Had Minor Fender Bender Today.

Topic 24666 | Page 4

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Rob D.'s Comment
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G-Town,

Thanks for the positive comments. From what I have read on this forum, the first year is kind of like boot camp for trucking. If you can make it through that, you've got a good chance to succeed. I found Turtle's recap of his first year (I can't find it now) encouraging. I fully expect to struggle with developing the skills its takes to succeed. I am also intend to go into it with the attitude like Richard Gere in An Officer and a Gentlemen. I may even recreate the scene with Louis Gossett, Jr. "You can throw me off this truck, but you can't make me quit." I am leaning toward flatbed because, I actually want to have the added challenge of securing the load. Plus, from what I understand (after reading Brett's book) having as many certifications and skills as possible makes you that much more in demand.

I just want to believe that after one of year of hell, you can get to the point where you can actually like the lifestyle.

Thanks again.

Rob.

JoAnne EC's Comment
member avatar

Thanks, JoAnne

It's a better day. I haven't unloaded yet, I got here early, but I think they are going to make me wait until 1030 mountain time.

But at least the truck is warm inside.

When I got here it was 27 and it has warmed to 32. Now that is progress.

Raptor

Thinking warm, positive thoughts for ya!

Do you know where you're off to after you unload?

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Rob wrote:

I am also intend to go into it with the attitude like Richard Gere in An Officer and a Gentlemen. I may even recreate the scene with Louis Gossett, Jr. "You can throw me off this truck, but you can't make me quit."

Please don’t... reread the blog article I sent you in a previous reply.

A positive attitude is warranted, but stop short on the Hollywood Drama.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

G-town.

I'll follow your advice. Although the "lay low" advice got me in trouble in basic training. I got dubbed as a wallflower and then became a target for the DIs. Maybe I'll get lucky and get Turtle as a trainer. I am leaning toward Prime based on many of the comments on this forum. Do you have any strong feelings one way or another about Prime?

Rob

Tractor Man's Comment
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Turtle doesn't Train. His wife rides with him. There are lots of good choices. It depends on what fits for you. I am very happy at Swift. It works for me. Good luck!

G-Town's Comment
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Rob...worried about being a pegged as a "wall flower"...

G-town.

I'll follow your advice. Although the "lay low" advice got me in trouble in basic training. I got dubbed as a wallflower and then became a target for the DIs. Maybe I'll get lucky and get Turtle as a trainer. I am leaning toward Prime based on many of the comments on this forum. Do you have any strong feelings one way or another about Prime?

Rob

Thanks for your service! Good to know.

Rob you are new to the forum and don't know me too well,...but I'd be the last person who would suggest that you conduct yourself like a Wall Flower. Sorry if I mislead you...

I thought I had replied with this Article Link on this thread, but it was the one about WilTrans...

The EGO Becomes the Downfall of CDL Students

Please read this...there won't be a quiz in the morning, but let me know if it resonates with you. Hopefully it will...

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Rob D,

I love this job and the freedom and money it provides. I'm given a message to pick up a load, then I decide when to leave and how to get there. My FM is very hands off. He is there when i need him and leaves me alone when I dont.

Traveling the country is awesome. But it is a hard lifestyle. I need to decompress and take a break once in awhile. I pamper myself in all ways possible.

This is what you make of it.

check this out

Trucking: A Total Culture Shock

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

G-Town

Good article and it definitely does resonate with me. My attitude with regard to learning is even if I think the instructor is wrong and I have a better way to do it, I am going to do it his way during school and with my trainer. I might explore my own ideas later as I develop my own ways, but while I'm learning, I'll do it their way.

Rainy D.

Thanks for the insight. The freedom part appeals to me. Not that I don't expect to work, but as you mentioned the freedom to choose how you get the load there.

I've got considerable time to explore the job before I dive in. So I will continue to learn as much as I can about the job before I take the plunge.

Rob.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Mouse's Comment
member avatar

Rob D,

In the trucking world, we need to own up to our responsibilities and mistakes. His company already knows it is his fault, and honestly they expect new drivers to have accidents like this. It is how one gains the skills and knowledge needed to endure.

Wait, wait, back that thought up a second (but GOAL first, hehe). So a fender bender wouldn't necessarily be the end of a trucking career? Gracious, I've had that in my head all this time and it's been rather stressful, especially considering I live full-time in the truck so I was thinking I'd lose both my job and my "house" at the same time if I bumped into anything. Don't get me wrong, I would still drive just as carefully as I can but it would take a little worry off my mind.

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Mouse, one of the reasons we stress Company Sponsored CDL Schooling is because that company has invested time and money in you. They are definitely more forgiving because of it.

My first month out, i knocked an axle off my trailer. Not only am i still here at Prime, but I now have 3 years safe driving AND 3 years on time delivery.

I was devastated. I avoided the terminals for months afraid i would get fired. The difference between me and another from my class is that i said "it was totally my fault. I got distracted and didnt swing wide enough". I didnt even get a "dont do it again." I got, "Do you know ehat yo do next time?".

My classmate yelled at the FM screaming it was his trainers fault, that he was suing Prime for even questioning him, and he wanted his contract voided. They offered to send him out with another trainer since he claimed the trainer was lacking. He ranted so much, they considered him too volatile and sent him.packing the next day.

When we say own up to your mistakes., we mean it.

My trainee had an incident where he didnt swing wide enough while entering a customer. He banged up the trailer skirt and spare tire holder on a large boulder. He was nervous he was getting in trouble. He got the same response.

They want us to learn from our mistakes. My FM once joked, "Every driver messes something up....ONCE".

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Fm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.
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