GPS

Topic 24422 | Page 2

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Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

I thought the Rand McNally GPS used the same maps as the atlas?

All maps have the roads in the same places. Therefore all gps units have the same maps. It is the ROUTING that is critical. Always check the gps routing against your RM Motor Carrier paper atlas. The front of the atlas has invaluable information for Truck Drivers. If you don't have one, GET ONE! Spend some time going through the information to farmiliarize yourself with it. Ask your Trainer to see his!

rofl-1.gifrofl-3.gif

Sorry, I couldn't resist that comment. I doubt he even owns one from the way you describe him.

∆_Danielsahn_∆'s Comment
member avatar

Also, just because I a route is truck legal, does not mean that it is truck friendly. It might be friendly for a class B, or a day cab pulling a pup or 48' trailer. But a truck like mine with a 280" wheelbase, 53' trailer and spread axles..... Well, You get the idea.

double-quotes-start.png

I thought the Rand McNally GPS used the same maps as the atlas?

double-quotes-end.png

All maps have the roads in the same places. Therefore all gps units have the same maps. It is the ROUTING that is critical. Always check the gps routing against your RM Motor Carrier paper atlas. The front of the atlas has invaluable information for Truck Drivers. If you don't have one, GET ONE! Spend some time going through the information to farmiliarize yourself with it. Ask your Trainer to see his!

rofl-1.gifrofl-3.gif

Sorry, I couldn't resist that comment. I doubt he even owns one from the way you describe him.

Day Cab:

A tractor which does not have a sleeper berth attached to it. Normally used for local routes where drivers go home every night.

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

double-quotes-start.png

I thought the Rand McNally GPS used the same maps as the atlas?

double-quotes-end.png

All maps have the roads in the same places. Therefore all gps units have the same maps. It is the ROUTING that is critical. Always check the gps routing against your RM Motor Carrier paper atlas. The front of the atlas has invaluable information for Truck Drivers. If you don't have one, GET ONE! Spend some time going through the information to farmiliarize yourself with it. Ask your Trainer to see his!

rofl-1.gifrofl-3.gif

Sorry, I couldn't resist that comment. I doubt he even owns one from the way you describe him.

I have the 2019 version. I have never seen him use one, he relies on a RM GPS. Then tells me not to follow it, LOL

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Mario H just gave the worst advice about GPS i have ever seen:

But in most cases, following GPS is a best idea.

Do NOT follow this advice.

Blindly following GPSs has put drivers in lakes, on beaches, on historic bridges above truck weight limits, and even in residential driveways. Following a GPS can slam you into a low clearance bridge or through a residential neighborhood with kids and dogs running around.

And yes, Im talking about the Truck GPSs.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

Mario H just gave the worst advice about GPS i have ever seen:

double-quotes-start.png

But in most cases, following GPS is a best idea.

double-quotes-end.png

Do NOT follow this advice.

Blindly following GPSs has put drivers in lakes, on beaches, on historic bridges above truck weight limits, and even in residential driveways. Following a GPS can slam you into a low clearance bridge or through a residential neighborhood with kids and dogs running around.

And yes, Im talking about the Truck GPSs.

Use everything, motor carrier atlas, GPS, satellite photos(showed me how to approach sites, where the docks are), and most importantly, common sense...😎😎

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Grumpy Old Man....

It is possible the trainer knows the roads and doesnt need the atlas for MOST routing or loads.

I travel the same routes so often that I pull it out for local driving, and US routes, not.interstates. I have been at this long enough to know many US routes also.

So i understand what he is doing. I also know the highway and exit numbers for many truck stops along the routes. I mainly use my GPS to give me the distance to the truck stops while my company NavGo for the customer.

Using both this way helps me determine how far i need to drive in a shift and where i can park.

It comes with time and experience.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote...

Mario H just gave the worst advice about GPS i have ever seen:

double-quotes-start.png

But in most cases, following GPS is a best idea.

double-quotes-end.png

Do NOT follow this advice.

