Economic Downturns

Topic 23611 | Page 2

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Brian's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it differs by area but the ltl's out here in Chicago that are union. Unfortunately it's not going to matter what kind of driver you are it's all seniority. Where ever you are on the list. If it's slow you're either waiting at home for a load or working the dock. Great benefits sure but that was a big no for me. Company like Swift heck yes stable year round, ltl not so much.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Maybe it differs by area but the ltl's out here in Chicago that are union. Unfortunately it's not going to matter what kind of driver you are it's all seniority. Where ever you are on the list. If it's slow you're either waiting at home for a load or working the dock. Great benefits sure but that was a big no for me. Company like Swift heck yes stable year round, ltl not so much.

Roadway and YRC are both union shops, same work rules. My two friends carried over their seniority from RW to the YRC merged companies. So in part I agree with you, however if a driver for one of those companies is laid-off, once the freight rebounds they call you back. During that period of time, if you want to drive for another company, it will not be that difficult to find viable employment as a driver.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

We are coming up on the slow time at Old Dominion they don't lay anyone off but they may call and tell you there is no work which I have had a few times. They do call people off by seniority so being near the bottom and extra board I'll be one of the first called off, but if it is slow the next day I'll get to work and next guy up the list is called off and so on. They try not to call you off more than once a week. Plus you always have to option to use a PTO day if you want to get paid.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

I run reefer..everyone eats so i drive.

im not worried. and although i have heard drivers say "freight is slow" i have never been without a load or preplan, so not familiar.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Somehow this conversation got pushed over into the LTL sector, which really doesn't help the OP with his original question.

I'm just going to say I've been an OTR driver for about six years. I can recall one single day that I sat idle due to a slow down in the economy. I've sat occasionally for other reasons, but not specifically due to a sluggish economy. The freight business has a lot of if dynamics that keep it going during all kinds of situations that may be affecting other sectors of the economy.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Pupil2Prodigy's Comment
member avatar

Thx

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

And heres another tidbit... many drivers claim they sit on holidays... i dont. if i can deliver i at least have a load that im in transit with. but i habe delivered all but christmas

Daniel (Turtle)'s Comment
member avatar

As an OTR I made my personal best miles and money during Dec.. But you have to be willing to be out there.. I ran a 4200 mile week many times between Christmas and New Years.. There is freight if you are willing to be out.. The issue is many OTR wants to be home, especially during that week.. Factories and companies are closed during that week, and slowed down leading up to it.. But there are ones out there still needing to get things from point A to B if you want to work.. Especially if you plan good.. I personally like to pick up a load day before Christmas that goes cross 1500+ miles and delivers day after or so.. No traffic, good miles and Customers are there and easy to get unloaded..

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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