OO/LO Vs. Company Driver

Topic 25140 | Page 3

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Tractor Man's Comment
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Tractor Man, I don't know much about Mark M, but I certainly don't believe he's an O/O. If he is, he's very new to the game. His comments make it obvious.

He sure does seem to have all of the answers!

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's Comment
member avatar
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These type comments are always amusing to me. If anybody can show me some hard evidence that they now get to work less, make more money, and have "much greater" time off because they've become an O/O, I'd be reallly impressed. Unfortunately no one has ever been able to produce that evidence.

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You don't necessarily have to both make more money and have more free time to consider OO a success. One should probably go into being an OO for the freedom of schedule/free time and return on investment as a solo driver. To grow in size/scale would be a far different pursuit.

As far as evidence, probably because there are far, if not few who have to discipline to achieve self sufficient wealth while continuing on as an OO. And even if someone came onto this forum to describe their prescription to success, few would believe it and throw doubt on those findings. In other words, your going to believe what you want.

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We've got a few really talented O/O's in here as members. If any of what Mark M is saying here were true, these guys would confirm it for us. I've been in business for years - it always requires more work and more sacrifice than being an employee. There are no shortcuts to wealth or achieving a higher income.

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Don't deny that the pursuit of maximum return and growth does require more sacrifice, especially in time. But that's not what I'm prescribing as a well off OO.

True, there are no short cuts, you need to save and work hard to get to a lifestyle of allowing money to work for you. But it does get easier as you achieve wealth.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Bruce K.'s Comment
member avatar

Me thinks that most of those with the kind of money Mark recommends having are out seeing the country in one of those luxury Motorhomes we see all the time with the nice car or 4 wheel drive Jeep in tow.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
even if someone came onto this forum to describe their prescription to success, few would believe it and throw doubt on those findings. In other words, your going to believe what you want.

That's not true Mark. We like to deal with facts in here. We believe facts - that is what we want to believe. So far you have been completely void of facts. You've done a lot of talking as if you know what you are talking about, but it's pretty obvious to us you like to believe your own ideas while not even putting them into practice. Nobody with any decent business sense manages to put back the type of money you are talking about and then risks it all on a one truck Owner/Operator gig where they are going to primarily be cherry picking the loads they want to run whenever they feel like taking a little time away from their hobbies.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar

Tractor Man, I don't know much about Mark M, but I certainly don't believe he's an O/O. If he is, he's very new to the game. His comments make it obvious.

Yes, I'm not an O/O, in fact, not even a company truck driver. But I have had great success in building my own small businesses in the past. Having been retired for over the past ten years and no longer interested in going back to those business models from the past, I am about to set out on a new path in truck driving. Hope to learn a lot at the companies expense the first year or two, then reevaluate my options. I have read about other successful but mostly not so successful OO's on other forums. The industry is definitely stacked against the small operators. And yes, I agree, that it may be more wise to seek different passive/low active investments as you achieve wealth. Let's just see, should be fun!!

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
's Comment
member avatar
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That's not true Mark. We like to deal with facts in here. We believe facts - that is what we want to believe. So far you have been completely void of facts. You've done a lot of talking as if you know what you are talking about, but it's pretty obvious to us you like to believe your own ideas while not even putting them into practice. Nobody with any decent business sense manages to put back the type of money you are talking about and then risks it all on a one truck Owner/Operator gig where they are going to primarily be cherry picking the loads they want to run whenever they feel like taking a little time away from their hobbies.

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That's why I like this forum for it's contrast to other forums. As your experienced words do carry weight. But from what I have seen, so far, from others business experiences and my own. It probably isn't in the successful OO's interest to reveal their methods to a public forum in the event they only invite competition at their own demise. Especially if they are borrowing money to finance their own operations.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar
It probably isn't in the successful OO's interest to reveal their methods to a public forum in the event they only invite competition at their own demise.

Mark, these kind of comments are what make it so obvious that you don't have any understanding of the trucking industry. There aren't any little tightly held secrets to success among a special group of owner operators that keep them at the top of the food chain. This is a commodities business. There aren't some kind of regularly available super great runs that you can cherry pick. The rates are up and down all the time and very cyclical. There are times when nobody can make any money at it, and the competition is fierce.

That's why we don't appreciate you trying to teach people in here about your business methods - you don't understand this business. You may have been successful at other businesses, but that doesn't tell us anything about your business acumen as a trucker. We are happy to have you in here if you want to learn, but please stop with all the advice! Thanks for confirming the things we pretty much knew already, but try to educate yourself in here instead of coming on like you are some sort of expert. You are only making it obvious that you are not.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

's Comment
member avatar

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Mark, these kind of comments are what make it so obvious that you don't have any understanding of the trucking industry. There aren't any little tightly held secrets to success among a special group of owner operators that keep them at the top of the food chain. This is a commodities business. There aren't some kind of regularly available super great runs that you can cherry pick. The rates are up and down all the time and very cyclical. There are times when nobody can make any money at it, and the competition is fierce.

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Even a commodity business has relationships within. And if there is one golden rule in business, relationships can trump the overall market to a degree. Remain near that cost structure, foster those relationships, along with excellent/dependable service.

That would be a concern, when megas are willing to work at a loss to squeeze out competition. The only problem is that there are far too many players in the business, from what I see, to achieve that level of monopoly.

I agree, you want to be well insulated for those low points in the cycle.

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That's why we don't appreciate you trying to teach people in here about your business methods - you don't understand this business. You may have been successful at other businesses, but that doesn't tell us anything about your business acumen as a trucker. We are happy to have you in here if you want to learn, but please stop with all the advice! Thanks for confirming the things we pretty much knew already, but try to educate yourself in here instead of coming on like you are some sort of expert. You are only making it obvious that you are not.

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It was never my intent to try to come off as a know it all, far from it. I agree, to listen far more here than become vocal, wise words. But I had to say something on this matter because, so far, all I've seen on this forum, is a one sided discussion that fails to address counterpoints that seem obvious to my eyes, from my own business experiences .

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Rob T.'s Comment
member avatar

There have been numerous discussions from both sides, however the OO/LO starts name calling when their flaws are pointed out. 2 members here off the top of my head that have been quite open are Ernie and PJ. Ernie does it because it allows him the freedom of home time he desires, PJ has stated it's a short term thing for him. It was a dream of his and he has other income coming in so he isn't a typical OO. This forum has had many good discussions about it, however it almost always results in the OO/LO name calling and that isn't tolerated here. If you haven't seen the breakdowns by Rainy I'd check them out, although those are LO with prime.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
PackRat's Comment
member avatar

A Poserrofl-3.gif

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