Want To Leave Western Express For Srt

Topic 23910 | Page 1

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:
Silver .'s Comment
member avatar

I have been with western for 5 months and i am not very happy i dont get many miles and only get 30 cpm really want to get with srt but dont know how they treat there drivers and im wanting to know if i do leave before my full year if it will hurt me

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Tim F.'s Comment
member avatar

I have been with western for 5 months and i am not very happy i dont get many miles and only get 30 cpm really want to get with srt but dont know how they treat there drivers and im wanting to know if i do leave before my full year if it will hurt me

I think you should stick it out with Western Express. It’s only been 5 months. Question: your previous post here indicate you were at Swift, what happened??

You need to establish yourself as a producer at some point. I’m my opinion 5 months isn’t long enough. You should be honest and tell people in the forum that this is your third company and now you want SRT to be your fourth

Good luck!!

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

I have been with western for 5 months and i am not very happy i dont get many miles and only get 30 cpm really want to get with srt but dont know how they treat there drivers and im wanting to know if i do leave before my full year if it will hurt me

The real question is why aren't you getting miles? I know WE has miles to run, I see them everywhere. Have you talked to your dispatcher and asked why you aren't getting miles? Are you being offered runs and turning them down? Are you late at shippers/receivers? What is really going on?

If you want to be productive, you are going to have to be honest with yourself about why you aren't getting loads.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

There's a lot more going on here than this driver is letting on. A little over two years ago you were with CRST. A little less than two years ago you said you were with Swift. Now you've only been at Western Express a short time and you're not getting any miles.

What this tells me is that you're not getting the job done out there. You're jumping from company to company and still after all this time you can't figure out how to get miles and you want to jump companies again.

Getting good miles and great treatment from any company starts with driver performance. You have to make every single one of your appointments on time, you have to communicate well with dispatch, and you have to try to get some loads delivered or picked up early to squeeze more miles into each week.

Your problem isn't the company you're working for. Your problems are of your own doing at this point. We have drivers here that have had fantastic success with each of the companies you've worked for. So it's not the companies that are the problem.

There isn't a company in America you can go to to get great miles and great treatment if you're not performing at a high level. Read these two articles to pick up some tips on performing at a high level:

What It Takes To Be A Top Tier Driver

Top Tier Truck Drivers Operate Like Great Business Owners

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Silver, this concern of yours about how the various companies treat their drivers is what's hurting you. It's defining your approach to this whole career. Apparently you didn't do well at Swift, and now your saying you "dont get many miles and only get 30 cpm" at Western Express. You are looking for the trucking company to treat you in such a way that you will do well and make good money. It's completely the wrong approach. It's a very common approach and I understand how you could develop that mentality. After all, 98% of the other truckers you come in contact with have that same attitude.

For anyone in Silver's situation, you need to ask yourself, "Why am I not turning good miles?" The answer cannot be that the company sucks. These companies are in business to make money - that's their number one objective. If they aren't making money, they will have to close up and die. So, you have to come to terms with some critical facts. They make money by moving freight, and they need to move a lot of it because the profit margins in trucking are very slim. That means they have drivers who are turning some big miles. The question of why I'm not one of them has to be answered.

I started my career at Western Express, and they ran me like crazy. Silver, you're getting three cents per mile more than I started with at Western, and yet I managed to make about 50,000 dollars my rookie year. Many of the drivers I met while there, had similar complaints to yours. But almost everytime I'd engage them in a conversation, I'd discover that same approach you have taken. They considered the company as a bad place to work. They looked at it as a place to get started, and then move on. Thay thought they were guilty of just hiring new drivers, paying them peanuts, and then hoping they'd move on once they got some experience. That way they could keep hiring new people that would work cheap.

Now, I've discovered that same outlook by my fellow drivers in my current company. It's everywhere, and it's hurting the drivers. Not only that, it's a completely bogus concept, construed by the people who never can figure out how to succeed as drivers. The way to break out of it is to start ignoring all the negative comments from other drivers. As a rookie, I kept myself away from other drivers whenever I could. I focused on learning to manage my own truck and my hours in a way that allowed me to be productive. I learned to empty myself out early and make sure my dispatcher knew I would be ready to roll once I was empty. I communicated everything on my Qualcomm with accurate ETA's and any pertinent information they would need to keep me moving. I kept to that practice until they realized I meant what I said.

Once they knew I was going to always keep my word, my world changed. I could barely keep up with what they expected of me. You have got to remove any doubt your dispatcher has in their mind about your ability to pull through in a pinch. That lingering doubt will cause you to get overlooked when it comes to load assignments. Do you realize that your dispatcher's pay is based on how productive his drivers are? At Western, that's how it works. Your dispatcher needs you to be turning big miles. There's some reason you're not getting those miles.

I want you to take some time and read these articles. Read them carefully, trying to understand the concepts portrayed in them. See if they trigger anything in you that helps you realize what you could be doing that hinders your success. I wrote them based on the things I learned while working at Western Express.

What It Takes To Be A Top Tier Driver

Can You Hang With The Big Dogs?

One Out Of Five Drivers Does A Good Job

Do I Have What It Takes?

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

CPM:

Cents Per Mile

Drivers are often paid by the mile and it's given in cents per mile, or cpm.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
G-Town's Comment
member avatar

...really want to get with srt but dont know how they treat there drivers and im wanting to know if i do leave before my full year if it will hurt me

quote> SRT will treat you the same exact way as Western, Swift, Schneider, yadda, yadda, yadda.

As Old School and Brett suggested the approach to your job needs to change. Focus on what it takes to be a top performer and adjust your outward focus on what the company isn’t doing, to focusing on what you need to-do better.

Reread all that has been written here...and above all else make it work at Western Express.

Silver .'s Comment
member avatar

Ok to give some insight of my history the reason i left swift was because they were not paying me at all and now my problem with western is im based from ca which has the short end of the stick of the company they only do regional which the furthest they go is Wyoming i even asked to do a texas run and was told they don't go that far

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Ok to give some insight of my history the reason i left swift was because they were not paying me at all and now my problem with western is im based from ca which has the short end of the stick of the company they only do regional which the furthest they go is Wyoming i even asked to do a texas run and was told they don't go that far

Swift not paying you? I’ve worked for them for almost 6 years now..,NEVER had that problem. And neither have numerous friends I have who also work for Swift.

Fiction.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

Silver .'s Comment
member avatar

Its true you can look it up they had a law suit against them for not paying there drivers

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Its true you can look it up they had a law suit against them for not paying there drivers

OMG

Page 1 of 5 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More