing. That's why Brett suggested you give yourself a break.

If you have to be getting paid immediately you're limiting yourself to just a couple of companies. Personally I think that's a mistake. We've all been through plenty of orientations and we've all seen the people who show up with no plan or money for their bills at home. Those are generally the first ones to go back home. I remember a fellow at one orientation I was at who left just as soon as they were assigning trainers to us. His wife had called him furious about her electricity getting cut off! That's no way to start a safety sensitive career. You need to be really focused on the task at hand.

We've always recommended that you figure out a way to put something aside for a few weeks. Even if you have to sell something that you'd rather not, it will ease your transition and spare you a lot of unneeded stress while trying to adapt to the many changes this career demands. Whatever you sell can be replaced once you start making good money out here.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

So instead of reading 500 reviews from random John Doe's on the Internet, why not approach it from a common sense perspective?

The companies you're considering are all the elite in this nation. They're the largest, most profitable, most successful companies out there that have proven themselves to be the best of the best for decades.

Knowing that, what do you expect to dig up on these companies? Do you think they might have a secret setup with the Feds where they're brainwashing and enslaving drivers? Do you think the fact that they have a long list of awards and a fleet of $120,000 tractors blanketing the nation serving the full spectrum of Fortune 500 corporations is a coverup for a failing operation whose secret agenda is to let you sit in a truck stop and bleed your bank account dry?

Doesn't it seem rather apparent that you're going to be given every opportunity imaginable to succeed at a place like that? Because it always seemed pretty apparent to me.

Like Old School said, you can spend your time anyway you like. Personally, I know better than to listen to anyone who points fingers and places blame for their failures. You said:

I know that alot of ppl in trucking bash on companies when in reality it was there fault, but reviews are still reviews. Not everyone is like that. Not everyone who has had a bad experience is entirely their fault. Sometimes **** is outside of your control.

Bullsh*t. Don't tell me people are failing in trucking for reasons beyond their control. If you think that's the case then give me one example of a situation where someone who was perfect willing and able to be a Top Tier Driver failed at trucking and it wasn't their fault. Give me a hypothetical situation where that might happen.

Personally I don't go for any of that baloney at all. I don't believe in playing the blame game or the "poor me" card. The problem in trucking for some people is that there's no faking it. You're simply not going to survive out there for long if you're not capable of putting in a ton of hard work, thinking independently, being consistently safe, and making smart decisions. If you're a knucklehead it's going to show in your performance in a hurry. If you're capable of doing this job it'll show in your performance in a hurry.

You either get out there and figure out how to survive in this industry or you fail. Several of our Moderators had a living nightmare for a trainer and they still made it through the training just fine and went on to be superstar drivers.

It doesn't matter which of the major carriers you work for. There's no such thing as a major carrier that you should avoid. You should definitely try to pick the one that suits your preferences well for home time and the type of freight you want to haul, but beyond that you're just wasting your time listening to people cry on YouTube or blame their companies for their failures in the other forums.

If you want to succeed at this then the best thing you can do is listen to this:

Podcast Episode 18: Stop The Fear And Doubt, Focus On Your Own Success

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Big Scott (CFI Driver and's Comment
member avatar

I highly recommend research, research, research. I believe most people who jump into trucking wash out because they didn't know what to expect. If you have young kids at home, expect to miss just about everything for that critical one year. This lifestyle is not for everyone. It took me about one month with CFI before I started getting paid. I was on unemployment which ended as I was finishing up school. Because, I didn't have to pay for food, transportation and a hotel, it was easier on me. Good luck.

Luke O.'s Comment
member avatar

So instead of reading 500 reviews from random John Doe's on the Internet, why not approach it from a common sense perspective?

The companies you're considering are all the elite in this nation. They're the largest, most profitable, most successful companies out there that have proven themselves to be the best of the best for decades.

Knowing that, what do you expect to dig up on these companies? Do you think they might have a secret setup with the Feds where they're brainwashing and enslaving drivers? Do you think the fact that they have a long list of awards and a fleet of $120,000 tractors blanketing the nation serving the full spectrum of Fortune 500 corporations is a coverup for a failing operation whose secret agenda is to let you sit in a truck stop and bleed your bank account dry?