Blindly following GPSs has put drivers in lakes, on beaches, on historic bridges above truck weight limits, and even in residential driveways. Following a GPS can slam you into a low clearance bridge or through a residential neighborhood with kids and dogs running around.

And yes, Im talking about the Truck GPSs.

So incredibly true. Rainy is “spot-on”.

Case in Point; there is a Walmart and Sam’s Club in a town near Reading Pa called Tremple. PA 222 and PA 61 are the major intersecting highways. For years when exiting the Sams to head north back to the DC, the Navigo (truckers GPS) would route onto a road called Heller Rd. Heller has an overpass marked for 10’.

Whomever blindly followed the GPS provided route was very quickly confronted with a very low bridge.

Use all of the tools and do not rely 100% on any GPS. Doing this is a huge mistake.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Mik D.'s Comment
member avatar

Rainy wrote...

double-quotes-start.png

Mario H just gave the worst advice about GPS i have ever seen:

double-quotes-start.png

double-quotes-start.png

But in most cases, following GPS is a best idea.

double-quotes-end.png

double-quotes-end.png

Do NOT follow this advice.

Blindly following GPSs has put drivers in lakes, on beaches, on historic bridges above truck weight limits, and even in residential driveways. Following a GPS can slam you into a low clearance bridge or through a residential neighborhood with kids and dogs running around.

And yes, Im talking about the Truck GPSs.

double-quotes-end.png

So incredibly true. Rainy is “spot-on”.

Case in Point; there is a Walmart and Sam’s Club in a town near Reading Pa called Tremple. PA 222 and PA 61 are the major intersecting highways. For years when exiting the Sams to head north back to the DC, the Navigo (truckers GPS) would route onto a road called Heller Rd. Heller has an overpass marked for 10’.

Whomever blindly followed the GPS provided route was very quickly confronted with a very low bridge.

Use all of the tools and do not rely 100% on any GPS. Doing this is a huge mistake.

Like when Apple came out with there maps function and it was screwed up..women followed the GPS into a desert when she was suppose to be near homes and ran out of gas, and another women drove down a boat ramp following the gps/map function...😂🤣😆

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
member avatar

Grumpy Old Man....

It is possible the trainer knows the roads and doesnt need the atlas for MOST routing or loads.

I travel the same routes so often that I pull it out for local driving, and US routes, not.interstates. I have been at this long enough to know many US routes also.

So i understand what he is doing. I also know the highway and exit numbers for many truck stops along the routes. I mainly use my GPS to give me the distance to the truck stops while my company NavGo for the customer.

Using both this way helps me determine how far i need to drive in a shift and where i can park.

It comes with time and experience.

That is true, he has been to all these places before. I just wish he wouldn’t tell me to follow the GPS and then yell when I do.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Haha. My PSD instructor set rhe GPS for the Gworge Washington Bridge from NY to NJ at 1700. I went the Tappen Zee. He was yelling and pointing.. THAT WAY. i was like "nope! This way is safer and the GPS is a tool". lol

PSD:

Prime Student Driver

Prime Inc has a CDL training program and the first phase is referred to as PSD. You'll get your permit and then 10,000 miles of on the road instruction.

The following is from Prime's website:

Prime’s PSD begins with you obtaining your CDL permit. Then you’ll go on the road with a certified CDL instructor for no less than 75 hours of one-on-one behind the wheel training. After training, you’ll return to Prime’s corporate headquarters in Springfield, Missouri, for final CDL state testing and your CDL license.

Obtain CDL Permit / 4 Days

  • Enter program, study and test for Missouri CDL permit.
  • Start driving/training at Prime Training Center in Springfield, Missouri.
  • Work toward 40,000 training dispatched miles (minimum) with food allowance while without CDL (Food allowance is paid back with future earnings).

On-the-Road Instruction / 10,000 Miles

  • Train with experienced certified CDL instructor for 3-4 weeks in a real world environment.
  • Get 75 hours of behind-the-wheel time with one-on-one student/instructor ratio.
  • Earn 10,000 miles toward total 40,000 miles needed.
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