Local Job For Newbie

Topic 23709 | Page 1

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Brac's Comment
member avatar

Hi, I was wondering if anybody out there knows of some good local companies in the Northern Illinois area that hires new drivers. I have talked with Schneider, but my wife and I would be happier if I could start off my career while remaining at home. I realize that’s not always an option for the new driver, but I thought I would check. Thanks.

Dave Reid's Comment
member avatar

Most drivers will recommend that you not consider local work without at least a year experience. Local usually involves a lot of deliveries in difficult places and constant difficult traffic. Most carriers won't hire new drivers for such work since they know it isn't likely to work out.

Schneider, among others, can likely offer a regional gig that could get you through home often in your area.

If you insist on local work right off the bat, you might try the food delivery outfits. Some of them are so desperate to fill their lousy jobs that they'll try to train a newbie.

Hi, I was wondering if anybody out there knows of some good local companies in the Northern Illinois area that hires new drivers. I have talked with Schneider, but my wife and I would be happier if I could start off my career while remaining at home. I realize that’s not always an option for the new driver, but I thought I would check. Thanks.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

If you are near the Chicagoland area YRC has been hiring like crazy. Check out some of the other ltl's also like Old Dominion. That will be your best bet for local.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

If you are near the Chicagoland area YRC has been hiring like crazy. Check out some of the other ltl's also like Old Dominion. That will be your best bet for local.

As long as it’s line haul and not Pick-up and Delivery (P&D). Even pulling a pup, P&D is arguably one of the toughest assignments for an entry level driver.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

Line Haul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

Where in Northern Illinois? Old Dominion might hire you for linehaul right out of a approved school. Most LTLs are hiring student drivers these days as mentioned above.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Brac's Comment
member avatar

Thanks everybody! I am in McHenry County. I think I kind of knew what the popular response would be. I know I need further training and would benefit from a company like Schneider. I was just checking Incase someone out there knew a local company where I could get good experience while having daily home time. Suppose I wanted to have my cake and eat it too. Thanks again everybody.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
Suppose I wanted to have my cake and eat it too.

Hello Lawrence!

I just have to throw my thoughts in here. I've never been a fan of starting this career as a local driver. I was blessed to have a very influential set of Grandparents in my upbringing and I have never forgotten a subtle message my Grandfather taught me while I was still just a kid. We were camping and he was starting a campfire for us in the evening. He started with some of the easiest pieces of tinder to ignite. He slowly and gradually added the more difficult pieces that would eventually become an effective fire that would provide warmth, satisfaction, and the ability to cook our meals. All during the process he explained to me that this is the proper method and approach to success in life's endeavors.

He could have started that fire differently, and he may or may not have eventually ended up with the same result. By taking a shortcut he knew that not only would it be a more frustrating way to get started, but he might not even get it to work after all. By taking incremental steps to get to his desired result, he assured his ultimate success.

I don't think this is a matter of "having your cake and eating it too." It's more like wanting to eat your cake so fast that you choke on it. This career requires prudence and a careful approach if you want to succeed. Have you considered the disturbing statistics of the amount of people who made failed attempts at trucking? They are scary. People go into this field thinking that driving is easy - any average person ought to be able to do that successfully. Yet there are plenty of driving jobs available offering really great pay that go unfilled.

Most newbies get started under false impressions and very few of them are able to stay the course. They either get themselves in trouble early on so that they get fired, or they just realize they are in way over their heads and end up quitting. It is highly unusual for people to start off with the more difficult trucking jobs and become successful in their career. It can be done, and I've even seen a very small number of people who did it that way. I don't recommend it.

If you'd like to see some further clarification of my thoughts on this, then please read this article on Why You Should Not Start Your Trucking Career As A Local Driver.

Brian's Comment
member avatar

For some people like myself it was either find a local driving job or not drive at all, no in between. Which was why after driving with Schneider for 3 months I didnt drive again for almost 3 years. So everything I had learned was exactly fresh when I was able to find one. Local companies today need drivers just as bad as otr companies and are adapting to that. Some of the big name ltl's like Yrc for example will give you 8 weeks of training if you don't have a cdl , and 4 weeks if you do. That's about equal to some otr companies, and you still have to test out to get on the road.

If you were a good, safe driver before you started driving a truck. That is going to translate. If you were the opposite who made poor decisions that will translate. If we took some drivers like old school, flipped the script and had them start local instead I'm confident nothing would change. They would still be the great driver they are today.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Daniel B.'s Comment
member avatar

For some people like myself it was either find a local driving job or not drive at all, no in between. Which was why after driving with Schneider for 3 months I didnt drive again for almost 3 years. So everything I had learned was exactly fresh when I was able to find one. Local companies today need drivers just as bad as otr companies and are adapting to that. Some of the big name ltl's like Yrc for example will give you 8 weeks of training if you don't have a cdl , and 4 weeks if you do. That's about equal to some otr companies, and you still have to test out to get on the road.

If you were a good, safe driver before you started driving a truck. That is going to translate. If you were the opposite who made poor decisions that will translate. If we took some drivers like old school, flipped the script and had them start local instead I'm confident nothing would change. They would still be the great driver they are today.

I do local P&D. I would love to see rookie Old School try to do my route - or any other rookie. It would result in a backing accident or hitting a pole within the first day guaranteed.

48' trailer with a liftgate swerving left and right on small roads avoiding power lines and backing up into narrow driveways from a busy street with the speed limit of 45mph. That's the summary of my typical day in a nutshell.

Not a smart way to start your career.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

LTL:

Less Than Truckload

Refers to carriers that make a lot of smaller pickups and deliveries for multiple customers as opposed to hauling one big load of freight for one customer. This type of hauling is normally done by companies with terminals scattered throughout the country where freight is sorted before being moved on to its destination.

LTL carriers include:

  • FedEx Freight
  • Con-way
  • YRC Freight
  • UPS
  • Old Dominion
  • Estes
  • Yellow-Roadway
  • ABF Freight
  • R+L Carrier

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

P&D:

Pickup & Delivery

Local drivers that stay around their area, usually within 100 mile radius of a terminal, picking up and delivering loads.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers for instance will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Brian believes:

If we took some drivers like old school, flipped the script and had them start local instead I'm confident nothing would change. They would still be the great driver they are today.

100% disagree with this on several fronts. Eventually yes, but out of the gate, heck no.

I recall how difficult my transition was from 3 months of OTR to Walmart Dedicated Grocery delivery. Many similarities to local operation; multiple live-unload stops (up to 6), urban traffic, tight maneuvering and backing situations. Far more difficult for a rookie and will tax every soft and hard skill.

Did you read what Old School wrote before your reply? We have seen many counts of newbies going local who quickly realize just how far over their head they are. If by some chance Brian, you have managed not to hit everything and make it back to your terminal legally, you are the exception and frankly had lady-luck on your side.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

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