OO/LO Vs. Company Driver

Topic 25140 | Page 4

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's Comment
member avatar

If you haven't seen the breakdowns by Rainy I'd check them out, although those are LO with prime.

Thank you. Yes, I did read the LO with Prime thread by Rainy. If anything, it just reconfirmed my suspicions about LO's or for the matter OO's, signing on with carriers. It's a stacked deck against you, that could go awry at any point, since you hold a short hand and compete with their own company drivers.

But, undeniable, there are successful OO's operating independently. To deny this is just as much a fallacy as to describe, since we don't get any good OO's laying out there successful formula here on the forum, then there is no such thing.

HOS:

Hours Of Service

HOS refers to the logbook hours of service regulations.
Old School's Comment
member avatar
But, undeniable, there are successful OO's operating independently. To deny this is just as much a fallacy as to describe, since we don't get any good OO's laying out there successful formula here on the forum, then there is no such thing.

Mark, I'm done with you. We've never denied that there are successful O/O's out there. Prove that statement to us would you? Find where we've done that and quote us in the act.

You see the problem with you is that you've come in here thinking you had it all figured out. You were surprised that we wouldn't encourage you in your folly, but you keep trying to rationalize your ideas to pacify your own ego. God forbid if you were wrong about something. You twist everything we say to make yourself "feel" you are correct.

For the record, we've consistently taught that the reward of being an O/O is not commensurate to the risk involved. Therefore it doesn't make any economic sense to risk the capital when you can do very well in this endeavor as a company driver. That's what we teach. You can twist it however you please as you try to rationalize your own convoluted ideas, but stop putting your ideas out here and claiming they are what we are saying.

G-Town's Comment
member avatar

Mark continues with a contrarian opinion:

But, undeniable, there are successful OO's operating independently.

Name one you know.

I know of one and he happens to be a regular contributor on this forum. He is brutally honest; his name is Dragon (Robert). Search on him...you will have the truth.

And your opinion, although you’re entitled to one; means very little without the benefit of years of first hand experience.

The goal here is to teach and help newbies become successful company drivers. Entertaining even the slightest interest in L/O or O/O before gaining at least a year of successful experience is way beyond foolish.

Sid V.'s Comment
member avatar

Mark,

There is no secret formula for being successful in trucking. What works for one person may not work for another.

The spot market that o/o's deal with is very fragile and goes up and down. You can take a load one week for $2k, and the next week the same load pays $1500 and the week after that it may not be available.

The main thing is if you're happy at what you are doing, keep doing it because the grass isn't always greener on the other side.

's Comment
member avatar

Name one you know.

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But, undeniable, there are successful OO's operating independently.

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How about a whole authority called Landstar, with 10,000 OO's. I agree, this talk of OO's is not for the new driver.

Rob D.'s Comment
member avatar

When I was younger, I had a guy ask me for directions to a hotel that I knew didn't exist. After arguing with him for a while, I gave him directions that send him on a wild goose chase.

Old School, maybe you should adopt the same approach. Maybe even tell a little white lie that you were once an O/O, but gave it up because you just couldn't spend all the money you made.

OOS:

When a violation by either a driver or company is confirmed, an out-of-service order removes either the driver or the vehicle from the roadway until the violation is corrected.

Old School's Comment
member avatar
How about a whole authority called Landstar

Check out this article. It's based on my conversation with a gentleman leased on to Landstar for a couple of decades.

Confessions Of An Owner Operator

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

Splitter's Comment
member avatar

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How about a whole authority called Landstar

double-quotes-end.png

Check out this article. It's based on my conversation with a gentleman leased on to Landstar for a couple of decades.

Confessions Of An Owner Operator

I nominate Old School for sainthood status! I'd have thrown in the towel a long time ago.

Owner Operator:

An owner-operator is a driver who either owns or leases the truck they are driving. A self-employed driver.

's Comment
member avatar

Very good, Old School. Please allow me to play devils advocate and give rebuttal to your article.

According to other OO's (some Landstar) in other forums, I find the following a common logical scenario.

Money is not the only motivator to becoming an OO. Some want to control their time off, not just weekends. More often a third to half of the year, intermittently. Their success is that they don't accept any loads that don't fit into their minimum guidelines to a pre determined profit/net. Many find business directly with a company, bypassing brokers. Funding their own operations with cash can alleviate the immediate cost of time (this is old school). Thus you don't put any miles on your most expensive asset, the tractor, unless it is paying well. With no payments, time is not of essence. In the end they don't need to run their tractors more than 100,000 miles per year and a new tractor with warranty can last as much as five to six years, before trading it in for a new one.

Obviously, just like any small business, this is not the path for everyone. Most small businesses fail. Becoming an OO is no different than a small business. There are many reasons for failure, often poor money management is first main reason. Most drivers should remain company drivers.

OWI:

Operating While Intoxicated

Old School's Comment
member avatar

Mark, we are quite happy for you to go be an O/O. Just stop trying to convince us that you know what you're talking about. It's been obvious to me from the beginning that you are blissfully ignorant on the subject. You've no experience - absolutely zero! You're not currently a driver. In fact you don't even have your CDL. You've drank the Koolaid to the extent that you think you can take a third to a half the year off and still be profitable. Congratulations! Please quit trying to convince us. We already have our education - we don't need your help.

Earlier you made this statement...

I agree, this talk of OO's is not for the new driver.

Please abide by your own convictions. You are not a teacher. You aren't even a student yet. Stop trying to convince us of how much you know. We don't really care how or where you get your information. It's all skewed by your own ego. The same thing that makes you think you have something to offer us.

Enough already!

Obviously, just like any small business, this is not the path for everyone. Most small businesses fail. Becoming an OO is no different than a small business. There are many reasons for failure, often poor money management is first main reason. Most drivers should remain company drivers.

Do you realize how arrogant you sound?

You think you're special. Most drivers should remain company drivers, but not you - you are enlightened, you are special, you know how to manage money. Guess what? You still haven't demonstrated one shred of evidence that convinces us you have what it takes to make it out here.

I have all the means to be an Owner/Operator. I don't ever see myself going that route. I'm a competent rational business person and investor. The economics of it don't add up. I am making great money as a company driver. I can never seem to put a business plan together that earns me more as an owner. I currently control my own time off, and I pick my loads every week. You seem to think company drivers are slaves to a system. That's why it's so clear to us you don't know what you're talking about. Your entire trucking education is from research you've done online. It's absolutely the most dangerous place to learn about trucking. You're completely full of misinformation. That's why we keep having to push back on your comments.

CDL:

Commercial Driver's License (CDL)

A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles:

  • Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds.
  • Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or more persons, including the driver.
  • Any vehicle required by federal regulations to be placarded while transporting hazardous materials.
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