Any Recommendations On Roehl?

Topic 24460 | Page 3

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RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

Hi, Randall. I currently drive for U.S. Xpress. I honestly can't say anything bad about the company. Although starting pay is lower than some of the other major carriers. The fleet managers and account managers I've had are very helpful. As long as you communicate with them (and I'm sure it's the same with any company) they are more than willing to offer any help or advice you need and work with you. So far as dedicated "Dollar" accounts go...most of our more experienced drivers and moderators will not recommend those accounts to new drivers. Many locations require difficult backing maneuvers while avoiding cars and other vehicles in tight parking lots. They also require you to unload your trailer at the store. I have a friend who started on a Dollar General account right away and he's doing just fine. But personally I wouldn't want to do it.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

As far as not getting paid during schooling, Roehl is the only one i know who who pays you from day 1. Everyone else pays upon getting the CDL so that is usually 3 weeks to a month between orientation and school.

Prime offers $200 per week pay advance while you have your permit for your meals OTR. If you request to go to Prime in Pittston PA or Salt Lake City UT, you can keep your permit from home.

we have quite a few women on this forum. Latest figures have it at 9% nationally...and last i checked my company is about 16%. I think these fiigures are low however. i see a lot of women...and a lot of women run teams with their hubbies.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Roehl did not used to pay a salary during the 3 weeks of schooling. I’ll find out if that changed, sounds like it did from Rainy’s post. You have to provide your own transportation to school and home. What they don’t tell you up front is when you grad they will pay you mileage to and from home. They own their own hotel in Marshfield. You are responsible for your own meals. They expanded their atlanta terminal , they moved into the former Central Refridgerated site. They have a southeast regional fleet that runs pretty hard.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Rainy was absoutely correct, as usual. Roehl is paying 90 a day from day 1 of cdl school

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Bird 's Comment
member avatar

I did about 3 months on the Dollar Tree account with Schneider out of Joliet, Il. And we shared that yard with US Xpress. So I frequently spoke with them. That said, I can tell you 1100 to 1200 dollars is high. Unless they restructurted their pay, they weren't making anymore than we were, and we certainly not making that much. Those numbers maybe for some of their veteran drivers but 9 times out of 10 i was speaking with a new driver. Turnover was sky-high. So again it maybe different now. Brett I believe drove for Dollar Tree for US Xpress so maybe he'll chime in. But the term "brutal" is about the best way to sum up this account. Also keep in mind They operate regionally so you're not going to be seeing the miles otr will see. So if you're looking to sit back, relax, and enjoy the countryside I wouldn't recommend. Wouldn't recommend at all.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Bobcat_Bob's Comment
member avatar

I tired to get my CDL through Roehl, unfortunately I failed their physical aptitude test and got sent home by lunch time day 1. They still paid me for half a day which was nice and they seems like a great company, everyone I met was super friendly.

If I ever get sick of linehaul and want to try OTR again, I would give them a call again in a heart beat.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Linehaul:

Linehaul drivers will normally run loads from terminal to terminal for LTL (Less than Truckload) companies.

LTL (Less Than Truckload) carriers will have Linehaul drivers and P&D drivers. The P&D drivers will deliver loads locally from the terminal and pick up loads returning them to the terminal. Linehaul drivers will then run truckloads from terminal to terminal.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

A few months ago, I did a numbers crunch to show the difference between Roehl and Prime. Prime doesnt pay during the orientation and permit...but that can be 2 to 3 weeks depending on how fast you test. Then Prime pays $700 per week until you upgrade. Roehl paid $500 per week, but you upgrade sooner. Starting pay at Prime is higher.

In the end, over six months to a year, it worked out to about the same, not including bonuses cause i never found roehl bonus info.

BrandonCDLdriver's Comment
member avatar
Warning From The Moderators: The garbage you're about to read from Brandon is the typical nonsense and negativity you'll find all over the web. None of it is true, which we're about to show you. We've kept it here because you're going to hear others talk like this and we want you to read our replies so you can understand why you should ignore this kind of garbage. In fact, we refer to these types as terminal rats and I've done a podcast about this here:

Episode 10: Terminal Rats Are Derailing Trucking Careers

We hope this helps clear up some of the negativity and where it comes from. Thanks, and brace yourself............

I've talked to drivers of Roehl and one had nothing good to say about them. I met him in a repair shop at a Loves in Jeffersonville OH. He said the trucks are slow, the pay is low and dispatchers are clueless. His truck was down for maintenance he said the 3rd time in a week.

Other than that I've never talked to a driver for Roehl who said anything positive about the company. Remember the megas became megas because they don't pay their drivers well. Swift, JB Hunt, Knight and Prime and even Werner are examples of this. Ozark starts their drivers almost a dime more than some megas but its taken them longer to grow because they actually pay their drivers. That guy also complained that Roehl didn't get him home on time and he missed his daughters high school graduation.

What you have to consider is that reviews of companies that are megas mostly come from either drivers who are their favorites and given all the best routes or drivers who have ****ed someone off and given crappy routes. Ozark has favortism issues for some older drivers but its apparently getting worked out. But I've heard many megas drivers complain about favorite drivers making mega bucks (no pun intended) and the new drivers barely squeaking by.

A recruiter is paid to tell you what you want to hear. You need to take what they say with a grain of salt and read real company reviews from places like glassdoor. I made the decision to go with Ozark after reading what glassdoor had to say, not what a recruiter told me. Turns out my recruiter was very honest. But not long ago I was talking to one who totally withheld the fact that they will take 500 dollars of my money and put it into an escrow account to use if I ever damage anything. We talked for 3 days and she never mentioned this. A review on a forum gave me a heads up on that. When I confronted her about it she said "yea but it's just 500 dollars" I said yea its just my money and I'm keeping it. Goodbye. I hung up on her.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Old School's Comment
member avatar

Brandon, this nonsense of yours got approved for two reasons...

1) To show our members what kind of driver we're dealing with here.

2) To see if there's any way to help you out. I'm pretty sure you're already over the line, but I promise you some of the responses coming your way are gonna be quite different than you expected.

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Brandon I hate to burst your bubble, but I started with Roehl and went through their school. They hired me and I stayed until I decided to do something different. The trucks were in good condition and pretty new. Everything I was told was spot on. The dry van trailers were aging and in line for replacement. I never once had an issue getting paid correctly, plenty of miles, and treated well. I was brand new so a favorite I was not. All I did was my job too the best of my ability. I have friends that worked or still are working there. They have never had any significant issues either. I have seen drivers that had issues and everyone of them were problems themselves. One I remember very well was fired after getting into a yelling match with a terminal manager. I walked in while it was going on. Had I still been a cop I would have arrested that driver on the spot for his hostile openly combative manner. Every company has great, good, and poor employees. However there is a proper way to handle issues. No company is perfect, but they are in business for a reason. There are areas it is difficult to get too... You would need to provide much more detail for me too say the company was completely at fault. I'm not specifically sticking up for the company, but I'm not taking your accusations at face value either. I just call things the way I see them. I understand issues arise, but you deal with it and don't throw the baby out with the bath water either.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Dry Van:

A trailer or truck that that requires no special attention, such as refrigeration, that hauls regular palletted, boxed, or floor-loaded freight. The most common type of trailer in trucking.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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