Stevens Transport & CFI

Topic 24553 | Page 1

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Professor_Eye_M's Comment
member avatar

I have a question for Trucking Truth and any drivers who are employed with Stevens Transport.

Last week, I had filled out an application to Stevens Transport for the CDL training. This was one of my strongest choices to get into, besides the fact that their contractual commitment is 3 years. When I had applied, I already had the mindset that they will say NO due to my record but from the suggestions that the experienced drivers on here had said to me, which was apply like crazy, that's what I did. APPLY LIKE CRAZY! I didn't apply like crazy per se, but I did apply to that application link on here. As well, I had put an application/profile on Driver Pulse. Before I know it, I had recruiters calling me like crazy. It was a great feeling to have companies calling me trying to get me in their program at the beginning. Once I had revealed to them about my record, the NO's just came flying in all over the place. I wanted to just lie and keep it all a secret because I just wanted to get on the road and get the experience. But I couldn't. I had to be honest. This is what most experienced truckers like Old School, Rainy D, Brett, Big Scott, and many others on here preach to us newbies, especially us newbies with records. So I had to man up and be very honest with them. At first, it was very discouraging to have these NO'S thrown at my face. But I remember something what Brett had preached throughout so many posts to newbies who gets so discourage..."HOW BAD DO YOU WANT IT?" I don't believe this was verbatim but the emotions were the same. So I had to ask myself HOW BAD DO I WANT TO BE A TRUCKER? And the answer is simple, BADLY. Plus, that's how life works. When you want something so bad, you will have to work hard to get. It won't be easy. Once you get it though, it will be more appreciative rather than it to be handed to you easily.

Now, what's exactly on my record that I'm receiving so many NO's? Here are the following:

2015 - Misdemeanor charge for battery/makes physical contact. Still under supervision until my fines are fully paid.

2016 - Failed DOT drug test while attending KLLM company based CDL training (Not sure if it was reported. Regardless if it was on my DAC or anywhere else or not, I want to be honest rather than being secretive. I don't have anything to hide or am I embarrased about it. Plus, I heard trucking companies will find out about it.).

2017 - +15 mph Speeding ticket in Missouri (it's been paid)

I could give a sob story about each event but what's been done, is done and mistakes were made. These are nothing but life lessons and I thank God I had manifested through each one. It could had been worse.

With that being said, I had applied to Stevens Transport with the mindset that they will say NO instantly. So what do I have to lose? Throughout the application, I was faced with a couple questions that I wanted to lie but I know I have to be very truthful. The questions were:

1) Ever tested positive or refused a pre-employment drug or alcohol test? I had answered YES and explained that it was in 2016. However, I didn't specify it was a DOT test.

2) Have you had any tickets in the last 3 years? Number of tickets in last 3 years. I had answered 1 ticket and explained it was in 2016 in Missouri going +15 mph.

Unfortunately, there wasn't any questions pertaining to felonies/convictions, otherwise, I would had truthfully explained about that as well.

After I'd finished and submitted the application, I felt very bittersweet about it because this was one of the companies I wouldn't mind working for, minus the 3 year contract (this isn't a deal breaker or anything but 3 years sounds pretty nail-biting, however, beggars can't be choosers.). Anyhoo, about a few days later I had received a pre hire letter from Stevens Transport. That really had shocked me because it was so unexpected. I had to rethink to myself about if I had truthfully answered the questions on the application, which I did. Immediately after realizing that I did, I felt like there's hope and it had uplifted my spirits; I became more determined to overcome this obstacle of what others may had just simply gave up. From my research, I understand that a PRE HIRE LETTER is simply an invitation to an orientation to weed out the applicants and it's not an official letter of employment. But just to see a pre hire letter in my position can really give a person courage and hope. I haven't called them back to go through a background or whatever because A) I'm not planning to go to any CDL training until around June or July of this year. I want to get all of my ducks line up. B) I just have that small fear that they will say "sorry, you're not a qualified candidate." Fearing the unknown is a b**ch sometimes. As a wise person once said to me "A scared man can't win and a dead man can't play."

On another note, I had received a message from CFI asking me to give them a call about my application. When I had seen this, I immediately thought about Big Scott who parlays on here. If you're reading this Big Scott, what would you suggest? Would I qualify? I know it's better for me to call the recruiter but what are your thoughts?

Thank you all for reading.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Manifest:

Bill of Lading

An accurate record of everything being shipped on a truck, often times used as a checklist during unloading.

DOT:

Department Of Transportation

A department of the federal executive branch responsible for the national highways and for railroad and airline safety. It also manages Amtrak, the national railroad system, and the Coast Guard.

