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RealDiehl's Comment
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Today was my last day with US Xpress. I gave my notice 5 weeks ago and for the past couple weeks my account manager has been calling me every few days and asking me to reconsider. I have mixed feelings about leaving. On the one hand I'm excited to start my new job, on the other, I feel a little guilty about leaving this one. My account manager was such a nice man. He was generous with compliments and always expressed his appreciation when I did some extra things to help him out. I'd pick up trailers from different locations and bring them back to the yard or to our terminal in Shippensburg. Either on a day off or before or after my scheduled run. If a driver forgot to fill his reefer before dropping it, he'd ask me to go on duty early and take it to the truck stop to get it filled before I picked up. On several occasions, he'd call me on short notice and ask if I could do an unscheduled run to cover for another driver who was sick or had mechanical issues. I never said no. He called me his go-to driver and even gave me the handle that I use on this site (my last name is Diehl by the way). I don't consider myself an above average driver. I think that will be made apparent when I go back over the road at the end of this month. My clock management skills have not been tested in many months. My talent lay in being available and willing to do anything my manager asked me to do...and doing it with a positive attitude. It goes to show you that hustling for your dispatcher or fleet manager , etc. and having a good attitude is one good way to establish yourself in this business.

After saying goodbye to my account manager, his boss called me and tried to talk me into staying. I explained my reasons for leaving and told him how much I enjoyed working with everyone on the account. He thanked me for finishing out my notice period (I guess some drivers give notice and leave before their stated date) and assured me I'd be eligible for rehire if I ever wanted to return. Then he told me a driver placement representative was going to call and tell me about some other driving jobs/accounts with US Xpress that I might be interested in. I thanked her for calling me and told her that I was already committed to - and had a start date - with my new company.

I guess I'm posting this update because I'm full of nervous energy right now and more importantly - as I mentioned above - I think it's important to establish a reputation for a strong work ethic and good attitude from the moment you start this career. Even if you make some mistakes at first, if you learn from them and keep doing your best, you will be appreciated!

Now I have two full weeks off. I haven't had more than 40 hours off in a row since April. It will be nice to relax...

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Over The Road:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

Dispatcher:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Fleet Manager:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

Reefer:

A refrigerated trailer.

EPU:

Electric Auxiliary Power Units

Electric APUs have started gaining acceptance. These electric APUs use battery packs instead of the diesel engine on traditional APUs as a source of power. The APU's battery pack is charged when the truck is in motion. When the truck is idle, the stored energy in the battery pack is then used to power an air conditioner, heater, and other devices

Grumpy Old Man's Comment
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Good luck in your new job. I’m sure you will do well.

Turtle's Comment
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Bravo on doing this the right way, RealDiehl. It shows good character, and that alone will serve you well. Best of luck to ya!

Brett Aquila's Comment
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I loved everything you said but you never said why you're leaving and what the new company has to offer that the old one didn't.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

I loved everything you said but you never said why you're leaving and what the new company has to offer that the old one didn't.

I am leaving for a couple reasons. My new company, Prime, is offering 6 cents more per mile. Plus they offer bonuses that US Xpress does not. It will be motivating to have little, short term goals to shoot for. Like the fuel bonus. Another reason is because Prime was my first choice when I began looking at companies. I wasn't able to get on board with them initially but, I knew/hoped I would eventually. Another reason is Trucking Truth itself. Their are many Prime drivers here...lots of people I'm familiar with and trust to answer any Prime-specific questions I might have. If all things were equal, I'd have been happy staying with US Xpress. For drivers looking to try something other than OTR , US Xpress has a lot of regional and dedicated options to choose from. They have my willing endorsement.

Regional:

Regional Route

Usually refers to a driver hauling freight within one particular region of the country. You might be in the "Southeast Regional Division" or "Midwest Regional". Regional route drivers often get home on the weekends which is one of the main appeals for this type of route.

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Awesome. Refrigerated is a little bit different you'll find, for sure. Both Prime and US Xpress are fantastic companies so you can't go wrong either way. At some point you might consider their flatbed or food grade tanker divisions, also, so that's a nice bonus.

PackRat's Comment
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Way to make the split the right way. I hope you find continued success at Prime.good-luck.gif

Matthew N.'s Comment
member avatar

As a current USX driver I'm sad to see you go but wish you the best. It's refreshing to read about some one resigning with class and style.

Don't get mad when those red trucks pass you doing 64 mph. :)

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PJ's Comment
member avatar

Congrats on the new gig. You will do well anywhere you choose. Enjoy the ride!!

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

RealDiehl's Comment
member avatar

As a current USX driver I'm sad to see you go but wish you the best. It's refreshing to read about some one resigning with class and style.

Don't get mad when those red trucks pass you doing 64 mph. :)

Lol! Yes, I Iove moving at 68mph. But to be honest I usually cruise at 66. I thought I was the only us xpress driver on this site. Are you OTR or dedicated?

OTR:

Over The Road

OTR driving normally means you'll be hauling freight to various customers throughout your company's hauling region. It often entails being gone from home for two to three weeks at a time.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
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