Professionalism

Topic 24027 | Page 3

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Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

Cant help but laugh, im picking up a backhaul and noticed this guy showing up to a shipper dressed in full pajamas and slippers.......

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Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Pete M.'s Comment
member avatar

Better than the sleeveless t's that expose pecs. pits and spare tire...

JuiceBox's Comment
member avatar

If it's hot out and the shipper or consignee does not have PPE requirements that restrict the wear of shorts, I am wearing shorts. I agree with everything else though. Wearing pajamas at any place of business is ridiculous.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

OK I'm trying to get this out of my head: Big Scott wearing PJ's to a shipper with flip flops.

rofl-2.gifrofl-3.gif

Now Brett I thought on pg 22 that you said in your book that all receivers supply coffee and donuts? Just kidding. If that were the case we would all be 300 pounds!

I don't see anything wrong at being professional when we deliver or pick up our loads and dealing with the office at the shipper. When we all got our licences, it didn't say that we should be looking like a slob on the job. It's bad enough when you go into Wally world that so many people wear Pj's there.

Just my two cents worth seeing I was not available this week to participate in any discussions due to orientation at Swift.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

I am always amazed when I see drivers wearing flip-flops? Now we are a 100% no touch freight company. But I can't imagine wearing flip-flops although when I go to my terminal I do see some guys and gals wearing them. I feel less than professional if I haven't been able to shave and shower in a couple of days. Every now and then I have those runs where I'm not able to get a shower every other day. But I try to make up for it with a smile and professional behavior. Even though there are times I am frustrated with the shipper / receiver I never let them know it. They have the power to make your day even more miserable unfortunately.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Exactly, juicebox!

If it's hot out and the shipper or consignee does not have PPE requirements that restrict the wear of shorts, I am wearing shorts. I agree with everything else though. Wearing pajamas at any place of business is ridiculous.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Greg M.'s Comment
member avatar

Last week while pulling out of the yard there was a JB Hunt Intermodel truck pulled off to my right. The "heavy set" gentleman climbing out was wearing baggy sweat pants, and apparently nothing else underneath. As a result I was treated to a view of the rare 1 PM "full moon". You can't un-see something like that. A little part of me died that day.

Bill R.'s Comment
member avatar

As a result I was treated to a view of the rare 1 PM "full moon". You can't un-see something like that. A little part of me died that day.

dancing-banana.gifdancing-dog.gifdancing.gifrofl-3.gifrofl-2.gifrofl-1.gif

RAOFLMAO....thank you!!!!
my wife wants to know what I'm grinning at on the computer....
Bill

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

What I want to know is why is it always those gloriously rotund "professionals" who insist on laying on their bunks naked with the curtains open and the sleeper lights on in truck stops at night. It's never some seriously nice looking eye candy hahaha. That's the kind of stuff nobody wants to see.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Jrod's Comment
member avatar

While it's a good point, its a "Whattabouta" argument here.

"Let's fix A"

"But whattabouta C &D?"

"Let's talk about A for now"

What you say is true about sloppily dressed drivers with poor hygiene. Let's turn part of your comment around and ask why can't the shippers and receivers act like they actually give a damn, not treat show contempt towards drivers, and act in a professional and courteous manner?

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Here’s a pet peeve of mine. And I know everyone’s different. If you show up to a shipper or receiver, why don’t you try and look like you are ready to work? What ever happened to looking capable, competent and professional? Take pride in your appearance at least a little and maybe if we did that the trucking industry wouldn’t be so looked down upon.

double-quotes-end.png

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

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