State and Federal DOT Officers are responsible for commercial vehicle enforcement. "The truck police" you could call them.

BMI:

Body mass index (BMI)

BMI is a formula that uses weight and height to estimate body fat. For most people, BMI provides a reasonable estimate of body fat. The BMI's biggest weakness is that it doesn't consider individual factors such as bone or muscle mass. BMI may:

  • Underestimate body fat for older adults or other people with low muscle mass
  • Overestimate body fat for people who are very muscular and physically fit

It's quite common, especially for men, to fall into the "overweight" category if you happen to be stronger than average. If you're pretty strong but in good shape then pay no attention.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

DAC:

Drive-A-Check Report

A truck drivers DAC report will contain detailed information about their job history of the last 10 years as a CDL driver (as required by the DOT).

It may also contain your criminal history, drug test results, DOT infractions and accident history. The program is strictly voluntary from a company standpoint, but most of the medium-to-large carriers will participate.

Most trucking companies use DAC reports as part of their hiring and background check process. It is extremely important that drivers verify that the information contained in it is correct, and have it fixed if it's not.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Professor_Eye_M's Comment
member avatar

I'd forgot to add...

With everything that was said with Stevens Transport, should I be worried and forget about the whole pre hire letter or call them and give it a shot? I don't have anything else on my record that should hinder me.

Pre Hire:

What Exactly Is A Pre-Hire Letter?

Pre-hire letters are acceptance letters from trucking companies to students, or even potential students, to verify placement. The trucking companies are saying in writing that the student, or potential student, appears to meet the company's minimum hiring requirements and is welcome to attend their orientation at the company’s expense once he or she graduates from truck driving school and has their CDL in hand.

We have an excellent article that will help you Understand The Pre-Hire Process.

A Pre-Hire Letter Is Not A Guarantee Of Employment

The people that receive a pre-hire letter are people who meet the company's minimum hiring requirements, but it is not an employment contract. It is an invitation to orientation, and the orientation itself is a prerequisite to employment.

During the orientation you will get a physical, drug screen, and background check done. These and other qualifications must be met before someone in orientation is officially hired.

Turtle's Comment
member avatar

Absolutely give them a call, Professor. It's another step in the right direction, and will show equal measures of humility and determination.

While it can certainly be seen as a sign of hope, you should still prepare yourself for the possibility of yet another rejection. Don't give up hope though.

First things first, call them. They've left the door slightly ajar. Get your foot in there.

Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

Yes, you should pursue every single opportunity available. Just keep in mind that all of these carriers are the elite in this industry. You can't go wrong with any of them. All you need is one opportunity from any of them and you're on your way.

Anyone who reads through our forum and our trucker's blog will notice one glaring difference between us and everyone else. We teach people to focus on making themselves the best driver they can be while others focus on finding just the right company to work for. Why is that?

First of all, a lousy driver is going to have a lousy experience anywhere they work. They're not going to get good miles, the best runs, and the special favors that the top tier drivers get. They also tend to be the type that doesn't take personal responsibility for the outcome of their endeavors. When things don't go well for them it's always some else's fault.

So the lousy drivers get it in their mind that it's the company's fault things aren't going their way. They try to convince themselves and others that choosing the wrong company was the cause of their problems, so choosing a good company and avoiding the bad ones is paramount to success in this industry.

We, on the other hand, are a group of top performing, experienced professionals who have proven over the years that a Top Tier Driver will get great miles, great runs, the best equipment, fantastic treatment, and special favors at any of the major carriers out there, it doesn't matter which one you choose. This is a performance based industry and we focus on helping new drivers learn how to perform and succeed at the highest level. We never teach that choosing some magical, mythical Unicorn Company will be your salvation. Quite the opposite, in fact. You'll get what you deserve from the major carriers in this industry. They're all the best of the best. Your job is to prove you are, also.

So pursue every opportunity. All of the major carriers are great places to work. Don't worry about the name on the side of the truck.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Rainy 's Comment
member avatar

Heres a thought... you wont be ready for another 4 months or so, so why not wait until you are ready? that puts more time distance between your infractions which will make you look more responsible every month that passes.

Also you said you are under supervision until yiur fines are paid. Pay those darn things!!! Not paying them looks irresponsible, paying them looks like you accept reaponsility.

Remember, stevens is great, but they didnt ask about the assault so they could easily retract that letter or you could go and get sent home

CFI is indeed more lenient than some other companies, so you may have a chance there.

good luck

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Always call. You have a 50% chance....it will either be "Yes" or "No". If you don't call, that's a 100% NO. good-luck.gif

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Where did you get the 3 year contract term with Stevens?? A friend of mine recently completed their schooling and only has a 1 year contract.

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