Doesn't it seem rather apparent that you're going to be given every opportunity imaginable to succeed at a place like that? Because it always seemed pretty apparent to me.

Like Old School said, you can spend your time anyway you like. Personally, I know better than to listen to anyone who points fingers and places blame for their failures. You said:

double-quotes-start.png

I know that alot of ppl in trucking bash on companies when in reality it was there fault, but reviews are still reviews. Not everyone is like that. Not everyone who has had a bad experience is entirely their fault. Sometimes **** is outside of your control.

double-quotes-end.png

Bullsh*t. Don't tell me people are failing in trucking for reasons beyond their control. If you think that's the case then give me one example of a situation where someone who was perfect willing and able to be a Top Tier Driver failed at trucking and it wasn't their fault. Give me a hypothetical situation where that might happen.

Personally I don't go for any of that baloney at all. I don't believe in playing the blame game or the "poor me" card. The problem in trucking for some people is that there's no faking it. You're simply not going to survive out there for long if you're not capable of putting in a ton of hard work, thinking independently, being consistently safe, and making smart decisions. If you're a knucklehead it's going to show in your performance in a hurry. If you're capable of doing this job it'll show in your performance in a hurry.

You either get out there and figure out how to survive in this industry or you fail. Several of our Moderators had a living nightmare for a trainer and they still made it through the training just fine and went on to be superstar drivers.

It doesn't matter which of the major carriers you work for. There's no such thing as a major carrier that you should avoid. You should definitely try to pick the one that suits your preferences well for home time and the type of freight you want to haul, but beyond that you're just wasting your time listening to people cry on YouTube or blame their companies for their failures in the other forums.

If you want to succeed at this then the best thing you can do is listen to this:

Podcast Episode 18: Stop The Fear And Doubt, Focus On Your Own Success

I dont know a whole lot about trucking just yet because I havent been out there yet, and I do respect the veteran drivers, but there are some situations out there, beyond your control, where **** can go wrong. Such as Idk, a tire blew out, they were late, and their dispatch got mad, customer got mad etc. A few months down the road, for some reason tire blows out again. Why? who knows, maybe they hit an unseen road hazard. Maybe its a newbie, guy has had 2 simple unlucky scenarios that caused them to be late. **** happens. Maybe that dispatch is having a bad day, maybe someone is breathing down their neck, and they tell the guy to take better care of his tires, or get lost idk. All i know is **** happens.

I dont give a flying **** if youre trucking or bagging groceries, **** happens in every job, and just because youve never had it happen to you, doesnt mean it doesnt happen. But idk you, or what youve been through. I have nothing wrong with owning up to mistakes, etc, making critical decisions etc, but reviews exist for a reason. Not every ****ing negative review is the drivers fault. Is it the norm? certainly, but not 110%. Just the same as not every news story is "fake news".

Ive read countless articles here, as well as other sites. I get it, no one likes a super trucker, and everyone needs to own their own actions, but Im sorry, you are blowing smoke if you truly think anyone and everyone has never been fired for something outside their control. I came to TT looking for answers, and while Ive gotten it, the whole "im a righteous trucker i dont take no bs" vibe I get from some of the folks here, is just as bad as the "im a super trucker vibe" ive gotten from other folks. You want to help people? help em,but for god sake, the bs runs rampant here too

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar
but for god sake, the bs runs rampant here too

Oh does it? Ok then. So a guy who hasn't even stepped into a classroom yet is calling out veteran drivers that have been in the industry for years, claiming we're full of BS? Well you won't have to worry about this guy wasting any more of his time on you. You go figure it out for yourself hero.

Mike D.'s Comment
member avatar

When I seen on the business channels that there is a huge shortage of truck drivers, I started looking into it online as well as was over whelmed by all the noise. I feel very blessed to have found this site with such a wealth of knowledge for free. Keep up the great work Trucking Truth. You do provide a very valuable service.

Page 1 of 3 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More