Lying Recruiters And The Dirty Lies

Topic 24409 | Page 1

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Sonny B.'s Comment
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Recruiter said 1400 -$1800 a week! So I said ok and was willing to work hard and put up with anything to finish off my training , seating, upgrading and orientations and ride alongs and I did - Passed my backing tests and then got my first solo load and completed with no issues BUT - within all this training and tests - I had talked to many drivers about their pay and many showed me their pay stubs and it wasn't even CLOSE to that amount. Some drivers were even having issues receiving their pay! Truckers work long and hard hours and sacrifice a lot! AND that'd be fine with me but to lie about pay.......fudging the books, running the risk of running afoul of DOT cause your FM don't care, They put a lot on the shoulders of a driver - I love and Respect myself too much to allow a company to treat me bad if I am willing to give them my all ................. not sure what anyone else's experience was but this was mine. No sleep ,Poor diet ...... more sacrifices but lying about pay ? Is there even integrity in this field ? After my first assignment was complete and tendered my 'two weeks notice'. I'll look for a reputable company if they exist , not sure I want to eat crow for five years till I get in with a decent company but I am willing to work hard and dedicate myself to the lifestyle for the right company worthy of my commitment. I'm on the fence right now cause I love Trucking but my first experience was a let down ... Not sure if anyone else Self Respect and a strong work ethic , morals .. The first thing my trainer taught me is ' no pre inspects or post' and 'we all doctor the ELD's - frankly it's all BS, in that respect, Safe driving and getting it all done - I CAN DO THAT. Just the dirty side of trucking and the lying recruiters ...Back to the drawing board for me - I could be a great Trucker but not for this last company - not by a dang long shot

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Alexander, you say "many" drivers showed you their "pay stubs". Really? If another driver asked me about my pay, I'd tell him it was none of his business. Besides, pay stubs are a thing of the past. My company is paying me exactly what they advertised IF I did my part as a driver. And I've done that and so everything is good. Frankly, you sound like a self centered malcontent, based on your post.

Steve L.'s Comment
member avatar

Respectfully, you signed up here less than 72 hours ago and nothing good to say? AND you never came here for direction BEFORE getting your CDL & first gig?

There are plenty of good companies and recruiters who don’t need to lie. But, if you approach them the same as you’ve done here, they may not want you.

Leave that chip on your shoulder behind. Accept that you have your CDL and the first job wasn’t a good fit. Then take your best, most positive attitude to a big company like Schneider, Prime, Swift, Knight, McElroy, Maverick or some other and get rolling.

Good luck!

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Sonny B.'s Comment
member avatar

I guess if I had a question it'd be - How do you tell a good company from a bad one ...

Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar
I am willing to work hard and dedicate myself to the lifestyle for the right company worthy of my commitment

You say this but yet you are also turned in your two week notice after your first trip? All because a couple other drivers supposedly said they are not making 1,800k a week? Which company is this with?

1,800 has to he earned, you have to prove yourself to your company before they will trust you enough to send you that many miles. It will not be handed to you because you where semi able to start a truck each day on your own.

Imo you need to reevaluate your whole attitude because, I can tell no company will be "reputable" enough for you.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Truckin Along With Kearse's Comment
member avatar

Totally agree with Bobcat here!

You aren't committed. You gave up. And something newbies never understand is that those pay numbers that are advertised are "average" numbers meaning some drivers are way above that average and some are way below. Also, the really good numbers are those of experienced top producing drivers. I bet if i went to that company i would make that, because i am.making it now. but i didnt quit.

You just quit your first company as soon as you got there and you think another company is going to hire you? why would they? all you proved to them is you would waste their time and money.

what company are you talking about? Maybe some of us work there are could give you pointers.

and furthermore, what on this green earth makes you think you are worth $1400-$1800 per week when you have done nothing? at this point you are a liability cause you WILL hit something. you will have an accident.

all companies have drivers getting 1500 miles a week and others getting 3000. it about the driver not the company.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Ok, let's talk about pay. I don't usually share my pay info and especially not with other company drivers. But this is what I made for my 1st week on the road: $983.00 and that was take home pay. I don't even know how many miles I drove because I drove as many as my DOT clocks allowed me and I drove at a moderate pace and drove safely. I think that was a pretty good paycheck for my first week out as a solo OTR driver. I had two 1000 plus loads and a couple shorter and slower ones over the Ozark and Appalachian mountains. Didn't make much time on those trips but the scenery was wonderful. Maybe in the future my mileage pay might go up to where I can make those $1500 per week checks, but right now I'm happy with being paid this much to learn the trade and gain valuable experience. Also, my company does not pressure me in any way. They just want me to be safe and help is always a phone call away. Yeah, trucking is like Rainy said, it depends more on the driver than the company.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
CK's Comment
member avatar

To me, it sounds like you threw away the opportunity. You get exactly what you put in in this industry. I'm very curious which company you worked for.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

I guess if I had a question it'd be - How do you tell a good company from a bad one ...

Based on your post I’d strongly suggest taking a good look in the mirror for an answer. Your attitude is poor.

Reality check; as a rookie driver it’s reasonable to expect 40-50k income your first year of employment. As a reference point; most if not all of the experienced drivers on this forum are making over 65k, many close to or exceeding 80k annually. The drivers at the higher end of the pay scale have years of top performance and earned their way to higher pay.

It’s reasonable to expect that you will need to prove yourself and absorb a very steep learning curve. It’s all about performance and learning through experience. You threw in the towel after your first load before your first paycheck? A very foolish and shortsighted decision. This will not bode well as you look for another job. You are a risk.

All of your other complaints...? Just noise.

My advice? Adjust your attitude and reset your income expectations more inline with reality. Accept the fact that your income potential is linked directly to your performance as a driver. It will take time and a very strong commitment.

I’d apply to any company on this list that is equipped to road train an entry level driver:

Trucking Company Reviews

Apply For Truck Driving Jobs

...and be very careful how you explain your quick departure from your first employer.

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Alexander, don't give up, please. I'm sure you can drive a truck, but that's not the whole picture. Please take to heart all the advice you've received here by seasoned professionals. Reset your mental clock and move forward in a positive direction. I would ask you to respond to these posts and tell us if they are making any sense to you. People are here to help and you will show wisdom by accepting the constructive advice given free of charge here.

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