Starting Orientation

Topic 23799 | Page 1

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Brian H.'s Comment
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So I have a question that I'm embarrassed to ask but I'm starting orientation then training with my trainer for 3 weeks. How much clothes should I bring I don't want to over pack but I also don't want to under pack. When I was in military I would fill my duffle bag and I was good. But I just need some input on any items I should bring and how much. I know my personal hygiene stuff and shower shoes but that's all I know. I'm lost in the rest. Any input will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance. Be safe.

Ernie S. (AKA Old Salty D's Comment
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If you search for "items to take to orientation", you will find a whole list of responses to this question.

Ernie

andhe78's Comment
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A little of this is also going to depend on if you are going flatbed or dryvan.

Dryvan:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.
Old School's Comment
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No reason to be embarrassed. Here's some general information that should help...

Items To Bring To Orientation And Training

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Brian H.'s Comment
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Thank you for the input. I really appreciate it. I believe I'm going flat bed with Western Express

Michael B.'s Comment
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I think while you are on your trainers truck it is best to underpack! You wont be on it long and everything you bring with you is both weight and volume. All that volume is sleeping on your bunk with you cause theres no place to put it. 3-4 changes of clothes is plenty plus coat, bedding and toiletries. You dont even need a towel cause the showers are provided with towel and washrag. The trainer will generally have the everyday items needed for life on the road and usually willing to help you out. If you desperately need something you can always pick it up at a walmart/truck stop. Once you get your own truck go ahead and stock it like you want it. One duffel bag and a backpack to take in to shower is fine. Tidepods and quarters. Any liquids you bring (shampoo, bodywash, tidepods etc.) I recommend you ziplock baggie them in case of leakage. Good luck and be safe!!!

Splitter's Comment
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I think while you are on your trainers truck it is best to underpack! You wont be on it long and everything you bring with you is both weight and volume. All that volume is sleeping on your bunk with you cause theres no place to put it. 3-4 changes of clothes is plenty plus coat, bedding and toiletries. You dont even need a towel cause the showers are provided with towel and washrag. The trainer will generally have the everyday items needed for life on the road and usually willing to help you out. If you desperately need something you can always pick it up at a walmart/truck stop. Once you get your own truck go ahead and stock it like you want it. One duffel bag and a backpack to take in to shower is fine. Tidepods and quarters. Any liquids you bring (shampoo, bodywash, tidepods etc.) I recommend you ziplock baggie them in case of leakage. Good luck and be safe!!!

I’d still pack a towel for two reasons.

1) Some of the towels, I was left to use, stunk. Just plain nasty.

2) The rest areas in OH have free showers but no towels.

If you get a trainer like my PSD trainer? Then you’ll need more than 3-4 days of clothes. I had a duffle bag with wheels in my bunk with 2-3 weeks of clothes. Let’s just say that he wasn’t the most hygienic trainer but I’ve heard of worse. I’m only 5’ 7” so it didn’t get in my way at the end of my bunk.

In terms of boots, since it’s winter, I’d consider a pair of waterproof & insulated boots. I just got a pair of Merrell’s & they get the job done. I’d also consider rain gear. I got a frog togg’s set for $15-$20 at Walmart . Used it countless times.

Ziplocks for liquids is absolutely mandatory. Learned it the hard way. The pressure from elevation changes pushed out half a bottle of shampoo.

Good luck with your training!

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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All that volume is sleeping on your bunk with you cause theres no place to put it. 3-4 changes of clothes is plenty plus coat, bedding and toiletries.

Couldn't you put your duffle bag on the passenger seat when you are in the bunk?

andhe78's Comment
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double-quotes-start.png

All that volume is sleeping on your bunk with you cause theres no place to put it. 3-4 changes of clothes is plenty plus coat, bedding and toiletries.

double-quotes-end.png

Couldn't you put your duffle bag on the passenger seat when you are in the bunk?

That’s what I did.

The one thing that I regretted not bringing, especially this time of year with flatbed is a headlamp. You are probably going to working in the dark now and then, nice to have both hands free.

Michael B.'s Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

All that volume is sleeping on your bunk with you cause theres no place to put it. 3-4 changes of clothes is plenty plus coat, bedding and toiletries.

double-quotes-end.png

Couldn't you put your duffle bag on the passenger seat when you are in the bunk?

Yes you could put it on the passenger seat but I have seen some take 3-4 bags including hardside luggage to get on their trainers truck. Thats a lot of moving back and forth. Even with one or two bags its still a lot of moving back and forth when you wont use that much stuff anyways.

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