Anti Gel Additive

Topic 24380 | Page 3

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Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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I only ever use it if I fuel in the south and head north during the winter. Maybe somebody else can elaborate but I thought fuel in the north was already pretreated? I've not ever gelled either. Thanks

Pretty much all fuel is treated to some extent this time of year, the northern states will use a higher dosage but even then it's only rated to 10 degrees, anything below that and you'll need to add.

Robert B. (The Dragon) ye's Comment
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What's the general rule of thumb if you're using the whole bottle? I've heard half of it in one tank, half in the other. Others say it doesn't matter it can all go in one tank?

Btw anybody coming through Chicagoland area next week. On Wednesday they are calling for a HIGH of -12 so with wind chill factor at least 30 below. Summer anyone?

Split it between both tanks. The fuel only draws from one to go up to the engine. The fuel from the other tank uses what's called a crossover and drains into the primary tank to keep a level balance. Unless you know which tank is the primary and which one secondary, you might only treat one and the secondary could get up. It's just safer to do them both.

Bird-one's Comment
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Interesting, thanks Rainy!!

TA and Petro representatives told me they treat all stations north of I40. But neither could tell me to what temps we are protected. So i anti gel. If they arent sure, why am i going to risk it?

As for the tank thing... one of my Cascadias had 2 different pumps on the tanks and the tanks were not connected. The other Cascadia was indeed connected, but i still put a portion in both tanks. My friend kept running out of fuel because the truck was only taking from one tank and they said she had "a blockage" between the tanks. they never identified what the blockage was.

Susan D. 's Comment
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Rainy, my 2016 Cascadia used to do that from time to time.. not pull from both tanks properly. They'd give me extra fuel stops, get me to cedar rapids to our shop and they'd blow out the connector between the tanks. It's caused when/if you happen to get trash in your fuel that inadvertently gets stuck in that line. After the truck would sit an hour, the fuel level would seep through and the fuel gauge would be more accurate.

Sometimes I'd get a vacuum drawn making the fuel caps difficult to remove, but lubricating the gasket helped solve that too.

Bird-one's Comment
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Thanks Robert. Makes sense.

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What's the general rule of thumb if you're using the whole bottle? I've heard half of it in one tank, half in the other. Others say it doesn't matter it can all go in one tank?

Btw anybody coming through Chicagoland area next week. On Wednesday they are calling for a HIGH of -12 so with wind chill factor at least 30 below. Summer anyone?

double-quotes-end.png

Split it between both tanks. The fuel only draws from one to go up to the engine. The fuel from the other tank uses what's called a crossover and drains into the primary tank to keep a level balance. Unless you know which tank is the primary and which one secondary, you might only treat one and the secondary could get up. It's just safer to do them both.

Bruce K.'s Comment
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Yeah, I'm one of the drivers in the deep freeze up here in Wisconsin. Currently on my home time, so the tractor is parked and plugged in. Called my company (Schneider) and asked if I needed antigel additive. They said no, wasn't necessary. But that I might want to get some antigel for my brain. Where do I buy that?

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
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I only ever use it if I fuel in the south and head north during the winter. Maybe somebody else can elaborate but I thought fuel in the north was already pretreated? I've not ever gelled either. Thanks

Something interesting I just read at Sapp Bros in Nebraska

"Attention Drivers: For your convenienxe, our winterized fuel is treated to perform in temperatures down to 10 degrees. If the temperatures drop below this, it is highly recommended you purchase one of our antigel additive selections."

Soooo winterized fuel only helps to 10 degrees. Perhaps Petro/TA and Pilot/FJ have different recommendations

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

PJ's Comment
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That is the industry standard. I have used Howe's in 2 different Pete's and never had an issue. I carry a set of spare filters also just in case with a bottle of diesel 911. Last week bouncing between Canada and NY My truck never shut off for 6 days. My bunk heater quit on their and I was sent to Canada on Fri and nowhere to get it fixed till this morning.

Susan D. 's Comment
member avatar

Definitely treat your fuel at 10°F and lower. When you're doing your pretrip, check your fuel filter.. if it's cloudy, your waxing up.. your truck will run crappy so get that filter changed asap. Have the mechanic prime the new filter with a little anti gel too, if you're not changing it yourself.

Those upper Midwest Winters are a beast and luckily I was taught by our mechanics in Cedar Rapids, how to protect my truck.

SAP:

Substance Abuse Professional

The Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) is a person who evaluates employees who have violated a DOT drug and alcohol program regulation and makes recommendations concerning education, treatment, follow-up testing, and aftercare.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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