Does The Company Matter

Topic 23824 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Jerry D.'s Comment
member avatar

So ive been researching companies that offer CDL training. This is what I know so far. You will find people who absolutely love a company and people who hate that same company. Every company has their own perks. So my question is does the company really matter or is it solely on the person?And when did you know You were in the right line of work? Ive spent a lot of time on a truck with family and love being on the road. But I'm scared of driving a big truck. I'm not at all comfortable with the size. Is that a bad thing or did any of y'all start out scared of the size. Thanks

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

The short answer? Not really. My guess you are fixated on all the horror stories and not what really matters. Things like hiring area, type of freight, regional vs. coast-to-coast and if a company offers Paid CDL Training Programs are much more important.

Are you conducting your research on the Web of Lies and Misinformation? Unless you are getting your information from Trucking Truth or a Company’s Website, you might as well be reading the tabloids in the grocery check-out line. Head-trash. A waste of time and energy!

Once you finish reading the above link, shift your focus to this one:

Truthful Trucking Company Reviews

So here is the scoop Jerry; good drivers, top performers that understand how-to keep their truck moving safely and efficiently, can be successful anywhere. The name of the driver is far more important than the company name applied to the door of your truck.

There are numerous really good articles found in the Trucking Truth Blog Menu, including the secrets to success, first year challenges and what to avoid. Most if not all of your concerns can be addressed by focusing your research on reading content created by experienced, professional truckers who actually care and want you to succeed.

One of the more recent articles written by Rainy is an excellent place to start:

Why Some Drivers are Treated Better Than Others

Hopefully this information will get you rerouted in the right direction.

Good luck.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Jerry D.'s Comment
member avatar

No after a day of reading 90 percent horror reviews on the web I decided to go straight the drivers. Ive read diaries on here and other forums. From what I can tell certain people willfind food at every company a certain will only find the bad. Is it normal to be scared of the size of the truck

G-Town's Comment
member avatar
Is it normal to be scared of the size of the truck?

Yes, to some extent. Everyone is different. A healthy respect is reasonable. Much of the fear is about uncertainty and doubt. You’ve never experienced this and the mass can be intimidating.

Once in the cab...you’re level of fear should gradually go away.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

What is hysterical is that almost all of the negative reviews of training companies are new drivers who either went lease out of training and were too stupid to know they were in over their head "i lost my house, my wife, and all my savings. im living in my car" ...or they are just too lazy to want to work.

uh, stupid. if you are that much in the hole every week GET OUT of the darn lease!!! i can read these reviews now and pick out the lease ops even when they dont mention it. the others are often written by people who want money thrown at them despite them not having had proved themselves safe or productive.

im so done with the negativity. thats why i try to write realistic and encouraging blog articles.

Heres one of my favorites, and as time goes on, its even more true.

Im Not Just a Number At My Mega Carrier

Jerry D.'s Comment
member avatar

It took me a day of nothing but negative reviews to see that. People tend to blame others for failure. Started on company facebook page and would ask current drives who had left reviews. Most drivers are straight they told me the good and bad about the company. No company is perfect

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

It took me a day of nothing but negative reviews to see that. People tend to blame others for failure. Started on company facebook page and would ask current drives who had left reviews. Most drivers are straight they told me the good and bad about the company. No company is perfect

Jerry I wish everyone understood what was obvious to you. Saved yourself a ton of ag.

Jamie's Comment
member avatar

When I decided to go with Schneider, I did what most people does. I researched companies and seen countless negative reviews. But I worked as a taxi driver before I came to Schneider and my company had a deal to pickup their drivers, so I had a chance to talk to hundreds of drivers and I always made small talk with them and ask questions when they felt like answering them. That's basically why I came to Schneider, since I liked what I heard and it wasn't all good of course.

I remember this one time I picked up two guys who failed a drug test and was being sent home, so of course they was going on about sueing them and the list goes on, I didn't say much to avoid any problems. But they got failed for their own fault.

Another guy was also sent him due to failing a drug test, and be kept going on about it and also mentioned sueing them for wrongful termination since he said he got tested while during his 34 hour reset or home time, I don't remember the exact reason.

But this post is regarding to a lot of the negative reviews online, it's almost always related to the driver failing then the company bring terrible. Now not every negative review is due to their own faults. Some people do have bad experiences due to one reason or another. But that doesn't mean the whole company is terrible over one bad experience. That's my opinion anyways.

Big Scott (CFI Driver/Tra's Comment
member avatar

Here is an example, I went to CFI because a friend was there and said he loved them. I'm thrilled with my choice. I have zero complaints. However, I can go into Joplin and hear drivers complain about the company. This is a career where it is up to the individual to prove themselves. You can be the guy that takes every load with enthusiasm or the one that complains about everything.

As far as fear of the size of the truck, that comes in many forms. Today, I was on a twisty, windy, narrow road with one lane in each direction. I just went slow and was hyper alert. Not a road I would want to do in the dark. Experience breeds comfort in a good way.

Look at these. They will give you ideas on what to look for in a company. For me it was home time policy and speed of training.

Good luck.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

You know what is funny too...when people see i work for prime, they say "oh i would never work for.them. Ive heard stories". then i tell them all the stories from a positive perspective. like how they flew my friend home when his wife was in a life and death car accident, paid for the flight and sent a team to go get his truck without a penalty. they simply said "good luck and keep us posted" Or how when i needed my surgey and things went goofey, getting me to the terminal for the doctor was done immediately. My FMLA forms and disability insurance was all handled by them...no calling and harrassing, no tons of papers.

Plus i show them the terminal videos and find out they are driving some old sucky truck instead of a bright shiny new one. before you know it...im recruiting them lol

people in general suck...and complainers will suck at any company.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More