Followed GPS Onto Frozen Lake

Topic 24710 | Page 1

Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:
Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

One more example of why you cannot rely on GPS. It is a tool. it is not full.proof.

Driver Follows GPS onto Frozen Lake

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

Great advertisement for that company....What an idiot.

Chuck S.'s Comment
member avatar

I had a young man get on my truck for his 4 week company training and instantly told me he purchased this new $500 gps just for trucking and that he was going to use it. Well I had to give him the bad news as soon as he told me about his purchase, and that was for the first 3 weeks while on the truck he will learn gettin around the country the old fashion way ... by motor carrier map... and company directions from the qualcomm ... He made it the first 3 weeks and the day he turned on his new gps we were leaving a shipper I had been to several times... late at night and he was driving. As we exited his gps was telling him to go straight, about the same time I was telling him to turn left. His response was, "if this gps is telling me to go straight I am going straight" My response was ok... go straight thru the intersection and pull over to the curb and park it... then pack up your gps, and the rest of your stuff, and while you are doing that I will call the company and tell them they have a student who needs a cab.

There was a bit of a silence then he muttered ok... I'll turn left.

I took him a couple of days to ask what it was about that gps issue the other night and I told him... it was a dead end, and I've seen a few trucks backing out of there... he got the picture.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Big T's Comment
member avatar

My first mentor and I had a situation one time leaving our West Valley terminal. Swift's routing program had not been updated to show that one of the roads now went through to a light. Instead it wanted you to make a left and a right which left you trying to enter a busy street from a stop sign instead of a stop light.

I told him I was going straight instead of following the navigation since I could clearly see the light. I was told no I had to follow the navigation. This resulted in being stuck at the stop sign for almost 20 minutes.

When he took a breath from complaining about being stuck at the stop sign I looked at him and told him I was sure glad I followed the electronic navigation instead of my eyes.

It was a quiet couple days in the truck.

I let my students use the Qualcomm navigation, but they have to use their eyes and double check routing using the motor carrier atlas.

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar
My response was ok... go straight thru the intersection and pull over to the curb and park it... then pack up your gps, and the rest of your stuff, and while you are doing that I will call the company and tell them they have a student who needs a cab.

WOW........ You're as mean as Rainy!!!

rofl-3.gifrofl-1.gif

Rainy D.'s Comment
member avatar

Yeah well you are lucky you didnt come to prime cause i would have requested you as a student lol

this meanie would let loose on you lol

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Tractor Man's Comment
member avatar

Yeah well you are lucky you didnt come to prime cause i would have requested you as a student lol

this meanie would let loose on you lol

That is the main reason I came back to Swift🤣

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Robert D. (Raptor)'s Comment
member avatar

Tractor Man

I think you're afraid of Rainy's dungeon! Not that I would blame you.

I have been planning my trips with my road atlas a d finding that it does quite well at bring me where I need to go. But I also use the Qualcomm. So I have a back up plan. I tried going to the Homeless depot from our Indiana terminal and it sent me through residential so I turned around and came back to the terminal for the night. I couldn't find the depot on the road atlas. So I thought I would get to a depot o e of these days.

You can't rely on the Qualcomm for you basic routing.

Raptor

Terminal:

A facility where trucking companies operate out of, or their "home base" if you will. A lot of major companies have multiple terminals around the country which usually consist of the main office building, a drop lot for trailers, and sometimes a repair shop and wash facilities.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.
Brett Aquila's Comment
member avatar

I always used various sources for directions and made sure at least several of them matched up. I would use my GPS, I would look at the Qualcomm directions, and I would use the satellite view on Google Maps. If it seemed straightforward and pretty obvious I'd go with those as long as two of the three matched up with each other.

If I had any doubt at all I would call the customer and get directions. The thing about calling the customer is that they know the little intricacies of getting into the place that won't show up anywhere else. There could be some construction going on with one of the side streets closed, or maybe it's best to use a certain entrance because they have part of the parking lot blocked with trailers or product overflow, or maybe there's an old crabby lady who throws stones at trucks if they go by her house on a certain route - that kind of stuff. You can pick up some very important little details from actually calling the customer.

