Followed GPS Onto Frozen Lake

Topic 24710 | Page 2

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Tractor Man's Comment
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I couldn't find the depot on the road atlas.

Home Depot will not be printed on the Atlas. But the Street and intersection will be there.

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G-Town's Comment
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Tractor Man

I think you're afraid of Rainy's dungeon! Not that I would blame you.

I have been planning my trips with my road atlas a d finding that it does quite well at bring me where I need to go. But I also use the Qualcomm. So I have a back up plan. I tried going to the Homeless depot from our Indiana terminal and it sent me through residential so I turned around and came back to the terminal for the night. I couldn't find the depot on the road atlas. So I thought I would get to a depot o e of these days.

You can't rely on the Qualcomm for you basic routing.

Raptor

Entering the exact address on the NaviGo (Swift GPS) will indeed route you to the correct location of the Home Depot. I use this feature constantly. Comparing the GPS route to the Atlas ensures the roads are truck friendly.

Google Maps should also be used to identify best way to access and then exit your final destination. Especially if unfamiliar with the surrounding area.

Use all of the tools available for trip planning. It will reduce the chances of what Raptor described.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Don's Comment
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Great advice regarding the use of electronic resources and the telephone. Most consignee are very helpful with providing special information on getting to their site.

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I always used various sources for directions and made sure at least several of them matched up. I would use my GPS, I would look at the Qualcomm directions, and I would use the satellite view on Google Maps. If it seemed straightforward and pretty obvious I'd go with those as long as two of the three matched up with each other.

If I had any doubt at all I would call the customer and get directions. The thing about calling the customer is that they know the little intricacies of getting into the place that won't show up anywhere else. You can pick up some very important little details from actually calling the customer.

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Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
B_Dawg's Comment
member avatar

There was a driver who drove onto the Boardwalk in Atlantic City because he was following the GPS...so those of you who have been there can just start picturing how many red flags he ignored accomplishing that little feat.

I try not to rely on GPS. I use it mainly for the highways and interstates, and I'll cross-reference with Google maps for the shipper/receiver locations and any areas I'm not sure of...especially when I'm forced to detour. I've had two trainers and neither of them used anything other than GPS and neither had time or desire to teach me the atlas, so I had to teach myself and admittedly, I really need to get better at using it. I also call the shipper/receiver because there's just too many times where the address on file is the OFFICE address and the warehouse is 2 miles away. when I call, I always ask for someone from shipping/receiving because office people and security may very well know the area like the back of their hand, but the directions they give don't necessarily take into account the fact you're in a 70' truck.

bottom line, using multiple sources is awesome but no matter how many tools you use, if you ain't got no common sense to react to what your eyes are telling you then you shouldn't be driving.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Interstate:

Commercial trade, business, movement of goods or money, or transportation from one state to another, regulated by the Federal Department Of Transportation (DOT).

Dm:

Dispatcher, Fleet Manager, Driver Manager

The primary person a driver communicates with at his/her company. A dispatcher can play many roles, depending on the company's structure. Dispatchers may assign freight, file requests for home time, relay messages between the driver and management, inform customer service of any delays, change appointment times, and report information to the load planners.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

B-Dawg wrote:

bottom line, using multiple sources is awesome but no matter how many tools you use, if you ain't got no common sense to react to what your eyes are telling you then you shouldn't be driving.

Truer words were never written. Spot-on!

PackRat's Comment
member avatar

B-Dawg wrote:

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bottom line, using multiple sources is awesome but no matter how many tools you use, if you ain't got no common sense to react to what your eyes are telling you then you shouldn't be driving.

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Truer words were never written. Spot-on!

*LIKE*

PJ's Comment
member avatar

Amen to that!!!!

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