Want To Leave Western Express For Srt

Topic 23910 | Page 2

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Jamie's Comment
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Its true you can look it up they had a law suit against them for not paying there drivers

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OMG

Waiting for G-Town to hit him with the facts. shocked.png

Maybe he didn't send his paper work in? I heard some companies won't pay you until you do, for obvious reasons. Schneider isn't that way, although I send my paper work in either the same day or the next.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Low miles can often be an availability and time managment issue. If you are given a drop and hook delivery with 2 days on it but you could have dropoed it early and didnt run hard to do that, then you are preventing them from increasing your miles. if you take longer breaks than your 10 hrs you could be getting less miles. These situations are a time managment and availibity issue.

call customers to drop early, take breaks at the customer to increase your availiabity, limit your breaks to 10 hours. Ask dispatch for loads when you are available instead if waiting hours for a load.

unless i am in the shop, i am.always preplanned.

i agree with the guys here, the company is less important than your actions.

when you say swift didnt pay you, do you mean bonuse? raises? what. cause i never hears of swift not paying

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

G-Town's Comment
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Silver I don’t have time to comprehensively respond to this right now.

Suffice it to say you have no clue to the basis of that lawsuit and what it really means to the entire industry, not just Swift.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Low miles can often be an availability and time managment issue. If you are given a drop and hook delivery with 2 days on it but you could have dropoed it early and didnt run hard to do that, then you are preventing them from increasing your miles. if you take longer breaks than your 10 hrs you could be getting less miles. These situations are a time managment and availibity issue.

call customers to drop early, take breaks at the customer to increase your availiabity, limit your breaks to 10 hours. Ask dispatch for loads when you are available instead if waiting hours for a load.

unless i am in the shop, i am.always preplanned.

i agree with the guys here, the company is less important than your actions.

when you say swift didnt pay you, do you mean bonuse? raises? what. cause i never hears of swift not paying

Zip code mileage vs actual.

Drop And Hook:

Drop and hook means the driver will drop one trailer and hook to another one.

In order to speed up the pickup and delivery process a driver may be instructed to drop their empty trailer and hook to one that is already loaded, or drop their loaded trailer and hook to one that is already empty. That way the driver will not have to wait for a trailer to be loaded or unloaded.

Silver .'s Comment
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Im just saying out of my experience and why i left swift i even had a lawyer send me a letter about partaking the law suit

Silver .'s Comment
member avatar

I just read articles old school sent me and wanna say thank you i have been a really hard worker put my 110 percent never refuse any loads always get in on time i even asked to go otr from regional but ca base dont do otr so the positive i try to put out i keep running into brick walls

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Silver, now you've either added new reasons, or changed your reasons, for wanting to leave Western Express. It's hard to help you when the story line keeps changing. Here's the best advice I can give: Stick with Western Express for one year. You owe that to yourself. You need to establish some kind of a record so your next employer can have a little confidence when hiring you. Nobody wants to take a driver who's constantly jumping ship, for whatever reason. You've got plenty of time to see those other states. Patience, my friend - you'll get there. Slow and steady wins this race.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

By the way... I got a letter from an attorney trying to get me to join a class action lawsuit against Western Express for not allowing their drivers to earn minimum wage. I laughed heartily as I pitched it in the trash. I don't know any minimum wage laborers who make fifty grand!

Silver, those lawsuits are for the attorneys only. They scrape together the worst employees they can find, take advantage of them as witnesses and court exhibits, and then make off with whatever the company agrees to settle on so they don't have to go to the expense of a lengthy court battle. It's all nonsense - the drivers get less than nothing.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Silver, now you've either added new reasons, or changed your reasons, for wanting to leave Western Express. It's hard to help you when the story line keeps changing. Here's the best advice I can give: Stick with Western Express for one year. You owe that to yourself. You need to establish some kind of a record so your next employer can have a little confidence when hiring you. Nobody wants to take a driver who's constantly jumping ship, for whatever reason. You've got plenty of time to see those other states. Patience, my friend - you'll get there. Slow and steady wins this race.

Good advice. If you keep hopping, pretty soon no one will want to hire you. Concentrate on making yourself available as soon as possible, and strive to be a top performer, as the previous posters have said. Read the articles quoted, the processes in them have helped many before you, in the same companies.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Ah, i see G Town says it is zipcode to zip code vs actual miles. That means you were getting paid as per company policy but it is not for every mile driven. Only a few companies i know of pay actual miles.

My company has lawsuits against it too, for discrimination against women. somehow i make a great living and get everything i want despite being a woman.

If your problem with the company is its policy, why did you not ask when getting hired? Same goes for WE. Did you not know about the regional from Cali when you got hired? You cant drive from CA to WY in one drive shift so the miles seem to still be there.

id ask dispatch how i could get more miles.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

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