But I always made sure that several different sources matched up and it all made good sense before I would drive into a place. Trust me, after a bunch of years out there you run into enough problems getting into customers that you want to be very, very certain of things before you go for it. The famous last words of almost anyone who got into a big mess were, "Let's just go. I'm sure it'll be fine."

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Junkyard Dog's Comment
member avatar

95% of the time GPS works pretty good but those other 5% really screw you. Thanks to this site I do the Google Earth and I also check Google Maps just to see if it agrees with my GPS. We also have shipper / consignee directions on a Qualcomm. Any questions I always call the shipper or receiver and many times they have recorded messages Directing you the easiest way. I learned this the hard way when I had to drive 40 miles out of my way in West Virginia just to find a turn around. What a lesson that taught me. Just today I was leaving Edgerton Kansas and my GPS kept telling me I was on a no truck Road when I was a half a mile from I-35. I'm pretty sure a new driver would have freaked out. I knew I was good because I was on a state highway.

Consignee:

The customer the freight is being delivered to. Also referred to as "the receiver". The shipper is the customer that is shipping the goods, the consignee is the customer receiving the goods.

Shipper:

The customer who is shipping the freight. This is where the driver will pick up a load and then deliver it to the receiver or consignee.

Qualcomm:

Omnitracs (a.k.a. Qualcomm) is a satellite-based messaging system with built-in GPS capabilities built by Qualcomm. It has a small computer screen and keyboard and is tied into the truck’s computer. It allows trucking companies to track where the driver is at, monitor the truck, and send and receive messages with the driver – similar to email.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Page 1 of 2 Next Page Go To Page:

New Reply:

New! Check out our help videos for a better understanding of our forum features

Bold
Italic
Underline
Quote
Photo
Link
Smiley
Links On TruckingTruth


example: TruckingTruth Homepage



example: https://www.truckingtruth.com
Submit
Cancel
Upload New Photo
Please enter a caption of one sentence or less:

Click on any of the buttons below to insert a link to that section of TruckingTruth:

Getting Started In Trucking High Road Training Program Company-Sponsored Training Programs Apply For Company-Sponsored Training Truck Driver's Career Guide Choosing A School Choosing A Company Truck Driving Schools Truck Driving Jobs Apply For Truck Driving Jobs DOT Physical Drug Testing Items To Pack Pre-Hire Letters CDL Practice Tests Trucking Company Reviews Brett's Book Leasing A Truck Pre-Trip Inspection Learn The Logbook Rules Sleep Apnea
Done
Done

0 characters so far - 5,500 maximum allowed.
Submit Preview

Preview:

Submit
Cancel

Join Us!

We have an awesome set of tools that will help you understand the trucking industry and prepare for a great start to your trucking career. Not only that, but everything we offer here at TruckingTruth is 100% free - no strings attached! Sign up now and get instant access to our member's section:
High Road Training Program Logo
  • The High Road Training Program
  • The High Road Article Series
  • The Friendliest Trucker's Forum Ever!
  • Email Updates When New Articles Are Posted

Apply For Paid CDL Training Through TruckingTruth

Did you know you can fill out one quick form here on TruckingTruth and apply to several companies at once for paid CDL training? Seriously! The application only takes one minute. You will speak with recruiters today. There is no obligation whatsoever. Learn more and apply here:

Apply For Paid CDL Training

About Us

TruckingTruth was founded by Brett Aquila (that's me!), a 15 year truck driving veteran, in January 2007. After 15 years on the road I wanted to help people understand the trucking industry and everything that came with the career and lifestyle of an over the road trucker. We'll help you make the right choices and prepare for a great start to your trucking career.

Read More

Becoming A Truck Driver

Becoming A Truck Driver is a dream we've all pondered at some point in our lives. We've all wondered if the adventure and challenges of life on the open road would suit us better than the ordinary day to day lives we've always known. At TruckingTruth we'll help you decide if trucking is right for you and help you get your career off to a great start.

Learn More